Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
davewe

College Costs In Philippines

Recommended Posts

My wife recently graduated with a BS from Saint Josephs College in Maasin, Leyte. Sounds like the cost was about $1000/semester but with several extra expenses as well, and of course books. She worked for 5 years to put herself threw.

 

Her brother is about to graduate from high school and of course the family cannot afford to send him to college. I know she would love to help him but understands that we cannot - at least not until she is working a bit. But before I say anything I wanted to get a real idea about tuition costs.

 

I am not talking about one of the expensive Manila top tiered schools, so let's not worry about those. And IF I considered helping him it would probably not be to foot the entire bill.

 

So before I get in too deep and even hint to my wife that we can help, I wanted to get a notion of costs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

40,000 Peso's a semester including books and "normal" school supply's is a good average.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, try the Search function for more details.

At SEARCH move the cursor arrow to the far right icon, a drop down will appear that will enable you to refine a topic request.

Good luck, I think it will provide helpful information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, try the Search function for more details.

At SEARCH move the cursor arrow to the far right icon, a drop down will appear that will enable you to refine a topic request.

Good luck, I think it will provide helpful information.

I did find a little but not a lot. Goggled my wife's college and could not even find the tuition prices for that. OTOH, had less problems finding out the prices for the major Manila schools, but can't consider those.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem Dave always feel free to share your experiences or questions that is what this forum is about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and of course the family cannot afford to send him to college. I know she would love to help him but understands that we cannot -

 

let me help you save $$..

does the family have SSS?

or is current on the SSS payments/contributions ?

 

News from SSS that they now offer EDUCATIONAL LOANS

yes its a few more steps for them to get the money ,YET in the long run,

1.IT REDUCES your outlay

 

2.hopefully instills discipline in them to be more responsible

3.plans his future by having some "retirement" or survivor income

for the family that he will have in the upcoming years 

 

 

https://www.sss.gov.ph/sss/index2.jsp?secid=5245&cat=6&pg=null

 

https://www.sss.gov.ph/sss/index2.jsp?secid=4165&cat=6&pg=null

 

More college and vocational-technical (voc-tech) course students can expect to meet their financial requirements for enrollment as the Social Security System (SSS)

further liberalized the guidelines of its educational loan facility called the SSS Educational Assistance Loan Program or "Educ-Assist".

       SSS President and Chief Executive Officer Emilio de Quiros, Jr.

said members earning P25,000 and below per month are now eligible for Educ-Assist loans, replacing SSS’ former limit of P15,000 on the monthly income needed to qualify under previous guidelines.

 

       "Members can now borrow up to P20,000 per semester or trimester, up from the previous limit of P15,000 for college

degrees. For voc-tech courses, we likewise increased the maximum loanable amount to P10,000 from the previous cap of P7,500 per semester or trimester," he noted.

       The P7-billion SSS Educ-Assist fund allotment consists of P3.5 billion in national government (NG) subsidy and P3.5 billion in SSS counterpart funding. The loans must be used to pay for tuition and miscellaneous fees and are intended to help students from low-income families.

        Loan beneficiaries can be the SSS members themselves or their children *,

while unmarried members can designate their siblings, including their half-brother or sister. No substitution of beneficiary is allowed. Under the new guidelines, a married SSS member can now designate up to two loan beneficiaries,

who can be the member himself or herself, his or her spouse or legitimate or illegitimate children.

Unmarried members remain entitled to one loan beneficiary.

       "It is now possible for a married couple, who are both qualified borrowers, to support the education of up to four children through Educ-Assist loans. Meanwhile, unmarried members can use the loan to help their siblings pursue their studies and lighten their parents’ financial burden at the same time," de Quiros said.

 

      Another significant change is the relaxed contribution requirement, under which SSS members with a minimum of 12 posted contributions, including at least one paid contribution within the past three months prior to the date of application,

are now allowed to borrow.

Members without any contribution for the past three months can pay and present the proof of payment to SSS.

      In the past, a member must have at least 36 monthly contributions, three of which should be within the 12-month period before the application date, to qualify.

      "The SSS has disbursed over P195 million so far in Educ-Assist loans to thousands of student-beneficiaries all over the country. We have already earmarked about P590 million, or 11 percent of the total fund allocation, for these students so that they can complete their chosen course, and we expect availment to increase further as a result of the revised guidelines," de Quiros said.

       Loan repayment is also not burdensome as it will only start one year after the beneficary’s graduation or the date of last loan release. Borrowers for college degree programs have five years to repay the loan, while those who borrowed for voc-tech courses are given three years, he added.

       Half of the loan amount will be taken from the NG share and the other half from SSS.

The SSS portion carries an interest rate of six percent per annum based on diminishing principal balance until full payment while the NG share has zero interest, for a "blended" annual interest rate of about three percent.

 

       The college must be accredited by the Commission on Higher Education while the voc-tech course must be at least a two-year program recognized by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority. Educ-Assist application forms are available at SSS branches or downloadable from the SSS website.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'day Dave. I am in Calbayog, Samar, and am supporting two kids in their first year college, and one 22 year old in third year college.

Tuition fees depend primarily on the number of subject units the kids undertake, but it seems generally that 30 units is reasonable.

Reading from the Certificate of Registration I have here in front of me for a course in BATCHELOR OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION the fees per semester ( half year) stand at 12,190 peso. This is at 'Christ the King College' here, and  it is pretty much the same for the boys here studying Criminology at the NWSSU. I don't know if these fees are any different from Manila fees, but I would expect so, being in a 'poorer' province. I do know that the NWSSU here is not reluctant to cancel subjects in a course, probably because they cannot find suitable teachers.

 

The fees are payable at various times; e.g. for this semester on enrolment 1000p (11/12/13), prior to mid-term exam 4140p (11/27/13), at start of second  term 4140p (18/12/13), prior to mid-term exams 1454p  (29/1/14) and at end of term 1454p(03/26/14).

 

 

Of course, there are additional fees and charges for various extraneous activities. Interestingly, my kids cannot seem to give me prior warning of these fees, and invariably make their requests for cash at the eleventh hour. Well 11:59 actually.

 

Hope you find the above of some use.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuition for Med Tech at Riverside College in Bacolod is 42,000p per semester, plus all those extra activities, plus vaccinations, plus travel/food costs at 12,000p per semester. If you live close to the college, it certainly is better as they go 6 days a week, sometimes for nothing. It takes 3 transfers each way. The 4 year course could be done in 2 years. This week, she went Monday but the teachers were absent so she came home at noon. She went Tuesday but the teachers were absent so she came home. There was no classes on Wednesday. Thursday and Friday had classes. With thousands of unemployed teachers in PI, they have no substitute teachers to fill in and they don't know from day to day if there will be a class. The teachers had luncheon seminars and meetings this week so only 2 days of classes after the Christmas break. This happens frequently.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

and of course the family cannot afford to send him to college. I know she would love to help him but understands that we cannot -

 

let me help you save $$..

does the family have SSS?

or is current on the SSS payments/contributions ?

 

News from SSS that they now offer EDUCATIONAL LOANS

yes its a few more steps for them to get the money ,YET in the long run,

1.IT REDUCES your outlay

 

2.hopefully instills discipline in them to be more responsible

3.plans his future by having some "retirement" or survivor income

for the family that he will have in the upcoming years 

 

 

https://www.sss.gov.ph/sss/index2.jsp?secid=5245&cat=6&pg=null

 

https://www.sss.gov.ph/sss/index2.jsp?secid=4165&cat=6&pg=null

 

More college and vocational-technical (voc-tech) course students can expect to meet their financial requirements for enrollment as the Social Security System (SSS)

further liberalized the guidelines of its educational loan facility called the SSS Educational Assistance Loan Program or "Educ-Assist".

       SSS President and Chief Executive Officer Emilio de Quiros, Jr.

said members earning P25,000 and below per month are now eligible for Educ-Assist loans, replacing SSS’ former limit of P15,000 on the monthly income needed to qualify under previous guidelines.

 

       "Members can now borrow up to P20,000 per semester or trimester, up from the previous limit of P15,000 for college

degrees. For voc-tech courses, we likewise increased the maximum loanable amount to P10,000 from the previous cap of P7,500 per semester or trimester," he noted.

       The P7-billion SSS Educ-Assist fund allotment consists of P3.5 billion in national government (NG) subsidy and P3.5 billion in SSS counterpart funding. The loans must be used to pay for tuition and miscellaneous fees and are intended to help students from low-income families.

        Loan beneficiaries can be the SSS members themselves or their children *,

while unmarried members can designate their siblings, including their half-brother or sister. No substitution of beneficiary is allowed. Under the new guidelines, a married SSS member can now designate up to two loan beneficiaries,

who can be the member himself or herself, his or her spouse or legitimate or illegitimate children.

Unmarried members remain entitled to one loan beneficiary.

       "It is now possible for a married couple, who are both qualified borrowers, to support the education of up to four children through Educ-Assist loans. Meanwhile, unmarried members can use the loan to help their siblings pursue their studies and lighten their parents’ financial burden at the same time," de Quiros said.

 

      Another significant change is the relaxed contribution requirement, under which SSS members with a minimum of 12 posted contributions, including at least one paid contribution within the past three months prior to the date of application,

are now allowed to borrow.

Members without any contribution for the past three months can pay and present the proof of payment to SSS.

      In the past, a member must have at least 36 monthly contributions, three of which should be within the 12-month period before the application date, to qualify.

      "The SSS has disbursed over P195 million so far in Educ-Assist loans to thousands of student-beneficiaries all over the country. We have already earmarked about P590 million, or 11 percent of the total fund allocation, for these students so that they can complete their chosen course, and we expect availment to increase further as a result of the revised guidelines," de Quiros said.

       Loan repayment is also not burdensome as it will only start one year after the beneficary’s graduation or the date of last loan release. Borrowers for college degree programs have five years to repay the loan, while those who borrowed for voc-tech courses are given three years, he added.

       Half of the loan amount will be taken from the NG share and the other half from SSS.

The SSS portion carries an interest rate of six percent per annum based on diminishing principal balance until full payment while the NG share has zero interest, for a "blended" annual interest rate of about three percent.

 

       The college must be accredited by the Commission on Higher Education while the voc-tech course must be at least a two-year program recognized by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority. Educ-Assist application forms are available at SSS branches or downloadable from the SSS website.

 

This is great information - thanks. I have no idea whether they pay into SSS, but will ask the question.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to remember off the top of my head so of what this covered... Cebu Normal University SpED tuition and books came in at just under P15,000 per term. I'm paying for 3 others to go through school and I'm taking 4 intense courses myself right now... I know I paid $3.45 for 2 medium coffees today... I think

..

Sent by using a very long piece of string, a couple tin cans, 2 gaseous monkeys, Tapatalk and my Nexus 4

Edited by I am bob
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×