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  1. The good thing in this situation is it protects us against gossip, or worse, as well. Heck I usually invite a friend too, at least until I know her better and then only one chaperon of either her or my choosing. That way no one can say I was inappropriate in anything I said or did. Hey guys, Allow me to further explain my courtship with my wife Judy. She was 19 at the time and I was 34, still active US Navy. After our harrowing experience dealing with Yakuza in Fukuya, Japan we arrived safely back to her hometown of Batangas City. I had no friends there and very little usage of the Tagalog language. Only two weeks remaining of my military leave, I really didn't push the idea of marriage. I can see through Judy's heart was not ready for me. In retrospect, I believe she felt obligated to accept me because we escaped together from Japan. And so the courtship begins. Usually the young Filipino has a go between, another barkada who is also well respected by the girl and her family -- very important. He facilitates the courtship because he already decided that it would be a perfect match. I didn't have that privilege who can speak for me when I'm shy asking the girl out. In my case, Judy's older sister (by one year) decided that she would be the ultimate decision whether I'm accepted or not, in spite of Judy and I already had intimate relationship in Japan. Judy's sister Joy followed us around, I'm at back following them however (nice view, by the way) while they tsismis about me. Sometimes they would meet up with their college batch mates and I usually pick up the tab. They never talk to me but apparently, they know all about me -- a Filipino that can't speak any Tagalog, except for the nasty words. Yeah that's me, a dollar speaking Filipino. Nearing the end of my leave, here comes this guy, obviously drunk with his barkada and giving me the snake eyes. I was already warned by Ate Joy that he was the former boyfriend of Judy. I held my ground, not saying a word but my body language said it all. Later that day, Ate Joy asked me how did it go? My answer was immediate -- over my dead body. It could have been a test to observe my reaction. Apparently, my resolve of protecting my Judy was the only answer that Joy would accept. And then another test was presented to me. How does one act when he see two sisters nearly naked walking right in front of him? Obviously a trick to break my integrity but I almost failed. It was really torture to the point where it hurts so good. My courtship was never about finding Mrs Right. It was the traditional Filipino courtship that announced finally, I was the right one. The final step was to get official permission from the family matriarch -- her dreaded Lola. Peace of cake. I bribed her with a bag of imported chocolate to get approval for Judy's hand in marriage (yeah I know, the devil made me to it). Was I nervous? Hell, ya.....sweatin' bullets until I finally got on that 747 heading back to San Diego. Several months later, Judy and I were married in San Diego in 1985. Still goin' strong, approaching our 30th year together. Viagra is my priend......he, he.
    8 points
  2. if you can hard wire your main computer to your router, Do it. You can lose up to 40 % of your speed using wireless.
    4 points
  3. During our last visit I liked to go for a walk every morning. When I walked by the trike stand I'd greet them with a "good morning". After a week or so one of the trike drivers asked, "Are you poor? I told him," Not poor but not rich either." I asked him, "Why do you ask?" He said, "We thought you were poor because you walk everywhere."
    4 points
  4. Hey Bob, sorry to hear about your special someone, but I know from your posts that things will work out for you, either with her or with someone else. you have a great attitude, and if there is one thing I do know, it is that there are a great number of Filipinas looking for a nice guy to be with. If you get up Angeles way, be sure to let me know, it will be great to meet up with a fellow Canuck and show you around. Papa Carl
    4 points
  5. "Until Now" quite often with many references or activities. She said she never knew how to swim until now. Okay then lets go swimming. Meaning she never learned to swim. I was really confused for a long time and still she uses "until now" at the end of a sentence. But now I understand her meaning. Also still using he or she interchangeably. I learned early on that in Tagalog there is no he and she. Hence the confusion for many.
    3 points
  6. There's two questions here: are Filipinos nosy or curious about personal details - the answer is a big yes; the next question is what to do about it. However, I want to re-frame the discussion a bit. I am old enough to have lived in the tail end of an era in the U.S. when the culture was far more communal and people knew about everyone's business. Everyone sat on the stoop and gabbed and everyone knew everything. Who you were screwing? Everyone knew. What your job was (and probably what you made)? Everyone knew. Who was having marital problems? Everyone knew. The list could go on and on. Today we live in a culture where we are a bit isolated and know nothing about each other. I've lived in my home 8 years and would be hard pressed to tell you the names of more than a few of my neighbors, let alone what they do, how much they make, etc. I suspect that one of the things that many of us like about the Philippines is the communal culture we no longer have in the West. But there is good and bad to that; most everyone's friendly and wants to know your name; but they are also keenly interested in everything else about you. We were in my wife's hometown of Alcoy in April at a local hotel. My wife left for the day (she must have asked me 50 times whether it would be OK) to help prepare for a party. I went into the restaurant alone at lunchtime. The waitress looked at me surprised and asked "where is your wife?" Now yes, in the U.S. this would be considered intrusive and personal; even rude. I looked sad and said, "She left me," then smiled and said "joke." The exact same thing happened at dinner. I absolutely think it's my right to keep my personal affairs personal if I feel like it. But I don't feel offended when someone wants to know more about me.
    3 points
  7. Hello, Gentlemen, I thought I would share a bit of my life with you regarding my experience with Internet dating-bitter sweet to say the least. My story begins when I had been chatting with a very poor gal from Paranaque who was using an internet cafe. Well. long story short, we hit it off. She was the sweetest most honest, precious lady I met and asked nothing from me. She had deep beautiful eyes and spoke with a smoothness, I really can't accurately describe. Rromance and beauty dominated this quiet woman's every being when I went to see her. I brought her a certain type of perfume found only in Victoria Secret which she always dreamed of having. We had the best 2 weeks together I could imagine. The days were full of joy, the nights with passion-we both fell so deeply in love. When I had to go back a taxi drove us to the airport, where we said our sad good byes but she knew I was going to get to work on sponsoring her (K-1), so we could be together -married, happy, the whole bit-life was finally becoming what I only dreamed it would be. Little did I know, it was the last time I would ever see her in person. Fast forward, I got her a laptop so we could communicate on Skype while waiting for the paperwork to go through. She lived in a room spacer above a store, so she was as poor as a church mouse, but I supplied her needs and she hung in there very well. Her happiness and contentment was in our love more than the squaller she had to endure so she said to save my money for our life together. 2 months into the visa process, after complaining of stomach pains, I told her to go to the doctor. She had ovarian cancer (stage 1-so they said anyway). I borrowed from my 401K to get her the chemo, radiation, and medicine needed to fight the cancer. I told her-be strong-for us. She was indeed!! In the course of 5 months it spread to the bone. Once it traveled up her spine to her brain-that was it. All this painful time watching her fight this took about 6 months. I felt completely helpless. I could not travel to see her because every bit of money I could get went to her treatments so we talked on Skype through her ups and downs. I can't even describe what it felt like to see each day her regressing like she did-but she fought and fought. Toward the end-on Skype-while she was in the hospital room, I told her I will never forget our love and will carry it with me for the rest of my days. She smiled and could barely speak and said-"Please don't cry-I will be with God soon". That was our last communication. Her sister told me the next day-as her 83 yr old mother held her in her arms, "Tell Steve I love him.". Then she expired. I saw (on her Skype) her body in state at her family's house. The perfume was next to her with pictures of us together. This is how she was buried. Her dream, and my dream of being together---was over. I never felt such pain in my life. She was a true angel-the joy of my life. I had bought her a fancy coffee cup when I was there-and she gave me her plain yellow one in return which I use her every day. It took me about year of healing before I reasoned out that I needed to move forward in my quest for love-and Adhel encouraged me to do so before she died. I searched again and this time found Annie. She's a cute, bubbly, little filipina gal that I met, love, and married. We are very happy to this day-and I know Adhel is looking down at me smiling that I am happy now. The two are special in their own way-kind of like the best steak compared to the best Ice Cream-nothing alike but both wonderful. In closing, I want to say, I know the tricks of the trade and what to look out for -how to avoid a fake-and all that. I was never a victim of a scam, but, for all those who feel victimized, I share this to inspire you not to give up on these women. There's good and bad everywhere-and in some ways a scam victim feels the pain in the wallet. Money can be replaced. Thank you for reading my story and I hope God grants each of you a long life of love with your Filipina-we never know when the end will come.
    2 points
  8. Hello, My name is Jeff and am new to this forum. I spent many years in the Philippines and believe it or not, with only one woman. I was always on a "Trip" going somewhere in Islands, this was back in the early 80's. To make a long story short, the lady I spent my time with did not speak much English but she understood it fine - except when it came time for me to come home. I made all the arrangements that she would have to do and how to contact me "collect" in those days. Remember this was before they all had sim cards and cell phones. Anyway, I would always meet her in Olongapo usually before I even went to the place to have someone go tell her I was there. I don't know how she knew I was coming because most of the time, I didn't know I was coming. She was not a Bar Fly so that always confused me. Anyway, I want to find her. She could be in the states or still in PI. Her home in PI was Infanta, Pangasinan and she went by the American name of Edna Muega Mila but her real name was Mercedes Muega Mila. I'm sure I am posting in the wrong place but if someone could help me find the right place, I would be happy to repost there. (That's right, I'm a newbie to here). Anyway, there is a reward of $500usd for anyone who can put us in touch with each other. First to post on here and send me an email gets the money. Thanks for any assistance. Jeff Conz. USN
    2 points
  9. The stuff we are seeing on the streets is more closely related to crystal meth, in most cases because the way it is prepared by the backyard chemists, more potent than the ICE we see in Australia.
    2 points
  10. I'm 18 and my Kano is 61. We have been a couple for 1 year and quite happy. He is a polite gentleman when we are out and a tiger at home in the bedroom! I wouldn't trade him for anyone!
    2 points
  11. Dave I am going to assume that you have tested the ethernet cable already. It could be the port / card on your laptop or router. Does your router have multiple ports? Here in the US I have called the cable people out and the subcontractors they send out are inferior to monkeys, I check my own equipment. I even had one of the monkeys sent to my house try to plug my power supply into a router he brought without even looking to see if the power supply was compatible, it wasn't. You might have to haul your cable and laptop to someone elses house and see if you get a wired connection, or maybe a shop could do it for you. Dave, on another topic, I have been thinking about your telling that your laptop battery pack has failed. Inside many laptop battery packs there are multiple common individual batteries. If you can open the battery pack up, you may find it is full of Samsung 18650 batteries, the same as in a quality portable phone charger/battery bank. Most likely the batteries would be connected just like AA batteries but there may be a dab of epoxy to hold them in place. If the pack is not working, I would figure what do I have to lose doing some surgery on it. The 18650 batteries can be found in some e-bikes, just more of them. The batteries may be available seperate. Just some thoughts.
    2 points
  12. I work for Homeland Security and I tell all the Pinays/Pinoys I know you have got to declare the money. There is nothing that they can do if you declare it. If you do not declare it and the catch you - goodbye life savings. I don't know why they are so hard headed. Especially with the emphasis now on combating bulk cash smuggling (easily construed as ill gotten gains from drugs, etc).
    2 points
  13. well, there have been a numberf of cases reported in the Philippines newspapers recently of children, now in their forties, trying to find their Filipina nanny and usually suceeding. You have her name and her home town. There should be a record of her there. She is presumably Ilocana if she comes from Pangasinan and that is a help as the Ilocanos are above average clannish and inclined to keep in contact with their home town. I would suggest Googling Infanta, Pangasinan, as a first step and advertising on their local wesbiste and/or newspaper - most towns in Northern Luzon have both. the human interest in the story may get it picked up
    2 points
  14. My wife and I sent off a big, heavy Balikbayan box last week from the mid west (US) to her large family. Her family asked how much was the value of the contents? Basically I said somewhere between $100 and $500. I was so vague it really did not give them an idea. I always answer personal probing questions with vague answers. (50 shades of grey).They want fuel for the chizmiz which is ok as long as I feel the love from the family, I can deal with this side. Oh yea,,they asked when the next box will be sent after this one. I said to them-as soon as you send that same empty one back to me, I will gladly refill it, Joe-Joe! (crazy foreigner-aren't I?-they love humor though)
    2 points
  15. Sorry Bob, I know how much that hurts. But if it was her choice and she couldn't see something special in you then that is her problem. It is hard to accept, trust me I know, but maybe in the end it is all for the best. Eventually you will find someone who appreciates you and she will be much better!
    2 points
  16. Concerning economical questions, how about? /wife/gf answers: "My man handle such" /and we old men can say "don't remember" or "what's that?" and blame senility :lol:
    2 points
  17. There's one point that I believe some here have missed because some posters have explained how they haven't been asked many personal questions which is correct for most foreigners. Its the girlfriend or wife who is inundated with personal questions on a regular basis. And, since she grew up in the Philippines she may not realize that they are personal questions and therefore she shouldn't answer them. And, if she doesn't realize that they are personal and intrusive questions then she may not tell you about the questioning. You may only know about the personal questioning if you ask her questions. The only questions Filipinos have asked me are where are you going? And, where is Manilyn? Manilyn is the one who has been asked many personal questions and the questions never end. Just last night Manilyn was telling me that people keep asking her how much is my retirement every month and how much do we have saved in the bank? She hates to lie but if she tells them the truth it could make us or our home a target for robbers. And, if she says its personal so I cant tell you then they will get mad at her, which is very stupid in my opinion.
    2 points
  18. Thanks a lot, Jake. I really appreciate that. I never saw the kids swimming for coins but I often walk over that bridge nowadays. That's a good description of the batang hamog ("children of the morning dew" - street kids) you have there. I think you are right - we have to start with childhood. I can't speak for other cities, but in Cebu it seems most of the shanty towns surround these large squares of asphalt about the size of a basketball court, which also doubles for a basketball court. Most of the street urchins wagging school, unemployed, and people just with nothing to do, just hang around these areas. On a side note, the very ill also get pushed out into this area. These squares is where we most often pick up patients with TB.
    2 points
  19. Goes for me too Bob. So sorry mate.
    2 points
  20. I will also be back in Cebu in October as well.
    2 points
  21. What can an old digger say other than thank you for reminding us that life is precious.
    2 points
  22. Sorry to hear about that Bob with luck it may all work out in your favour .I will be in Cebu in oct so maybe we can all catch up for a beer or three, As Jack said hang in there mate.
    2 points
  23. Bob i missed this and I am so sorry to hear it. Words fail me here, as I had thought and always hoped yours, would be the Success story of the site. You know, the fairy tale come true. :unsure: Hang in there. :tiphat: JP
    2 points
  24. That is actually Old English advice, passed on to me by my grandmother, who was a genuine Victorian. (One of her other observations, equally true, but surprising, was "Sex won't make a marriage, but it can break one" - I had no idea that young ladies born when Victoria was on the throne had ever heard of sex! Clearly, they had - but she was a farmer's daughter!) Anyway, I think it is really good advice. Meet the family, and pay particular attention to her mother - your prospective mother in law. For one thing, you get to see what your wife will look like, and more important you will get a sense of how she has been brought up. Here's mine: Catalina is an absolute diamond - she has a very fine sense of right and wrong and whilst she is a gentle soul she makes quite sure that everybody knows where she stands on an issue. As a tiny example, I sent some flowers for her and her two daughters - the flowers were not to be opened and put in vases until Kor was there. (She has passed down some good genes, too...) There are obviously Rules for meeting the prospective outlaws for the first time - "mano po" is often a good idea - and you must expect to be asked some serious questions, as well as being hauled off for a male bonding session involving beer or Emperador Light or in my father in law's case, unfortunately for me, Kulafu... But be very sure to know what you are getting into. Are there any "spare children" around? Any grandchildren dumped on Lola? Any of the siblings with step children? How does this family really work?
    1 point
  25. There you have it Mr Canadian......you have already established strong connections from our fellow members living around the Cebu area. Their wife's/GF can really hook you up to some fine college graduates that will knock your socks off. You guys start PM'ing our man Bob to get him kicked started to some awesome blind dates, OK? I must warn you however, those guys from Australia -- they may hook you up with some kangaroo but they are still virgins, I was told. Watch your six, especially around Medic Mike -- he may want to play doctor and probe you where no man has gone before.....he, he. Good morning guys........
    1 point
  26. Thanks, all! Like I was saying before, it's not completely over yet and there is a chance we may get past this. In the meantime, I will have this great opportunity to travel the Philippines and see where life takes me!
    1 point
  27. I have been with Mrs. right for 32 years, I wonder where miss wong is. :hystery:
    1 point
  28. Sunday, August 10, 2014 A 14-YEAR-OLD girl believed to have been used as a drug mule was arrested by police, who confiscated from her an estimated P5.9 million worth of shabu in Labangon, Cebu City last Saturday night. The arrest of Marian (real name withheld) alarmed law enforcers, who say there is a rising trend among drug dealers to let minors do their dirty work. She was caught during a buy-bust operation with large packs of shabu weighing half a kilo combined, the biggest drug haul for an anti-narcotics operation of the Cebu City Police Office (CCPO) this year. Cebu City Vice Mayor Edgar Labella said this serves as a wake-up call for legislators to review the law on juvenile delinquents. Anyone 15 years old or younger is exempted from criminal liability. Those 15 to 18 may be held criminally liable if there’s proof that they acted with discernment in committing a crime. “The amendment of the law is long overdue. Nothing has been done and it has contributed largely to the crimes,” he told Sun.Star Cebu, referring to Republic Act 9344 or the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act of 2006. The buy-bust took place at 8:10 p.m. inside a house rented by the girl’s employer along Balaga Drive. A two-week surveillance operation preceded the bust, police said. Supt. Romeo Santander, head of CCPO’s City Intelligence Branch (CIB), said that a decoy bought a large pack of shabu worth P295,000 from Marian. When the girl handed over the item and received the money (some of which were just paper bills hidden in a stash of real money), Marian was taken by the police. She was alone in the house during that time. The intelligence operatives, together with a team from the Punta Princesa Police Station, then searched the premises and found 12 other large packs of shabu; a stash of shabu placed in a re-sealable bag; a digital weighing scale; and P1,100 cash. Big-timeEach large pack of shabu weighed 25 grams. A gram of shabu is worth at least P11,800, based on estimates by the Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB). When interviewed by Sun.Star Cebu, Santander said they learned of Marian’s activity through intelligence monitoring. “Dili sad ni sila mamaligya ug ginagmay. Mag-depende ra pud siya sa sugo sa iyang amo (This group doesn’t sell small amounts. The girl just follows her employer’s orders),” he said. Santander said the police also suspect Marian had already disposed of another half-kilo of shabu last week, because their intelligence reports indicate she recently got one kilo. Marian was temporarily placed in the Punta Princesa Police Station and will face criminal complaints today for possession and sale of illegal drugs. The police are also mulling a complaint against the girl’s mother. Girls as mules Asked about what happened, Marian said she only got P1,000 from her employer for the transaction. “Wa ko kabawo ing-ana diay kadako (I had no idea the batch was worth a lot more),” she said. Senior Supt. Conrado Capa, deputy regional director for operations of the Police Regional Office (PRO) 7, described the increase use of minors in illegal activities as alarming. “They are supposed to be at school or playing with friends, instead of being exposed to illegal activities,” he said. Last July, two teenage sisters were arrested by police for allegedly peddling Nubain during a buy-bust in Barangay Kamagayan. The girls, 15 and 13, were caught with 63 ampules of Nubain worth P12,600. Nubain or nalbuphine hydrocholoride, a painkiller, was reclassified as a dangerous drug in 2011. Under RA 9344, offenders below 15 can’t be prosecuted and imprisoned in any government jail. Those that are 15 to 18 years old shall be free from criminal liability and subjected to an intervention program under the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), unless there is proof the minor acted with discernment. Second chanceBut Santander said the police will still file a case against Marian, in the hope that what happened will serve as a lesson to others. “Dili gyud ni namo palampason. Gusto ni namo mahimo nga sample para sa uban nga dili sila basta basta makagamit ug mga bata (We won’t let this opportunity slip. We want others to take notice that they cannot just use children for their activities),” he said. Meanwhile, the DSWD said the agency is willing to assist the 14-year-old girl. She has to be placed in a facility where she will be safe, said Grace Yana, DSWD 7 social worker for children. Yana said that the girl will be assessed by a social worker in Barangay Labangon. The social worker in charge of the girl’s case will have to seek help from the Cebu City Government or from a private organization in looking for shelter for the teenager. Either the social worker or the arresting officers can apply for a court order to have the girl placed in a rehabilitation facility. In Cebu City, one such facility for minors is Operation Second Chance. http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/local-news/2014/08/10/teen-guarded-p6m-shabu-359033 Shabu is really starting to be a big problem in this country.
    1 point
  29. Feeling a little frustrated at moment. Wonder how many others have my experience or am I guilty of the just me syndrome. Decided after discovering some beautiful scenic roads up and beyond Canlaon time to buy a go pro. So, living here prefer give business locally. First go on ayosDito, found quite a few of the exact model I prefer. Wrote to several shops as prefer buy new, also sent some texts out. Just asking basic questions about the product and payment method. Shortly after followed up a couple on trade me NZ, similar questions. My brother is arriving end of month so no problem to bring it. Couple of days later, zero replies from Manila shops, Zero texts returned. Trade Me NZ every question answered, followed by in some cases a further mail encouraging me to buy. Guys we all acknowledge service here sucks but one could surely expect some reaction from major Manila shops..... Reminds me of trying to book hotels, rarely if ever have I received a reply. On the occasion a reply received, unless you have their letter in hand chances are hotel has no record of booking. Maybe somebody has an answer to the long exhausted question why oh why???
    1 point
  30. You have tried the wired when the wireless adapter is switched off.
    1 point
  31. Sorry Bob to hear about the problems you are having with you're special someone, hope things work out for you, hang in there mate and good luck
    1 point
  32. When my wife's little sister was younger we instructed her not to answer money questions or what hotel we were at or our timetable this especially for some family members when in Leyte. As my children got older we did the same with them.
    1 point
  33. Hey Scott, Shabu is methamphetamine hydrochloride similar to what we call here in CA -- ice or crystal meth. One G (gram) of Shabu cost around 1500 pesos (60 bucks) around the early 90's. These days I believe it's ten times that. It's a white crystalize piece that you can cut into smaller pieces. It is usually smoked like this: His right fingers are holding a long wick, a very thin rolled up toilet about a foot long. You can use a lighter but why waste the fluid. The aluminum trough is angled downward, as the rock melts and slowly slides down to the end, leaving a white residue. You inhale the white smoke using a rolled up strip of aluminum foil. The locals call it damo (grass) for pot. The high grade variety comes from the mountains around Baguio. Respectfully -- Jake
    1 point
  34. Thanks a lot, Jake. I really appreciate that. I never saw the kids swimming for coins but I often walk over that bridge nowadays. That's a good description of the batang hamog ("children of the morning dew" - street kids) you have there. I think you are right - we have to start with childhood. I can't speak for other cities, but in Cebu it seems most of the shanty towns surround these large squares of asphalt about the size of a basketball court, which also doubles for a basketball court. Most of the street urchins wagging school, unemployed, and people just with nothing to do, just hang around these areas. On a side note, the very ill also get pushed out into this area. These squares is where we most often pick up patients with TB. Every barangay must provide a basketball court. It's in the Constitution. That's why you always find them.
    1 point
  35. Good, one small step. "Dynamite fishing" came in during the Marcos years; Army detachments posted to outlying places taught the locals how to do it, in between eating the locals' rice and screwing the locals' girls. It destroys reefs, and kills everything, of course.
    1 point
  36. Three boxes of illegally caught fish weighing 150 kilos from Daanbantayan were seized by the Provincial Anti-Illegal Fishing Task Force. The boxes of fishes were transported in a passenger bus that was intercepted in Maya, Daanbantayan at 9 a.m last Sunday. Task Force chief Loy Madrigal said the fishes were believed to have been caught through dynamite fishing in the waters of Daanbantayan. No charges were yet filed because the perpetrators remain unknown, he said. http://cebudailynews.inquirer.net/39193/dynamited-fish-seized-in-daanbantayan Dynamite.....LOL...seriously :hystery:
    1 point
  37. Nice groupings but I am not sure that I agree. Families in the first class, who set out to better themselves through education, are rare; they are probably rare in all societies, across the world. I doubt if anyone sets out in life to become a scammer, a criminal or a prostitute; I think that people find themselves adrift and grab what seems to be a "way out", without thinking things through. But I am no criminologist. The gist of my original posting was that nobody accepts a hard frugal life; it is forced on them; they only accept it in the sense of not committing suicide. They are not heroically resigned to their lot; they hate it. They are not heroically resigned to their lot; they hate it. Good morning Andrew, I'm on my 2nd cup of coffee and your statement above just slap me in the face, finally waking me up. Such a profound statement, especially coming from a trim and proper Englishman who have seen many faces of poverty throughout the Far East region. Perhaps we could have a better understanding of poverty in general if we could focus on their early childhood. What it's like to be born starving and often times neglected? What it's like to have no parents and you're living like a street rat? My early childhood in the streets of Olongapo was OK, since my father was making US dollars as a new sailor in the US Navy. I had clothing, a home, brand new rubber shoes (flip flops) and no problems with nothing to eat. Actually, most of my classmates were doing OK -- I really don't remember any destitute looking kids in my elementary school. I did not even think it was unusual to see kids my age, swimming in a river just below the bridge, which was the main gate to the naval base. I didn't realize it was their livelihood to beg for coins thrown from above. Many drunken sailors would purposely toss the piso coin away from the pretty ladies begging for coins. And then the coin divers would try to retrieve those coins at the bottom of Chit River. They usually come up with the coin and a chit-eaten grin (literally). One whiff of that river could really sober up a drunken sailor. I wonder how their life was like? Why can't they have a life like mine. Do they have a choice or no choice at all? And finally, I saw kids (1990) in the streets of Batangas sniffing Rugby. I ask Judy's cousin what was that all about? He said they're sniffing that surface adhesive (looks like yellowish camel snot) so they can reduce their hunger pain. And of course it's very addictive, not to mentioned they are already malnourished and their body and mind are being destroyed from the inside. In the streets of India, Bangladesh and other Asian countries, the rat population eats better than the homeless kids with no hope, no future and with no breakfast again....... Respectfully -- Jake
    1 point
  38. You mean like to open the light? And you never cross the street, you across the street.
    1 point
  39. "If Ever", seems to be popular with many. Which of course means "If you Ever" or could mean, If I Ever, or even If they Ever depending on what or who they are talking about. It does make sense, just never heard it before, and so frequently! Papa Carl
    1 point
  40. Hey Steve, Wow, I'm nodding my head in total agreement with you. It is quite apparent that your ideas and understanding of the Philippines, is not in Kansas anymore.....he, he. Well done, my friend -- Jake
    1 point
  41. "Accomplish" - to fill out a form. These are political: "Table" - verb - to kick a proposal into the long grass. Opposite of UK meaning "Salvage" - verb - to contrive the murder of a political opponent. Much used in the Marcos years "Tap" - verb - to nominate someone for a position. "Epal" - one who takes credit for something that they do not deserve, commonly used of politicians who use tarpaulins (qv) beaing their likeness and the words "A project of..." or similar around a public works sceme such as road repairs, a new bridge, etc. A coinage from Tagalog. "Tarpaulin" - not what you might expect (a cloth to keep the weather off goods) but a vinyl coated canvas printed with a name and lettering as a form of advertising...
    1 point
  42. Paulino is doing his best and so far is winning the hearts of Olongapo. We just went thru 5+ weeks of straight rain and the city didn't flood. Partly due to his efforts to get the rivers dredged (looks about 30-40% done). It will probably take a whole year to complete. This awareness campaign with the Rat catching is good too. How often have you seen people wading thru floodwaters when they really didnt need to be? I have also heard that he is of an honest sort and not corrupted. He still has a few more years to get some real progress started
    1 point
  43. If they ask about my sexlife I just say look at my wife she is always smiling. Perhaps she has a boyfriend I don`t know about! Philippinos are nosy and some questions border on being very rude.
    1 point
  44. You would be amazed of how many of these never make the paper. I always wonder how the news picks the ones they report on.
    1 point
  45. Of the Filipinos I have met and talked to in depth they haven't really asked me any more questions about me that I haven't asked or enquired about with any of my friends, colleagues, acquaintances at some time over the years. And if I meet someone from a different culture, I ask a hell of a lot more questions than what I ask my friends as it helps me to better understand them. Guess that's what the Filipino's are doing when they ask me ... How does one really know if the answer they are hearing is correct anyway? I know a lot of my friends lie about their wages all the time. Some saying the earn more than they actually do to sound big and some understate their wealth as they don't want to be known for this!
    1 point
  46. I would bear in mind that while the apple may not fall far from the tree, they can sometimes roll all the way down the hill. Parents and offspring are not always alike. :tiphat:
    1 point
  47. What this means, of course, is that the burden of poverty is in effect doubled, by the Church itself. To have to admit to being poor is to have to admit that you have done something pretty seriously wrong, and in a society where "face" really matters, that adds immensely to the burden already imposed on you and on your family by poverty. The consequence is that people are desperately sensitive about it, We need to be very, very careful how we handle this. There is another aspect, too. Since God made the poor the way they are, and he made the rich and powerful too, it follows that the rich and powerful, a group which includes ALL foreigners, were given the blessings they enjoy by God. It follows that those blessings should be shared, since they are the result of luck not the result of hard work (and nobody sweating in a field thinks that sitting in an air conditioned office can be "work" of any sort!) "You got it for free, so why can't I have some of it?" I'd gladly share my stuff with you, if I had any to spare like you do!"
    1 point
  48. Well I'll do 3 generations. Firstly SAO (Short Angry One - my girl) SAO the Younger (my 16yo step-daughter-to-be) And the picture I love, SAOY and her Grane chilling on a stinking hot day, yep sneak shot on my part: Love 'em all and they all put up with me; Momma treats my like a wayward but much-loved son :whistling: Funny thing is, they're getting taller by generation: Momma about 4'10, SAO about 5'1 and SAOY 5'3 :89:
    1 point
  49. Hello Hey Steve and Medic Mike, Such painful memories and yet you guys were kind enough to allow us into your most deepest pain and sorrow. I am totally speechless....... Respectfully -- Jake
    1 point
  50. I kind of know how you feel Steve. It has been several years now, but I met a young ED doctor in the course of my job. She was the sweetest and greatest women I have met to this day. We were suppose to get married in June of 1999. Just before Thanksgiving on 1998, she started feeling generally unwell, not eating, etc. etc. She got herself checked out, and found out that she had breast cancer. We were both devasstated as you can imagine. On account of the cancer already been so far along, she had to have one of the breasts removed. Few weeks went by, and she was not getting better. Found that cancer had also spread to one of her ovaries, which was removed as well, by this time we found that the cancer had spread to her stomach, as a result she was finally pronounced as terminal. During this time I was working in Australia, and Heather was working at a hospital at UAB in Alabama. Because of Heather's condition I had applied for long service leave, so I could spend the rest of time she had left with her. She had never been to Australia, and our plan was her to move over here and practice medicine, but this was not to happen. At this time, she was in John Hopkins with chemo etc etc. The plan was to hire a private nurse, bring her to Australia, and do a whole bucket list of things, ie..swim with dolphins, whale sharks, hold khola bears etc etc. During this time I had to go back to Perth for a court case I was giving evidence, it was a serious sexual assault case, so I needed to be there for a couple of days. So I kissed Heather goodbye, and told her I would see her in a couple of days. As a result I went back to Perth for the trial. I had only been back for 2 days, when I got the worse phone call ever. It seems Heather wanted to surprise me, so she left the hospital against medical advice with the private nurse to surprise me in Perth. They got as far as LA airport, where she went into respiratory arrest at the airport, and then soon after full arrest. They were not able to revive her. She was the best and sweetest person I have ever met, so Steve I know exactly how you feel. I must admit I don't think I have ever fully recovered. I have tried to find love from time to time, and even with the lovely pinay women that I met on my many trips to the Philippines.
    1 point
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