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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/03/2021 in all areas

  1. Depends very much on the individual HK. For myself, as said going from the rather run down city of Bacolod to up town IloIlo is like going to a new world. What i do enjoy here though is the proximity of Canlaon and the surrounding national parks, , Within an hours drive we can hike, often without the much vaunted tourist guide to water falls rivers, mostly no garbage. Due to the proximity to Mt Canlaon there are various cold spring resorts close by, fresh invigorating COLD water swimming. Close by we have such a spring run by a nature loving Filipino, beautifully landscaped and run for love not profits. I swim here 4 times a week, zero garbage, zero karaoke, its an absolute god send.
    5 points
  2. Zero???? Gazooks...are you sure you're still in the Philippines? Is there at least a rooster crowing somewhere in the background?
    3 points
  3. Forum members are not allowed to post messages that advise members to break or not follow the law. Philippine law requires you to carry a driver license. I posted the URL, but not the actual page because it is a PDF. You need to carry the license so the officer knows that the actual license has not been confiscated and you are using a photocopy. Republic Act 4136, CHAPTER III, ARTICLE 1, Sec 19 https://lto.gov.ph/images/ISSUANCES/Republic_Act/RA_4136.pdf
    2 points
  4. Optimistic to think that the covid wave in India will be over in 2 weeks.
    2 points
  5. I live in such a sub-division - petty theft and worse still happens. Thieves live amongst us.
    2 points
  6. Actually...family proximity was one of our high level geography factors...on top of the others regarding things like medical and airports, etc. There's an old saying: marry a Filipina, and you marry her family. However, "proximity" is a word that needs personal definition. For us it means being able to visit a couple times a month - so like an hour away is good - in fact, it's preferable. My wife has spent 30 years in the US and is fairly Americanized, but one of the reasons we're here is because it's an opportunity for her to spend some time with her mom and dad while they're still alive. So that factor steered us toward living somewhere on Luzon. Not realistic to fly to Angeles City three or four times a month from, say, Dumaguete. For others, proximity means "next door". In the grander strategy (get your basic factors in line), it can be one that gets added to the list. I think you're dead on when you point out keeping the wife happy counts. Seems like some guys marry Filipinas and then expect them to suddenly become Americans. Definitely does not work that way. Even after 30 years in the States, even with all that adaptation to American cultural viewpoints, my wife is still, 100% to her core, Filipina...with all that that means regarding cultural background and general outlook on life. Family is the central rock of their existence.
    2 points
  7. You think you are joking, but it's really possible. Kan Umantad Falls in Bohol is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in the Philippines, but it only flows on weekends. Most of the time the water goes to the very large number of rice terraces nearby.
    1 point
  8. LTO told me to do the same, carry the receipt of the driving licence as there were no plastic. But carrying a copy of your driving licence and using it to show the officials is illegal. Your driving licence is a legal document.
    1 point
  9. LOL, I'v seen these armed guards fast asleep sat in a chair. As much use as a chocolate tea-pot.
    1 point
  10. Got it, so you have to mail a passport and also a Self-addressed return envelope, with appropriate stamps for express or priority mail with tracking numbers via US Postal Service, or with pre-paid mailing envelope from private courier of choice (except FedEx), if Passport with Visa is to be mailed back.
    1 point
  11. http://www.philippinessanfrancisco.org/philippines-dc/embassy-dc/ For the US west coast Philippines embassy.
    1 point
  12. Not sure about that. You probably will be billed every month just the same for no service if you are in a contract. If you ever try to get a connection in your name again it wont happen until you pay. My opinion only.
    1 point
  13. Its usually not unless something of large value is taken. Petty larceny is common and usually a thing of the moment and opportunity in very many third world countries. I recall reading many blogs and seeing many vblogs from weathy expats in say, Costa Rica, who complain bitterly about how all their hired help have light fingers. People here seem at times not to affix rigid property rights akin to those in wealthier countries... for some reason. I can guess why since I read a lot of social psychology re the attitudes of other national societies, but since its a complex topic I don't want to start. My cheap tools have always had a way of 'disappearing' when I was out of the country for 6 months. Other than that, we have never had anything disappear..... Oh yeah, usually my old spring rattraps if I left them haning on the inside of our old bamboo perimeter fence or around the yard after unused for several months. I think male relatives took these things, but was not about to make an issue of it. My wife usually keeps things well put away and out of sight now so not to tempt them. When kith and kin come over for small repair chores I let them bring their own tools, and usually they are of the type and state that I would never use. Many here use 'communal' tools to do tasks, i.e., they borrow and don't always return, and sort of pass them around according to critical need, since money is always in short supply. Even craftsmen sometimes sell tools they will need and then borrow others if they are short of money due to food or medicine (or a million other things) needs of the moment. Even the carpentars here don't have even a fraction of what you'd find in the garage of the average American male. No sense in getting outraged or bent out of shape when small things disappear because its considered selfish, childish behaviour, unbecoming to stable, mature adults. Especially wealthy ones. I guess they figure that if it is so important to you that you will keep it locked up or at least well out of sight. Many expats will argue stridently over this since it doesn't conform with their moral or ethical codes and norms, but thats the way it is oftentimes. The importance of 'my stuff' , my individual rights, can be viewed at times and considering what specificly is involved, very differently than in our home countries. You pretty much have to confer with your Pinay to understand what is considered right or wrong here, and to what degree/level of importance, it carries, as well as local solutions when problems crop up.
    1 point
  14. I got stopped by a traffic enforcer in Dumaguete, I showed him my copy of my driving licence. He said this not allowed, show me your driving licence. Had to explain why I have the copy but he insisted I have the real licence. He gave me a ticket and had to pay p300. Since then the copy stays at home. Not a very good idea to say it's fine to use a copy licence on a forum.
    1 point
  15. I can't afford to move to a "Guard-gated subdivision" and for your information we are not a target. it happened a few years ago and we already know who stole from us. But thanks for your advise. Jim.
    1 point
  16. It sounds like progress to me too. Anyone who has ever tried to cancel a PLDT contract knows the frustration. In the past they would keep billing and nagging even after you stopped using the service. Now you only have to skip a payment and its over. Lovely!
    1 point
  17. A very good point to keep in mind if you have to revert to using them. They sell 3 or 4 variants at Handiman here, and quite a few years ago when we had a different type structure for the 2nd floor of our house which had an inner plywood shell inside hardwood framing with a bamboo and nipa roof mice were a natural occurence. Since we keep two dogs and often let the one who is an excellent and proven 'ratter' run free in the enclosed property at night, that was always a major concern of mind. If mice take up residence and start families, you will be plagued with continual noises of them scurrying overhead or within hollows, which will drive you nuts. With poison, you risk having them die inside these spaces and start rotting until the ants and cockroaches dispose of the corpses, but it takes much longer than dead geckos or small things for them to consume so there may be an unpleasant odor for a while. Nevertheless, I would sometimes use the blue or pink colored pebble poisons which I would introduce into the walls with paper funnels if there were any construction gaps close to the noise areas where they were living. It helped since there were no odors due to the outter design of bamboo and Nipa which was well ventilated... but not a perfect long term solution. We now have a new 2nd story structure with steel roof and no ceiling so I can see the trusses overhead. No enclosed hollows. When they do come around, I can quickly spot them and put out my live-cage traps at night. Its almost impossible to keep all rats and mice out all the time if you live near rice fields or empty lots with natural growth on them. After harvest or in times of long rains and flooding they are forced to higher ground, like houses. Rats can climb vertical walls and mice have no problem traveling along beams and rafters even though it looks impassable and impossible to do so. I've seen it happen more times than I like, and almost believe they have super powers that defy gravity. They are super gymnasts. They will burrow under your concrete perimeter walls, so keep an eye out for new holes appearing in the enclosed yard. That might be where you would dump a little poison if you can partially cover or block it to prevent your dogs from digging down to it. With a long paper or cardboard funnel, you can put the bait deep. I think the next rains would dissolve it, so you will be injecting god-knows-what in terms of chemicals into the soil, however. Might not be a great idea, since its just a short term solution.... but whatever you chose to do will be so, IMO. I backfill any burrow openings I find, Usually though, they are connected underground and have alternate exits, but it makes me feel better to know that they will have to work harder for entry that way, and maybe move on to easier pickings. If more of the neighbors engage in pest control, it will keep the numbers down, but I doubt many do. Most people just live with them, like they do with other pests here, only taking the trouble to protect their food supply and tolerating the occasional rat, mouse, larger lizards and the like. Snakes are another story though, and people will actively seek them out and kill them. I trapped out the last invasion two months ago, but whenever I spot one scurrying about on our property, I put out my cage traps and bait them with the garbage leg bones from my chicken dinner, since it is very easy to hang them in the bait crook inside the trapping cage. The bait is only good for the night, since the insects always will manage to get to it and devour it after several hours. Peanut butter works well on snap traps and you can mix in some borax that works well on killing some of the pesky ants and cockroaches that are around. Two months ago we had an influx of rats, and over 3 nights we trapped 8 of them, and the dog killed 3 more. I'm always happy when we catch the larger, smarter ones since they are the breeders and are usually pretty savy about traps. The younger, smaller ones aren't so clever. I had two consecutive mornings where there were 2 young rats in the same cage. Very easy to give them a bath, dropping the cage into a bucket or basin of water, and then casting them into the adjoining fields to return them to the perpetual cycle of nature. Pest control is a normal part of household maintenance chores for us. It takes a while to perfect your methods, but you do learn what works best for your situation. I used to use spring traps of various designs that I would order on-line from China and Korea (very cheap in cost and delivery, but now rely on the local public market for very inexpensive metal live traps when they rust out.
    1 point
  18. Thats the way I read it. We have just resorted to the way things were 30 years ago. Instead of doing it online and sending your card number for the fee. It seems to me that it would behoove us to go straight to the embassy. We are now reduced to the level of household pets. When we moved here, we just jumped on the plane, but had to go to the local consulate to get a visa for our cat
    1 point
  19. Haha thanks for the tips! Will make sure to take my kindle with me! My gf has a (very) large family so maybe one of them can be "encouraged" to do the queueing for me.... although I'm English I'm not a fan of queueing! ;)
    1 point
  20. Yes war and peace by Tolstoy comes to mind.
    1 point
  21. Like looking at the local scenery.
    1 point
  22. Having reading material helps with tolerating lines.
    1 point
  23. Or phillhealth at the least. @Michael H just be forewarned things don`t work here like they do in the west. For an example my friend had to queue up yesterday to pay an extra on his water bill didn`t take very long but it was only 6 pesos and he had already waited to pay the main bill. Everything here takes time and you have to be very patient. Apart from that, for me, the pros outweigh the cons. Welcome to the forum.
    1 point
  24. You bring up an excellent point! When, or if, you show up at the emergency ward you better have a credit card or a fist full of cash.
    1 point
  25. Get yourself over here mate. You'll love it...especially as a retiree (you even get the annual increments on a British State Pension). Bear in mind though, when involved with a Filipina here, her family will always come first, and they will always need money. You need to learn how to deal with that. Also, consider future health implications, as it all has to be paid for here.
    1 point
  26. I disagree... One can find many places that are "the same" or very similar, within any given country. I just made a comment based on what was posted, HK... USA has an incredible diversity of locations, climates, etc... I, personally, chose Philippines because of climate, people, culture. Definitely, the Phils... is not for everyone.
    1 point
  27. I'm fortunate in that I suffer cabin fever. I wake by 5am most mornings and can't lay in bed. If I'm too stiff to train in the morning I still walk a good 5km up the beach just to tick over then I train late in the afternoon. I'm certainly reaping the rewards as my knees are the best they've been in years. From thinking I'd need them replaced to now I hardly feel them when training. My partner has also had a massive improvement. When I met her she suffered from a stomach ulcer and asthma. Her diet was definitely to blame, dried fish, pork fat, plenty of salt and almost no vegetables. I refused to buy any of that and slowly introduced vegetables disguised with spices etc to her diet. She also accompanied me when I jogged the beach. It's about 4.5km long and she would set off with me. The first week or two she went from running about 200m to a km without stopping. By the second month she was about 300m behind me as I hit the 4.5km turn around point. Now she loves vegetables, has no ulcer or asthma and can beat me at times on my runs. I'm very proud of her.
    1 point
  28. Duterte's term ends in just one year. This is how he thanks the people who got him elected. Its how things are done in the Philippines.
    1 point
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