Jump to content
Jack Peterson

What happens when dogs inbreed

Recommended Posts

15 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

 My Korean neighbors bought 2 German Shepard pups, male and female, from a local litter.  They kept them next door to us for a while so I got to know them.  Then they moved them to another house.  She told me yesterday that the female is pregnant and my first thought is the father is her brother.  What happens when dogs inbreed like that?

 Up until 7 weeks maybe 10 at most you can get an Injection to abort

Edited by Dave Hounddriver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Jack Peterson said:

 Up until 7 weeks maybe 10 at most you can get an Injection to abort

So if they are born, what is to be expected?

I hope I am wrong on this and they had the sense to prevent this from happening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

So if they are born, what is to be expected?

I hope I am wrong on this and they had the sense to prevent this from happening.

 I have never had it happen but I would suspect that if all survive they may well all be OK. InBreeding is not uncommon especially here so I would not worry too much, as long as the mother does not Reject them. I think I would love em just the same  but make sure the he's and she's are kept separate next time when the time Comes, especially at night or when no one is around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

Side note dog topic.  My Korean neighbors bought 2 German Shepard pups, male and female, from a local litter.  They kept them next door to us for a while so I got to know them.  Then they moved them to another house.  She told me yesterday that the female is pregnant and my first thought is the father is her brother.  What happens when dogs inbreed like that?

Hip dysplasia  is very common among inbred German Shepherds. It's the main weakness among that breed as a whole.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Snowy79 said:

Hip dysplasia  is very common among inbred German Shepherds. It's the main weakness among that breed as a whole.

Dobermans can suffer with that also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is just a generalization based on my observation throughout many provinces, barrios and cities.  Many of the dogs I see are strays, often malnourished and dirty.  I guess they survive on garbage, handouts or they prey on smaller animals.  Some have erratic or aggressive behavior, possibly suffering from rabies.  Of course all of them (stray, street or village dogs) will defecate anywhere.  I know that based on first hand experience while staggering back home late one night.  Lesson learned -- use a flashlight at night because you will never walk a straight line, even during the day.  

So, most of the locals have a general apathy or worse, a fear from getting attack from a gang of stray dogs.  I personally ran over a couple dogs, going through a barrio at the outskirts of Batangas City (south of Manila).  They were asleep in the middle of the asphalt road, probably because it was a cooler surface?  I did not make any evasive maneuvers or hard braking, otherwise I would have taken a nosedive down a steep mountainous ravine (no guard rails of course).  

I would love to have a big German Shepard but I'm worried it might be KFR (kidnap for ransom).....he, he.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Snowy79 said:

Hip dysplasia  is very common among inbred German Shepherds. It's the main weakness among that breed as a whole.

I have read a bit about that issue here in the Philippines, and some breeders advertise their pups as "true German" strains or something like, that do not get hip problems.

Hip problems are a big issue on many large breeds.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Jake said:

This is just a generalization based on my observation throughout many provinces, barrios and cities.  Many of the dogs I see are strays, often malnourished and dirty.  I guess they survive on garbage, handouts or they prey on smaller animals.  Some have erratic or aggressive behavior, possibly suffering from rabies.  Of course all of them (stray, street or village dogs) will defecate anywhere.  I know that based on first hand experience while staggering back home late one night.  Lesson learned -- use a flashlight at night because you will never walk a straight line, even during the day.  

So, most of the locals have a general apathy or worse, a fear from getting attack from a gang of stray dogs.  I personally ran over a couple dogs, going through a barrio at the outskirts of Batangas City (south of Manila).  They were asleep in the middle of the asphalt road, probably because it was a cooler surface?  I did not make any evasive maneuvers or hard braking, otherwise I would have taken a nosedive down a steep mountainous ravine (no guard rails of course).  

I would love to have a big German Shepard but I'm worried it might be KFR (kidnap for ransom).....he, he.  

They are all over the place here in Kalayaan now.  Huskies are also popular.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi to everyone. This is my first post after following the forum for some time.

I live in  South Africa. I've been a dog breeder and trainer for many years. Specialised in dogs for service, police, protection and protection sports. Been lucky enough to teach and supply dogs to several countries over the years.

I'd like to answer some of the questions asked about dogs.

Inbreeding as such is not desirable if close up, eg. parents to progeny, or even closer would be siblings bred together. Many dogs have inbreeding a little further back, say with common ancestors in the third or forth generation, known as 'line breeding'.  In fact without this little success will be achieved in creating some sought after quality.  All breeds of dogs were created by inbreeding. Now more often line bred in an attempt to retain some feature.

It is safe to say in general only persons knowledgeable enough to identify highly desirable qualities should attempt close inbreeding, and be ruthless in culling lesser pups. Many breed clubs simply will not allow it, by not accepting pups for registration [though there are always those in power in the organisation who do, and get away with it...politics]

The problem is that so many undesirable characteristics are hidden and may come to the fore with the pups of an inbred litter. All breeds have problems carried in their genes, those that are ''show popular'' as in beauty/confirmation showing tend to retain more..as opposed to work lines within breeds.

As far as hip dysplasia is concerned, it occurs in all breeds except the racing greyhound, less in those breeds that work, more in those that show. The German Shepherd breed [I've had them all my life] has in fact less of an HD problem than say Labradors. All breeding dogs should be x-rayed and certified on their HD status at not less than 1yr of age.

To perhaps confuse the casual reader more, those inbred dogs that are from excellent dogs and themselves are excellent in all aspects, but not limited to health and temperament, could be highly prized. Although this with any breed should be for active enthusiasts.

If the dogs in question have never been x-rayed and their parents never either, it's just pot luck.

Please insure they are vaccinated, at least with the 5 in1, especially the Dam but before the last trimester to provide maternal antibodies to the pups.

Some vets will allow a hormone injection within 24hrs of mating to prevent pregnancy, others wont claiming it risks cancer, I'm unsure of the level of veterinary standards in Philippines.

The new born pups should be closely examined for deformities and culled if this appears.

I fear this may be a too long a post and would like to comment on those other dog health and security issues posted recently but will wait to see if this is received well or not by members.

Bye,

Terry

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, WHIPPING BOY said:

Hi to everyone. This is my first post after following the forum for some time.

I live in  South Africa. I've been a dog breeder and trainer for many years. Specialised in dogs for service, police, protection and protection sports. Been lucky enough to teach and supply dogs to several countries over the years.

I fear this may be a too long a post and would like to comment on those other dog health and security issues posted recently but will wait to see if this is received well or not by members.

Bye, Terry

Welcome aboard Terry!  Excellent post.....thank you!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×