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Gratefuled

We probably don't think much about it but what if?

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Gratefuled    3,297

Since the Philippines is within The Ring of Fire, are you prepared for a major earthquake or even a tsunami like the one that hit Japan? There are small tremors occurring all the time. Some we feel slightly others we do not. Here in southern Mindanao they occur out in the ocean and a couple of times since I've been here there were tsunami warnings but they never occurred. Large tsunami can go inland as far as a few miles. it all depends on the terrain. Then, there are active volcanoes and dormant ones that could get the locals worried if they start spewing. 

Being from southern California I have experienced many earthquakes and they always get my attention. I feel rather safe in California but not here. Just something else to think about in addition to all the other bad things that could happen here. 

What about you? 

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Dave Hounddriver    19,121
10 minutes ago, Gratefuled said:

are you prepared for a major earthquake or even a tsunami like the one that hit Japan?

I am curious how you think we could prepare for a disaster like that when living in this third world country?  Hell, I was prepared for the Super Typhoon that hit in 2013 but everyone else wasn't so I ran out of my supplies within a couple of weeks and there was still no way to replenish them.  You'd have to be a Survivalist to be prepared for that in Philippines.

You've made your bed by moving here so now ya gotta lie in it. (Although Lynn points out that I just had a huge mother of a mirror installed as a headboard and if we were lying in the bed when the major earthquake hit we would get our heads cut off quicker that waiting for the Abu Sayaf to do it. :SugarwareZ-037:

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AlwaysRt    2,802
2 hours ago, Gratefuled said:

What about you? 

I didn't focus much on earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis, but I did take a good look at typhoons when selecting Dumaguete as the place to visit. This site has information on the 1st three categories http://vm.observatory.ph/geophys_maps.html

1 hour ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

(Although Lynn points out that I just had a huge mother of a mirror installed as a headboard and if we were lying in the bed when the major earthquake hit we would get our heads cut off quicker that waiting for the Abu Sayaf to do it.

Sure but still safer than installing it on the ceiling....

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JJReyes    4,385

After Hurricane Iniki, the state government in Hawaii asked families to prepare for a future disaster. The minimum was 3 days supply of food, water, propane and medication. The example is one gallon of water per person per day. Supermarkets likewise sold disaster kits containing dried food and first aid kits for about $100 per family of four. It was sufficient for one week.

No disaster for nearly 20 years. Every few years, we donated the supplies to a charity and purchased new canned food. The system work because 80% of the population believe they have a civic responsibility to be prepared. Why 3 days? That's the estimated time needed to bring relief goods from the US Mainland.

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Jake    10,300

Mirrors -- perhaps a subject of another topic (Anitos Love Motel in Pasay, Manila).

Anyway, even if you are a professional survivalist which means you can readily live off the grid for months without any assistance, I'm afraid the local community and the local govt would be a hindrance anyway.  You really have to be out in the sticks to be truly independent and not be dependent from your neighbors.  Or worse, they would be depending on you.....he, he.  

Thinking back, did the local and govt officials learned their lesson during that super typhoon that hit Leyte several years ago?  Or was it mostly photo ops and bickering among politicians -- the typical fraud, waste and abuse. Remember the relief packages from US military being sold in the local market in Manila?  The unnecessary delay or red tape of international relief efforts was the status quo.    

Has southern Leyte fully recovered?  Again, I think man-made calamities vs natural calamities are the worst killers. 

 

 

 

 

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JJReyes    4,385

During the martial law era, every time Marcos would declare, "There is no rice shortage." I would send someone to buy a couple of sacks. One would be for the family and household staff. The second would be divided among other employees. We also kept a six to nine months supply of non-perishable essentials like laundry soap and toilet paper because administrative inefficiency meant the supply chain could easily get disrupted. Certain items would disappear from grocery shelves. We didn't know if it was manipulation to increase prices or what. It was also a period of high inflation. Better to buy goods than keeping the money in a bank account.

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Kuya John    3,322

When Yolanda hit Leyte a little while back 2014, the devastation continued inland some distance.

It's a case of choosing to be on the coast or further inland and risk earthquakes.

Some areas are less proned than other's to Typhoons. Mirror mirror on the wall...if only we could predict the future

 

Edited by Kuya John
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Old55    6,308

Disaster preparedness is wise especially in locations infrastructure and supply chains are inadequate to begin with.

Edited by Old55
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Queenie O.    2,514
3 hours ago, Kuya John said:

When Yolanda hit Leyte a little while back 2014, the devastation continued inland some distance.

It's a case of choosing to be on the coast or further inland and risk earthquakes.

Some areas are less proned than other's to Typhoons. Mirror mirror on the wall...if only we could predict the future

 

That's true Kuya, btw are you referring to Dave's mirror?

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scott h    6,353

We do what we can within reason. When building our house we used quality materials in case of earth quake. Made our home as secure as possible. Keep 10 liters of drinking water and 15 liters of potable water. Insure the old pump is operational. Keep quite a bit of canned goods on the shelf (not an insane amount but a bit). Keep a bit of cash in the safe et et et.

But my biggest fallback is I live very close to the airport. :hystery:

 

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