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  1. I just wanted to share this ! because i thought it was such an act of kindness from my friend to her neighbors , last friday i sent $200 to my friend in ormoc i said buy what you need to help you ! tonight when i get home from work i got this message in a pm on my Facebook from my friend and i will quote it exactly in her words to me " mama packing goods to share with our neighbor here... " i was shocked and touched by this even though they lost everything they were still willing to share the little bit they had also to help there neighbors ! im really starting to be impressed by this family and this woman ! felling so lucky and happy tonight !!! O-U-C :thumbsup:
    6 points
  2. Over the last year or so we have discussed this in various ways. If you consider, the average wage here is about 250p per day, it would follow, that $1000 or 43000p, a month, should, allow us to live, like kings. It does not happen. There are lots of reasons and the main one is US, we still, want to live a western style life and this, can cost. For me and this is only my, opinion, you will need a very good local lady/wife that can handle money, is trustworthy and not too near her own family. Let here do her own buying, see to the bills ect. they can make 500p go a lot further than we ever could. Even beer. I am lucky, I have one of these sometimes elusive ladies. My take home beer is 18p per 330m bottle if she, shops locally. for me the cost is 35p and this is just a one off example my friend, IMHO it can be done and is done but not in a great way, by a foreigner on his own I do not think I would survive very long on my own :tiphat:
    5 points
  3. She's been burnt, pretty badly by the sounds of it. Many people on the wrong end of a relationship break-up walk away with feeling little sense of self-worth despite all evidence to the contrary. It's just human nature, not really restricted to females or Filipinas. Sounds like Jennifer is going through that and combined with wanting to do the best for her boys it's completely understandable. From a Filipina perspective family is all, and Jen probably feels she's failed at that and that sense of failure taints her perception of everything she does. Either that or she's being typically female and fishing for compliments, which I doubt, given your description of the type of person she is. Best thing to do as a friend is reinforce the positive, and when it warrants it, chat to her about the negative, but tread very carefully, if at all, depending on the depth and strength of your friendship. Sorry, Social Worker Brett coming to the fore.
    4 points
  4. It's not only your month to month expenses you must consider, also your inherited family's running costs. It is very hard to avoid copping the bill for the poorer members of your GF's family and you will see many comments on this forum about this subject. Also be prepared to cop medical and hospital bills for family members that fall sick or get injured. You will be made to feel like the king of the family here in Phils but you will get to pay for that place in the family.
    4 points
  5. I too have heard that $1K USD/month in the Philippines is a princely sum that will allow me to live a pretty lavish lifestyle....a "factoid" that has really piqued my interest in the RP. But from what I've read here, that's not exactly accurate. What's confusing me is I've heard this from a citizen of the Philippines who was living there up until just a few years ago. In fact, just yesterday, she pointed out that $1K USD = P43K (as of yesterday, according to Google), which is around what a Senator in the Philippines makes. So what's the deal?? I consider myself firmly in the middle class here in the US. I do really want to simplify my life when I retire. A smaller place to live (my house here is ~ 1,800 sq ft, half that would be fine). I can live w/o air conditioning if I can have a fan or ceiling fans. I don't hit the bars, I think my entertainment needs could be met with internet, a decent TV, and my Blu-rays when the weather keeps me from going for a walk. LOL Not to be nosey, but is the average ex-pat a lot more well-off than I thought?
    3 points
  6. We use a sub-meter to track our electric use. Our landlord pays the electric company for total use of the property and we pay her for our use. My portion is around p2,000 a month. Her portion is p500 a month. But it is because I insist on so many "western" luxuries. I don't have aircon but I use fans, TV, running water, a refrigerator... she has none of these. "Western" can mean a lot of things ha ha.
    3 points
  7. Some very good info here especially about the "western way of living" ..... it all depends on how well YOU can adapt to living here .... now you can continue living like you do in the country you come from OR you can adapt your life style to your new country of residences ..... now I'm not talking about living in a nipa hut (although some foreigners do) and there is certainty nothing wrong with that .... but we rent a newly built townhouse for p7000 ( $162.79 US) Our biggest expense is food ... we like to eat but not foreign types ..... she cooks everyday but actually only one ulam (main one dish meal) she cooks enough for supper and only has to reheat it ..... unlike in western societies where both lunch and supper are cooked separately .... of course rice is cooked separately for each meal .... :thumbsup: :hystery: ..... the food is usually NOT put into the frig after it is cooked and is placed under a plastic cover on the table until it is eaten or reheated ..... another totally unheard of custom in the US ..... been living here over 6 years and have never been sick yet ..... of course things with mayo etc. are kept in the frig .... if you choose to go the foreign food route you are going to pay a lot more .... not so much because we are foreigners but because the market for the stuff is far less than the cost native foods ..... our monthly bill for food generally comes to around p17,000 ($395) this includes eating out every now and then ..... Electric runs us about p1400 ($32) but no aircon (a/c) didn't use it in Florida and we don't use it here .... we use gasul (propane) for cooking and a portable water heater for heating bath water (only in the winter) .... we have a microwave .... turbo broiler ... TV .... computer ... fans and other small appliances .... but no total electric house like in the US .... Internet and telephone runs us p1300 ($30) for 2Mbps service .... and p1090 ($25) for Cignal Satellite TV service .... get about 74 channels We have a Kia Sportage SUV and spend about p1000 ($23) for diesel per month .... but that does change a bit .... mostly up .. not down .... :mocking: Those are our biggest expenses BUT I am on a 13a visa (married permanent resident visa) so no visa costs or runs (out of the country) We don't drink .... smoke or party so no costs there ..... we do however have insurance .... my asawa's SSS ... etc. that are not monthly bills but do have to be paid and other expenses such as drinking water at p35x2 per week ..... This will give you a rough idea how we live on $1100 per month but then we also have some set aside for emergencies if need be ..... and we also don't have to support the family ... they all have jobs but we send her mother a small bit each month to do with as she feels fit .... Can you live like this .... I have no idea ... no two people live of think a like .... just showing you it is possible .... possible for you .... only you know for sure and you won't know that unless you try it HERE .... not from your arm chair in the US .... JMHO I will say this that if it wasn't for my asawa I couldn't live as cheaply as we do .... no way .... a good woman will make the biggest different in how you can live .... and just like finding one that is thrifty .... you can also find one that will drive you into the poor house .... that choice is also yours .... but that my friend is a topic for another thread ..... :thumbsup: :hystery: :hystery: :hystery: :cheersty:
    3 points
  8. Well my friend, as with all these posts, no one here (I am sure) will be trying to put you off but the things you will read, are never, written in the tourist brochures and our hosts would argue points, on the things they like but can not afford. We (I certainly) like a washing machine, these cost to run as they do anywhere, our ladies wash every day, no full loads. I stopped this and sold the machine, she has now gone back to hand wash and enjoys it. I feel you smile but it is true. As westerners we want to enjoy what we are used to. (Not all can eat Filipino food every day and honestly say they enjoy it) so we buy Steak. and the rest of the meal is expensive also (Chips, Salads that we can eat) We buy the better wines (Twice the cost of the stuff normally bought) High speed Internet is costly but we demand it so, we have to pay for it. Allen ( I presume this is your day name. :unsure: all things that we Westerners want, are Imported, (The real thing I mean) Super markets know this and so we have to pay for it. Anything, we need to sustain our Life as we knew it, will and does, cost. The list could go on and on but my meaning was just this. If, we want to maintain our Western ways here, ( and many do) we just have to pay for it. As this Topic goes forward, and I for one think it is a good one, so well done, I will throw in items I feel should or could have been said. many times I have said this and I am convinced it is right, " We are our own worst enemies" We want to live idyllically, cheaply but still want, our previous " Home Comforts" These cost. This My friend, is the Westerner in us. What we want, we will have So, we have to pay, the long nose tax. Local ladies will always get a better deal, I never go shopping locally with my Wife, as soon as they see me the price goes up. of course this is the Filipino way and it is more Fun :) :tiphat:
    3 points
  9. Okay, I hesitate to post this.....for starters it exposes my complete lack of dating skills....but as you all do have a ton of experience, maybe you can help clear up some confusion I have regarding my friend Jennifer. Jennifer is one of three Filipinos I have known in my life. I met her a little over a year ago at my church. She's 38, the mother of two great boys, college-educated, and to hear her tell it, from a pretty well-to-do background. She was also somewhat of a Filipina celebrity back in the 90s, playing with a few notable rock bands in the RP. She and I hit it off when we met, almost to the point where I began to think there was "something" there, but her self-imposed rule of "no dating" (long story that, perhaps to be touched on later here) keeps me pretty firmly in the "Friend Zone". And in case you're wondering, she is NOT the reason why I'd retire to the Philippines. That's a mix of financial and "something different". Anyway, I digress...... Jennifer came to the US around 3 years ago. As I understand the story, she married a guy from China while in the RP. Together they had their first son, then the husband moved to the US. Jen stayed behind as her father was ill. At some point, her husband came back to the islands, resulting in Son #2, then left once more for the US. Her father passed away, so she decided to join her husband here in West Virginia. She was stunned to learn that 1) he had a long-term girlfriend, and 2) the two of them were living together at his parents' house. "Awkward" is an understatement. From what I gather, the husband's parents were a little less than "civil" with her and the boys, so she elected to leave (pretty understandable, I think) that mess and try to make something happen here in the US. As an aside, I have to say I can't imagine the balls it'd take to do that. She had practically nothing but the clothes on her back and the boys didn't have much more, and here she is in a foreign country, no friends, etc. etc. Just one of many things I admire about her. Anyway, she finds her way to Scott Depot Christ Fellowship, a local non-denominational church/school. In one day, she secures a job with the daycare there, and one of the pastor sets her up in a house the church owns right behind the school. Call it 'divine intervention'....I do. :) So about a year or so after all that happens, I run into her. So....a couple of the things I just don't get.... 1) She works non-stop. Not just at the school, but doing volunteer stuff at church (she plays bass, runs the sound board, helps with the visual media stuff) or cleaning the house CONSTANTLY. I understand the church part....she feels a huge sense of indebtedness and gratitude for them. I also understand keeping a clean house (though she tells me back in the RP, she had a housekeeper) but she's almost obsessive about it. She'll say how she's tired, wishes she had some time for just her to relax....but she won't allow herself the time to do that. 2) She is incredibly hard on herself. Looks, bass playing, cooking...you name it, somehow she thinks she's substandard at it. Despite all evidence to the contrary. For Halloween she hand-sewed (despite never having done it before) a costume for her youngest boy. I don't know if any of you are familiar with the "Assassin's Creed" video game, but she made the hero's costume, which is pretty elaborate and detailed. Now I can see her saying "Well, it's not perfect", but holy cow.....it came out really, really good. Certainly FAR better than any "first timer" should have a right to expect. Close up....okay, the detail is not 'perfect', the seams not arrow-straight, etc. etc. but from any distance, it looked superb. But she goes on about how she screwed it up, etc. etc. Re-reading this, I suspect it isn't just Filipinas who do this. LOL But maybe you all know something I don't. LOL
    3 points
  10. From my visit to my girls parents on Mindoro, it's cheap in the sticks, mainly because there is not that much to buy. I was lucky I could get broadcom internet at my girls parents home or I would have been going through technology withdrawls. I paid their 412 piso electric bill for the month I stayed there. The internet cost me 1,400 piso for the month, which I think compared to the electricity is a fair example of how the greater cost for nearly up to date technology. The motorcycle I bought is only slightly more complicated than a clawhammer and probably does not give up much in reliability to the hammer either. There was a great little resort in Pinamalayan that cost all of a dollar a head for the day with showers and renting a kubo, they put an umbrella on the beach for us also for shade, 5 piso per song on the karaoke machine. Nearest movie theatre was 2 hours away. I handled it fine for a month but I would like to live a good bit closer to a sizeable city. If you could live a life that simple, I think you could do it for $500 a month (in a decent native house with fan and sleep under mosquito net) which would allow you to retain your savings for a comfortable cushion for emergencies if you had $1,000 or more per month. It's just not for me long term.
    3 points
  11. I have also heard the same, when I was in the Phils talking with my friend and told her my plan to re-locate there, and as I am an older single guy, I asked her would $1000 a month be ok to live on, her reply was easy peasy. I don't hit the bars, but like a beer, not a womaniser, but like woman. I know I can get a reasonable place to live for around 7000 pesos a month. Where I am here I don't spend a thousand a month so I can't see why I would have a problem there, so in 7 weeks I will see what the out come is, good luck to you, have a good one.
    3 points
  12. Bruce and I have been in email communication. We are trying to raise money to buy seeds for farmers affected by Typhoon Yolanda. The distribution will start late January or early February 2014. I am sending the message below to everyone on my email contact list. If you would like to help us, please do the same. A Basic Need for Typhoon Yolanda Victims. Small farmers lost their seeds for next year's planting. The super typhoon destroyed their coconut, banana, papaya and citrus trees. Philippine Basic Needs, a small 501 ( c ) ( 3 ) not-for-profit corporation based in Florida is helping by purchasing replacement seeds. I will be directly involved with the distribution during my visit to the Philippines in early 2014. If you would like to help distribute seeds to needy farmers, please send a contribution through PayPal or a check to: Philippine Basic Needs 6798 Stirling Road Hollywood, Florida 33024 WEB: www.philippinebasicneeds.com
    3 points
  13. ....but are there some places in the RP to just flat-out avoid? I asked my friend Wil, a Filipino, if he'd retire to the Philippines. "No, I'd go to Thailand" he replied. "There is a lot of violence in the RP". The US is a dangerous country. There are places I wouldn't be at high noon, let alone after dark, and I avoid those places. But I also have the ability to defend myself and my home....something I'd lack in the RP Now first, let me say this is not meant to be an insult or smear on any part of the country, or anyone's religion. But the fact remains that relations between some adherents of Christianity and Islam are "strained". Due to this, I've basically written off the idea of the southern areas of the RP (western Mindanao, etc). I figure with 7K+ islands, there's plenty of room for everyone. But where else? Every urban area is going to have areas that are worse for crime than others, so what I'm looking for is provinces where a rather average American seeking to blend in as much as possible could avoid political/criminal/religious violence. At this early point in my "research", I've limited myself to looking north of Manila...Central Luzon and northward. What are those areas like, as far as crime?
    2 points
  14. You were faster than I telling it :) One thing to add is because of Bisayan is almost as big as Tagalog in being the LOCAL language, some Bisayan speakers are grumpy Tagalog got that advantage compared to Bisayan, so some of them don't want to speak Tagalog, although they can :) That's a reason I haven't bothered to start studying, before I have decided where to settle. Only reason I went into such depth is that when I asked SAO here most spoken tongue the reply was "Bisaya". Now I went on to try to find something to try to learn what I thought, was a single language... This opened up the can of worms I wrote about above! I finally narrowed it down by asking SAO if she gets on ok speaking in Bacolod City, it's the closest major city... She replied "Sort of". I then asked how it was in Cebu City for her... "Yes! That's it". Wiki saved me!! Oh you "cheated" by asking SAO and wiki :)
    2 points
  15. The motorcycle is a Suzuki GD 110. It has alot of low end torque for it's displacement, gets about 100 miles per gallon even while I was breaking it in. The major selling point was that it has an oil filter as so many small bikes do not. Not a speed demon by any means but more than adequate when the limit on the national highway is 60 KPH around Socorro on Mindoro even though the road is in surprisingly good shape. The GD is used for trikes in that area but if I were to bolt a sidecar to mine, my rear sproket would have 20% more teeth and the pretty chain guard would be history. I like how quier it is, my mothers sewing machine was louder : )
    2 points
  16. We lived in Cebu City for about 5 years and never had a car until we were getting ready to move to Bacolod .... we had to use a taxi as I'm not comfortable riding on jeepneys .... as I'm on SS my monthly income didn't change .... when my asawa went out by herself she took a jeepney .... here in Bacolod we can go just about anywhere for about p125 ($2.90) one way .... if Cebu if i remember correctly it was about p150 most of the time .... Our small SUV runs us about p1000 for diesel per month but of course that doesn't include repairs or tag .. license etc. ..... but it does give us more freedom .... we bought it for under p150,000 ( $3488) ..... but you better know your cars and check around .... JMHO :cheersty:
    2 points
  17. Absolutely no bloody good at all, you're quite right. I bet some of those shot were of the type who responded without thought. Taken by surprise, one would act instictively, and if the instinct is to defend yourself you're probably dead already.
    2 points
  18. Here they speak Tagalog, Ilongo, and some English. But my girlfriend is from Antique and speaks Kiniray-a as well. So I will never learn enough.
    2 points
  19. Yes, but the vast majority are not cared for. They may belong to someone, but they are either allowed to run free or chained up as guard or bark dogs. In both cases they are usually dirty and mangy. I think that depends on your area and how you care for your dog. If you live in a poor area and let your dog run free, he might not come home one day. Especially if he is well fed! :hystery: If you care for your dog and keep him on a leash, he should be fine. If you are in a nicer area, you will find that many people have indoor dogs and take good care of them. Shih Tzu, Pugs, Beagles and Chihuahua are very popular. Here is Subic Bay Freeport, you see Shih Tzu being carried around in the malls a lot. I never thought I would like a dog like that, but they are great little dogs! In our neighborhood, it is against the rules to let your dog run free, but still many do on our street. However, I would say they are "higher class" street dogs. Not quite as dirty and mangy all the time. In fact, "our dog" is not really our dog. He is our neighbor's Dachshund and he is a great dog, so we enjoy having George spend time with us. He runs free most of the time. He is BFF with our cat Blackie. We adopted Blackie as a street kitty when he was tiny, and he has grown into a really cool cat. He thinks he is a dog. He likes to ride in the car and will jump in on his own sometimes. He likes to put his head out the window and smell the wind. A few days ago, Abby and I went for a morning walk, and Blackie followed us for the entire walk, out and back!
    2 points
  20. There might be another reason why your Filipino friends may prefer to retire in Thailand. All his relatives are going to hound him for gift money; medical emergency; loans that will never be repaid; college tuition; etc. As the rich Americano, he is on top of the totem pole, which means taking care of everyone below.
    2 points
  21. where is the service located in dallas? can you drop off or they pick up? Forex does not have an office in Dallas. Nearest one is Houston. I went to a Filipino guys apartment, near Lake Ray Hubbard, and picked up the boxes. He came and picked them up from my house after they were packed. Seemed kind of odd - but it worked.
    2 points
  22. Simple answer ''No" Foreigners are disliked by the unsavoury sorts and if it boils down to them or you, guess who get's popped off. Guns are rife in RP and be sure a thief will be a likely candidate to carry one. Its just not worth it. What good is a gut reaction if you get a bullet counter-reaction????
    2 points
  23. The Philippines are very peculiar when it comes to a marriage consumated in RP. There is no divorce as such, only annulment so any relationship you may have with needs to be handled with tact. I've heard of stories of Foreigners getting sued for adultery even though the husband and wife are no longer in a close relationship. Annulment is expensive and time consuming but love will always find a way. Just wanted to give you the heads up
    2 points
  24. Like you said, there are lots of places to not go just like the States. Every place has it's inherent risks, some more than others. Natural events include; volcanic, typhoon, flooding (depending upon where you settle), earthquakes, tsunami and the very infrequent tornado. If you choose the central Philippines (Visayas), you will find yourself always dealing with Typhoons (not always a direct hit). Luzon gets them too but not as frequently as the Visayas. Mindanao and south, rarely get Typhoons (even then it's usually the northern and eastern coasts). On security, avoid the mountainous areas where the NPA frequent, avoid 90% of Mindanao (Davao, Cagayan de Oro, Dipolog & Surigao are relatively safe), 100% of the Sulu Archipelego. If you use some simple street common sense you can avoid the wrong places to be. For me, the safest place that I have found is the Subic Freeport. The old US Naval base. It is like a huge gated community with plenty of restaurants, shops and a mall. I have absolutely zero worries about crime here.
    2 points
  25. I live 7 hours by bus north of Manila in the mountain city of Baguio. A city of 300,000 at 5,000 feet elevation with a cool moderate climate. I have lived here almost 7 months now and have made many posts on this forum about Baguio. Here is a link to a forum thread regarding safety in Baguio: http://www.philippines-expats.com/topic/13237-safe-in-baguio/ Use this search link to browse my other Baguio posts: http://www.philippines-expats.com/index.php?app=core&module=search&search_in=forums Then enter the search term Baguio, find author earthdome and display as posts. Then click Search Now.
    2 points
  26. Yes I will , I plan to keep a very accurate diary of all my expenses so can post for any one interested, one thing I have learnt is to have a friend there to help with any items you need to buy, they all seem to have a friend that can help or a friend of a friend. I do know what I spend here for a night out at a reasonable restaurant, in the Phils it is a fraction of the price, I did post this before, but to give you some indication of the price difference, a packet of 30 cigs here 820 pesos, in the Phils 40 pesos.
    2 points
  27. Nothing really changes here. But if and when they ever do it will take a much better leader then Mr Aquino. Anyone who doubts there is a failure of leadership should watch the Amanpour interview. Not one straight answer; excuses, excuses, blame others.
    2 points
  28. Friends have been asking how to help Typhoon Yolanda victims. Yesterday, I switched from recommending the Philippine Red Cross and Ayala Foundation to Bruce's Philippine Basic Needs. For Americans, it is an IRS recognized 501 ( c ) ( 3 ) not for profit corporation. You can deduct a significant portion of your donation as a charitable contribution. Media attention has been focused on Tacloban and Ormoc. The destruction is more widespread. Other areas have also suffered including Samar. With Bruce, a member of this forum, we are assured ALL the money and any goods sent will be given to needy families. His website is: http://www.philippinebasicneeds.com/
    2 points
  29. Most of the thanks should go to James who has risked his life and the lives of his family members to do what is right and help ensure justice is served in this horrible crime.
    2 points
  30. I hope no one takes offence at what I am about to write as it is actually meant as a compliment to those who are actively contributing to this thread. This thread is like an old book, that I never quite finished but never wanted to throw away. Every time this thread comes up, I need to go back a few pages to "refresh" my now diminishing grey cells in my brain. This thread is one that I always open, to keep updated on. This thread shows why this forum is with out doubt, the best for those wanting to visit, or live here. This thread shows that there are people who care, and that you are not alone in the wilderness, (or provinces, for those who live here) This thread, presents some of our members in the best possible light, and how as expats we can help support each other...., during life, and even after death. Thank you to all those who continue to contribute to this thread. Papa Carl
    2 points
  31. i have also recommended Bruce's Philippines Basic needs program to my friends who asked as well , keep up the great work Bruce !! O-U-C :thumbsup:
    2 points
  32. I'll chime in with a note about Wi-Tribe 4G If you need to view the most recent versions of ANY frequently visited website (e.g. website design) do not under ANY circumstances use wi-tribe! .. Reason: They cache the internet pages at an ISP level so they can serve them locally to their customers without any external bandwidth cost/loss of speed. Their cache is almost never cleared, this is in an effort to make loading speeds appear faster than they actually are. I spent literally 20+ hours with on the phone to technicians, customer service, managers etc before getting the answers and informing them of how to fix the issues. (I was tempted to send them a consultancy bill!) We are currently on Globe DSL the past 3 years, which has been the most stable connection I've used over here with no drop in speed (metro manila).
    1 point
  33. Hi, I have fast read the posts on this thread,So I may have missed it but has anyone mentioned your visa fees? plus the cost of transport be it purchasing a vehicle [ very overpriced here] or allowing budget for taxi which are cheap, but not so cheap if your living on 1000USD, the novelty soon wears of from Jeepneys. John
    1 point
  34. :) Allen, all well and good until you come and spend a lot of time here or maybe more so, when you retire. When I used to come over for 2/3 months at a time things were always OK. It really is the time you want things, need things, that are just not available as easy as at Home or even as cheaply, that will bring it all home. I love this Place dearly but my Western ways come out big style, when I just can't get what I want/need when I want them or more importantly, at the right price. This is when the long nose tax comes in, There is always some one, a cousin a Brother-in-law Friend or a friend of a friend to help you out, at of course, your expense, OH! don't get me wrong, I am not going to knock my chosen Family or Friends, Life, is a business here and everything has a value. There are two types here, us and Them (Filipino or Foreigner) the Western Foreigner is and will always, be a target. over the years it has always been that way. the Locals know how we ran our lives when at home and earning the money for our retirement I lived in Spain for nigh on 20 years and they are just the same (the Spanish that is) The Filipinos are just continuing where the Spanish left off, lets screw all, while making sure we do not get screwed ourselves. (The Spanish taught our hosts well and have a lot to answer for) Harsh words, No, True words. All to many times, I see and hear those from Europe The US and AUS even the Chinese Trying to be a Big Fish in a small sea, Wrong of course, we are medium fish in a Vast Ocean. If we just try and keep our Western ways curbed a little, blend in some. Stop trying to mend something that is not broken we might just get a little sympathy and have them look on us as People and not just an ATM or cash Cow. It is not just about eating out or the Golf days that I mean as Western Ways, it is having an understanding of how they view us. We come from a world of safety features on everything, from electric to lights on Bikes. If, we want all these things that we were brought up with, it will cost. I built my house last year, I could have done it for far less but I wanted some added things I knew I would miss from the UK, so I had them put in at a greater cost than i thought it would be So what I am trying to say is, any Western thoughts put into action, is going to cost I hope Allen, that this is all making sense to you, When you eventually move here, I am sure you will remember and more readily understand what, we are all trying to say to you now. Seeing is believing, only when you live here, will you come to terms with what you read from People who have done it and live with it. Whatever you choose, I wish you well my friend. Just come with an open mind and think more Filipino and less Westerner. It will be cheaper :thumbsup: :tiphat:
    1 point
  35. Yes I agree, this is a very good philosphy to follow. However, my biggest scare are the situations when I simply must have everything with me that I need for international travel (passport, money, credit cards, etc.) Certainly I would say I can't afford losing my passport, money, and credit cards all at once. As I will be traveling around Philippines quite frequently in the near future, I can see myself in this kind of situations fairly often.
    1 point
  36. Yeah, I am right outside Iloilo and can speak to almost no one. Saying the kids learn English in school is like saying we were taught Spanish in school... got past the test and forgot everything! It seemed better when i was in the Navy - but I am sure it was because I was closer to the base. Out in the province even then was probably no better. But my girlfriend was reading this over my shoulder and asked if i knew what tuba was. I had never heard of it so she takes outside and points to a coconut tree with a bottle attached to it... that is tuba... learn something new everyday. :tiphat:
    1 point
  37. I found the restaurants there were very good value for money, 3 of us went to Lantaw, great location and for a seafood dinner in a perfect setting was 1400 pesos in total with a few beers, this is only me, but I am not a big steak eater, more on seafood, fruit and vegies that are very cheap compared to what I am used to here, as for the wine, I did buy a bottle of aussie Moscata around the same price as in the stores here.
    1 point
  38. Well that's the great thing about this forum, lot's of good advice from guy's on the ground. I really think you need some one local to help you there or it would become a nightmare trying to sort things out. I am not trying to put any one's nose out of joint but like Allen can some one explain to me this western lifestyle that is always mentioned.
    1 point
  39. LOL "If that were the case"....that was more than a few years ago, I'm afraid. Her father passed, she's here now with her boys in West Virginia. She does okay, but a far cry from having live-in help. As I recall, her mother and her brother still live in the RP. Not sure about their situation. Regardless, moving in with her isn't an option....not that I would mind. LOL
    1 point
  40. Well it's more complicated than you may think mate. The official languages are Filipino (standardised Tagalog) and English. All kids are taught Tagalog in school and is spoken as a first language around major urbanised areas especially on Southern Luzon and around Manila. English taught in schools as well and is spoken everywhere to lesser extents depending on the age of the person and where you are (those over 50 weren't taught it as a compulsory subject at school). The further into the provinces you delve, the harder it is the understand. English and Tagalog vie for dominance as the language of business and higher education. Bisayan is a language group with the most common dialect being Cebuano used mainly in the Central Visayas (centred on Cebu) and Eastern and Northern Mindanao. After than that in order of number of speakers you have Ilokano (Northern Luzon), Hiligaynon (Western Visayas), Waray-Waray (Samar and Northern Leyte), Bicolano (SE Luzon), Pampango (Pampanga) and Pangasinense also recognised in the constitution as auxiliary official regional languages. Add to that, sub-dialects, local tribal languages, Arabic and Spanish and it all does your head in. Admittedly some of (and only a couple) the above are major dialects of Bisaya and Tagalog but most are languages in their own rights. But to answer your question TV is in Tagalog with a fair bit of English. The regional languages dominate in their region as the main language spoken by the locals. That clear things up for you? :tiphat: Here's a picture:
    1 point
  41. Robert, were you a 45B?!?! I did that for my first few years in the WV ARNG. Fun job, so long as I actually worked on SMALL arms. Still not sure how the gun on an M109A5 counts as "small". I've been an 11M (Mechanized Infantry) in the regular Army (though even then, I wanted to play with the hardware). I was a 19K (M1 Armor Crewman) with the KY ARNG. Tanks are FUN!!! As mentioned, I was a 45B (Small Arms Repairer) here in WV, then a 91K3O (Armament Repairer), but now I've finally become the total pogue and was recently retrained to be a 42A3O (Human Resources Specialist). This means I know the proper way to format memos. :D
    1 point
  42. OH JESUS that was ...,,,,,,, i guess in this instance prayers did work here is another clip but a little more longer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rS0gv4Xbw7w#t=56
    1 point
  43. 1 point
  44. LBC was a great deal in Los Angeles last fall. $55 per box, free drop of free empty boxes and free pickup of full boxes. I just looked at their website and it says California is $60 and Washington is $65 per box. Don't know about the free stuff now.
    1 point
  45. Update: We found out today that Jeffery Parian has been transferred to the Surigao Silop prison facility were Jerome Devocion is being held. They are being kept separate in the prison facility. Johnny Parian is still at large but it will probably only be a matter of time before he will be sharing a roof with Jerome Devocion and brother Jeffery Parian. The Philippine authority is still waiting for the final results of the Canadian authority's handling of the arrest warrant given to INTERPOL's Camp Crome, Manila office well over two months ago, and as of today they have yet received conformation that Ottawa, Canada has received the arrest warrant issued by the Surigao City courts from any Canadian authority. Once the arrest warrant has been formally severed by the appropriate Canadian authority on Jane Doyle (suspected mastermind) then the Surigao City courts can finally move forward to the next stage of the process. So as it stands today we have two suspects down, one hiding in fear of capture, and one planning for a nice quite x-mas holiday in Canada.
    1 point
  46. Be Careful as wife might get the box meant for girlfriend. Sorry but can't help myself :hystery:
    1 point
  47. I like this ............I think ? :unsure: mmmm 4'11 and 42kg. She keeps me in line, which, to be honest, I need sometimes. My ex-wife wrecked my life, SAO gave me back my faith in women.
    1 point
  48. Not exactly sure but I am fairly certain I want to avoid any ATMs he has used! :hystery:
    1 point
  49. Isn't that amazing that English is the de facto spoken and written language among many nations. Most if not all airport control and flight towers are spoken in English. When our military allies play with us during at sea battle games, English is the name of the game. With one exception, we sideline the Royal Australian Navy because nobody could understand their English! Damn Aussies...... The relearning of my native tongue when I returned back to the islands in 1990 was a sharp learning curve for me. I'm an old dog and refused or too damn lazy to relearn different mechanics for my mouth and tongue. However, when I thought I had it down pat, the vendors immediately detected my American accent. So I kept my mouth shut and resorted to Taglish speaking to my extended family and friends. Eventually, I wasn't treated like a bobo anymore and they also appreciate my spontaneous misuse of certain Tagalog words or custom. For example....when you approach the front door of your Filipino neighbor, you would normally say Tao po, meaning you're announcing your presence by saying -- hey, there's people here visiting you. I kind of twisted the thought around by yelling Tae po, tae po. My nieces are busting their guts laughing at my twisted mind -- (Ask BrettGC what tae means). Oh yeah, I have intimate experience with all the nasty Tagalog words and phrases. My wife Judy would yell at me using that P word, to be followed by -- go to your doghouse. Tongue tied -- Jake
    1 point
  50. If you get married in Arkansas and divorced in California, are you still cousins?
    1 point
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