Why do Fiipinos Follow Silly Rules and Ignore Good Ones?
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Why do Fiipinos Follow Silly Rules and Ignore Good Ones?

Lets take a general look at why I ask this question.  Filipinos will elect Duterte, for example, and believe and follow some of the silly things he says, and yet they will ignore traffic rules.  Why is that?

For those who read my rant on "A Little Knowledge"  I believe it comes from the education system.

The education system starts out similar to the west, as in the students are taught that the teacher is their new guru. But there it changes.  The students find out that they can get better grades if they stay after class and clean the classroom.  They learn that they can do better in school if they go to the teacher's house after school and perform maid duties (and in some case other duties that I prefer not even to mention).  They learn that gifts to the teacher can get them better grades.  They learn they can pass the course without any studying or knowledge provided a little graft money changes hands.

Now this is not always the case.  Not every student DOES that.  But every student LEARNS that.  And thus the attitude of corruption is born.  It even carries through to College and some Universities.  Whereas westerners are taught in University to think for themselves, filipinos are still taught that the professor is king.

So when one of the elite reaches the status of Doctor, Lawyer, Professor, President or what-have-you then their instructions are unquestioned and the rules laid out are followed.  But when a "fellow student" reaches the rank of police officer or LTO tester (for example) then the old education system of how corruption works becomes the order of the day.

Has anyone anything to add to these thoughts?

 

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27 minutes ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

Has anyone anything to add to these thoughts?

Yes Dave.  I'm wondering where you came up with all this corruption in schools information.  I have never heard of it or experienced it with my daughter, and she tells me a lot about school.  Certainly there will be cases of it, and in Western schools too.

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In most cases Filipinos are followers and part of a group, they learn from an early age to obey elder family members. Mostly family holds top respect any outsiders rules are just a suggestion or an impediment to family clan or regional affiliation. Filipinos do seem to like a strong ruler-leader. The belonging to family or group is all important. For example with holding "love" or outside the hierarchical group is all powerful as in "outside the kulambo".

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ID: 4   Posted (edited)

In reference to the "obeying the rules" portion, here is my take.

I once asked my brother in law why folks drive like maniacs, u turns in the middle of a street, counter flow, parking facing traffic et et et. He told me "Its democracy in action!".

I think part of it is the complete 180 attitude change after martial law. After years of strict discipline they just let loose and there has not been the political will to stop the party and enforce the law. The old "give them an inch and they will take a mile" adage.

My wife was a teen ager during martial law and tells stories of Jaywalkers being stopped by traffic enforcers and made to sing the national anthem in the medium or sidewalk. Litterers made to go to the barangay hall and pick up trash. The list goes on and on.

Is this an over simplification? Probably, but I bet if we think about it there might be some kernel of truth in it. I bet Jake could tell some stories from the martial law days.

Edited by scott h
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My stepson attends a Catholic High School here in Davao City. I don't know if other private schools or public schools are different or have problems such as the ones that you mention. 

My stepson informs us of the discipline at the school. I'll just mention a few of them. Once, a trio of boys were expelled for "bullying:". They were calling other students names. Another time, one was expelled for "bullying". He forcefully would take other student's lunch or part of it. The most recent one is when one student was expelled for cheating on an exam. He was observed by the teacher copying answers off another student's test paper.  

The school has a very strict dress code and boys haircuts have to be what I call "high & tight". No dyed hair and no ear rings. English must be spoken on campus in and out of the classroom. 

With this said, I might add that schools in the states should be stricter about behaviour and dress codes.

I've read where children have been driven to suicide by "bullying".

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3 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

 I'm wondering where you came up with all this corruption in schools information.  I have never heard of it or experienced it with my daughter, and she tells me a lot about school.

I wonder if you daughter is telling all.  I hear the information that I impart second hand from many more sources than I care to admit to.  They all say virtually the same thing but this is not the kind of info they are telling their parents.  I wish you had asked me privately and I would have told you more true accounts than you would have dreamed possible but let me stick to just a handful of places where this info is coming from:

1)  My first live in partner in Philippines got all the way through college with a degree in Computer Programming.   She would jokingly say her major was "copy pasting" as she could barely turn the computer on and yet had a college degree, obtained through methods I have described.

2) A neighbor where I lived 5 years ago was a teacher.  She had a myriad of high school age girls (in the 12 to 16 year old range) who would stay at her house and act as maids during non school hours and got good grades from her at school.  The sad things were the screams when the teacher was not home and the students were at home alone with the teacher's husband.  I was told by everyone I mentioned it to that this is the way things are and I need to keep my mouth shut.  Perhaps he is just disciplining the girl's for not doing their homework :Caught:

3)  Other girls who have stayed with me have told similar stories, lets not get into who and how many.

4) Other foreigners have recounted similar tales and chosen to believe that this is the way life is in the Philippines and we should not get involved.

 

Does everyone get abused?  No, the really smart students do just fine.  Its the poor and dull-witted ones that the teachers know they can abuse.  Why doesn't it get reported or acknowledged?  Ask yourself why the Catholic priests were able to abuse young boys in so many countries before the story was eventually exposed.  Do you think people knew of it before it hit the news?  Of course they did but people in authority tend to be able to fly under the radar.  Going back to the Catholic priests.  I don't hear of many cases of Filipino priests abusing their congregation members so does that mean they don't?  Or does it mean that people in authority, in Philippines are used to getting away with certain things and people just don't talk about it.  Insest is another hot topic.  Do you really believe that none of the beautiful young filipinas have been abused by a relative when growing up?  But try to get anyone to talk about it.

Hope that answers your question and again, it should have been discussed in private, BUT if you are worried about your own kid in this situation I would not be concerned.  The children of the influential members of society are treated like princes and princesses.  She'll be fine.  It is also possible that your daughter goes to a private school that is full of higher class kids and the teachers would not pull stunts like that in these kinds of schools.  That is the kind of school the business and political leaders of the country come from.  Note that all of this is just a personal opinion based on dozens and dozens of similar stories from people I who's tales I believe.

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ID: 7   Posted (edited)

Not quite sure where this topic is going but....

Abuse of different kinds goes on the world over, however in a number of poor countries, abuse and corruption is a way of life.

If people are obtaining certifications by foul means, surely they eventually get found out.

With regards to what people are willing to do, they must feel it is important enough, because sadly in Philippines it's call survival.

Sexual abuse as you pointed out happens within families, religious institutions, schools and workplaces no doubt, sadly for some

it is a case of what are you willing to do for food, shelter or money!

Let's ask ourselves, why do people sell/take drug's, why do people sell their body's?

 

I watched a programme on the BBC iplayer last night. Channel three, title "Deadliest place to deal"

For some life is a constant battle for survival

 

 

Edited by Kuya John
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3 hours ago, Kuya John said:

If people are obtaining certifications by foul means, surely they eventually get found out.

Of course they get found out.  But there is a silly standard for jobs as simple as cashier at a grocery store.  The standard is a college degree.  Many of my ex's classmates got cashier jobs at places like Fooda in Cebu.  It is simple enough to figure out that a person who cannot operate a cash register and yet has a degree in Computer Programming has not come by it honestly but who cares?  The employer has a requirement, so long as that requirement is filled then they are happy and do not care how it is done.  I met a girl last month who worked 3 years for a call center in Dumaguete.  She did really well.  One of the requirements to get the job was a college degree.  She never went to college so had a fraudulent degree made up.   It worked.  It really is how things are done here for a lot of people.

Look how many people have driver's licenses but could not pass a test.  How do you suppose they got those licenses?  Where do they learn this attitude of corruption?

So when the rules are easily broken by anyone with money or a willingness to do certain favors, its no wonder that the important, good rules do not get followed.  So lets get back to part 2, why do they follow silly rules like the doctor who tells them "don't walk in the hot sun" or "don't ride on a motorcycle when you are pregnant"?  Or the politician who tells them "vote for me and I will end corruption (and pay you 200 pesos)"

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ID: 9   Posted (edited)

I recall a question during my high school days some 50 years ago. If you put up a "No Parking" sign next to a building and motorists continue to park, should you remove the sign or keep it? The problem is not rules, but rather, the ability to enforce them. 

When our younger son visited the Philippines with us, he was cringing and keeping his eyes closed on the drive from the airport to our hotel. In the chaos of traffic, an accident was a certainty. He relaxed a few days later after realizing there are rules -- very different from the United States -- but rules observed by local motorists.

There are terrible universities and colleges known as "diploma mills." The HR managers of corporations know them and avoid hiring except for menial work. The better ones produce competent students with skills. 

 

Edited by JJReyes
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7 hours ago, JJReyes said:

If you put up a "No Parking" sign next to a building and motorists continue to park, should you remove the sign or keep it?

Many years ago, as a Safety Director, I attended a three day seminar on how to write an effective and legal Company Policy Manual.  It was only on the final day that I learned the single most valuable (for me) advice.  "There only thing worse than not having a clear, concise, and legal policy manual at your company.  That is to have a manual and not follow it TO THE LETTER.  If you have written rules that are not being enforced it is worse than having no rules at all.  With no rules you can always claim ignorance.  Not following the rules that you have published will only be viewed by the employees as favoritism or prejudice and your entire manual being rejected by the courts as not being applied properly."

I think the same advice applies to any group of individuals; government, schools, business, even families should have clear, consistent, and reasonable rules that are enforced and apply to everyone regardless of social or economic standing.

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