Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/06/2021 in all areas

  1. As most of you know, I haven't seen the AM (Angry Midget, wife) in person since February 2020 due to the beer bug. Yes it's been tough but we'd been using the internet, mainly FB messenger video chat, to maintain almost constant contact. Basically if we were both at home the stream would be on, we'd sit and chat or go about our business around our respective homes but it was always there. Well there was an exception: Every Friday night a bunch of my veteran mates and myself would get together on Zoom and have a few beers and a laugh and just hangout, we're scattered around the country and in a couple of cases, the world. We'd been doing it for years, even before Zoom became more well known due to the virus, and AM didn't like to see the antics etc so we'd "off the call". Around February this year, her connection began to degrade significantly; constant drops out, video and voice stutter and freezing up during peak until we ended up not being able to connect at all even with voice only calls. It was a Globe DSL connection. After constant complaints both by phone and in person, they refused to acknowledge there was a problem other than to say "you need more load", so she'd top it up, but no improvement. As our frustration grew she noticed a new store in downtown Guihulngan advertising fibre internet. She made enquiries and was told they're not quite out to her place yet but they'll get in touch when they are. I naturally thought that's be the last we hear from them unless she checks in with them herself but no, they called her when they were ready to install. So she went in and paid the 2KPHP for the connection fee and booked the installation. Guy shows up to install but tells her that she needs to purchase some steel piping to run the cable from the highway to the house. The piping needs to be buried and covered in concrete. Yes they'd previously done a site survey, no they didn't inform her of this requirement So off she goes, buys the stuff, her brother puts it all in and she gives Phil Products a call. "Ok ma'am, just wait two days for the concrete to cure and we'll be there". They actually showed up on time and did the install. 30 minutes later she calls my by video on FB messenger and viola! Perfect, crystal clear connection. A week later it's still perfect. I was dubious from the start though, after some research into to the company I found largely negative reviews but so far it's been great! It's an even better connection than I have to some people here in Australia on the NBN; testament to fibre to the home (FTTH) rather than fibre to the node I suspect; but don't get me started on that rant. She pays 1599PHP/month for unlimited @ 15Mps with about 100 TV channels bundled in. Didn't have to pay for the modem but they'll take it back if we ever disconnect. She's able to stream video and stay connected to me without any hiccups even on a 15Mps connection, again testament to FTTH. Other than not being informed of the trench digging etc, it's been a positive experience so far. I have no idea of their coverage outside of east coast Negros but I know they're rapidly expanding.
    7 points
  2. Yeah it's been tough but we're getting there. I'm 1/2 on my vaccinations and I was informed last week that the PI consulate here in Australia is going to start processing 13A's again in July/August. The reinstating of the contact online has been a great moral booster. It's just comforting to know we're there and can maintain contact when ever we like. Even the chickens, dogs and roosters in the background as well as the nieces and nephews making a heap of noise makes me smile. Biggest lesson for me is seeing people whinge about life in PI but not looking for alternatives or solutions to the problems; it raises my eyebrows. Granted, there's stuff that can't be solved, but hell, at least they're there, so they may want to think about that. Thankfully, there's few of those types on this forum.
    6 points
  3. This image was taken long before I first ever stepped onto the tiny island.There is a long odd backstory. Some believe it is inhabited by the enchanted, some believe it is cursed, while others haunted. It was a graveyard to the unwanted, diseased an unaccepted. An open barter's market long before Spanish coin and a Moro slaver's holding spot where those stolen where held waiting their Sultan's slave ships to carry them away to never return. Many a tear and blood, desperation and sorry most lost to time, but the seasons still come and go with a majestic timeless beaut and grace. I often wonder what long forgotten secretes do the ancient mangroves tell, seeping up from the ashes and dust where they dwell. Often we can almost hear a wisper or a sigh, enough to make one wonder if the Nephilim of the trees still cry? Thinking back six years the time has past fast, almost like yesterday when first looked out over these waters. The island is only 8-hectors in size, but narrow and long like a fat noodle. Dense deep-water mangrove forest on one side, and open water on the other with a vibrant ecology. with a 1-hector saltwater pond just behind our house and an amazing lady by my side. I think I can fill quite a few pages of interesting topics on this thread.
    4 points
  4. "Covid origin: Why the Wuhan lab-leak theory is being taken seriously." "What is the lab-leak theory?" "It's a suspicion that the coronavirus may have escaped, accidentally or otherwise, from a laboratory in the central Chinese city of Wuhan where the virus was first recorded. Its supporters point to the presence of a major biological research facility in the city. The Wuhan Institute of Virology (WIV) has been studying coronaviruses in bats for over a decade." https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-57268111?xtor=AL-72-[partner]-[yahoo.north.america]-[link]-[news]-[bizdev]-[isapi] But how do we get China to pay reparations to the rest of of world for creating Covid-19? How To Make China Pay For COVID-19 "China has been lending billions to African nations, creating the risk of debt traps for them; the United States could encourage them to renege on their debts. China has foreclosed on assets that indebted developing nations had offered as security for loans (such as the Sri Lankan port of Hambantota); the debtor nations could repossess them. China has allegedly sent aid to Venezuela and other Latin American countries; Washington could resolve civil wars and political disputes in the hemisphere while protecting them from Chinese efforts to collect. It could agree with European and Asian nations to resist Chinese efforts to pursue compensation when they renege on loans, expropriate ports and other infrastructure, and seize property. The list of potential responses does not stop there. Japan is paying for its companies to repatriate their business activities and assets from China. The United States and its other allies could start to do the same. Supply chains that currently run through China, say for pharmaceuticals or computer chips, could be re-routed to go through more dependable sources like Ireland or Israel, or other low-cost manufacturers such as Mexico or Vietnam. National justice ministries could become more vigorous in investigating and prosecuting crimes or other offenses committed by China, including intellectual property theft, bribery, and computer crime. The attractive element of these measures is that their execution rests in the hands of each sovereign government. China has placed its assets within our control; it would have to throw itself on the mercies of our courts for their return – a possibility that Congress could eliminate by legislation. The main criticism of these options rests in tit-for-tat escalation: China could respond by seizing American-owned property within its own borders. The United States would have the superior legal and moral claim, in that its expropriations serve to settle China’s debt to the world for its deliberate indifference to the coronavirus outbreak. China’s response would only amount to retaliation for the abrupt seizure of its property abroad. While China could respond with its own expropriations, they might end up harming China more than the United States. The Chinese Communist Party depends on rapid economic growth to keep its population satisfied enough to remain in power. Seizure of foreign investment could lead to an end to the free trade and open markets that have made China’s remarkable economic rise possible. It can seize the factories that assemble iPhones, but it cannot seize the intellectual capital that invents the technology and designs the devices – those remain with the United States and its allies. If China cannot innovate, which the United States could make all the harder by blocking Chinese students and researchers from Western universities, it will only be left holding factories designed to mass produce cheap goods. Expropriations could trigger a rapid economic decoupling that could leave China stuck in the mass production forms of the 20th-century economy, while the U.S. and its allies advance toward a more decentralized economy where decentralized enterprises, internet-based services, and 3-D printing can quickly transform intellectual creativity into goods and services. To be sure, U.S. expropriations could roil the postwar economic system that Washington has cultivated since the end of World War II, much to its own and the world’s benefit. Nations might come to doubt the rule of law in the United States and Washington’s strong defense of property rights, which have created the stability and predictability needed for the remarkable economic growth of the last 75 years. Cancelling Chinese-held U.S. debt could trigger severe disruption in the market for U.S. Treasuries, which could further undermine other financial markets. The United States would have to deploy political and financial leadership to assure other nations, and the markets, that it will limit these options solely to forcing China to pay for the greatest public health disaster in a century. It can then set about the work of constructing a new international order that takes account of the new great power rivalry that may now replace the peaceful U.S. hegemony of the last eight decades." https://www.hoover.org/research/how-make-china-pay-covid-19
    3 points
  5. 3 points
  6. I would not be willing to say what worked and what didn't as there are so many nations and states that did the same thing with different results. I believe luck, weather, population density and karma played huge parts in all of it. HOWEVER, those places that locked down successfully and took insane precautions did have better "luck" than other places. The question becomes: Did the means justify the results?
    2 points
  7. You'd need to name all these nations first before you can determine which plan worked and which didn't. Or with a nation like the US, each state had it's own plan, you'd have to name states. For example, the disaster we see in states like California and New York who followed the plan of Fauci and Gates and the WHO, compared to the success of Texas and Florida, who rejected their plan.
    2 points
  8. It doesn't help when the country of origin hid the outbreak and continues to lie and hide facts to this day.
    2 points
  9. @Explorer Just curious - Have you, your spouse, or your children had any of the following vaccines? Cervical cancer Cholera COVID-19 Diphtheria Hepatitis B Influenza Japanese encephalitis Measles Meningitis Mumps Pertussis Pneumonia Polio Rabies Rotavirus Rubella Tetanus Typhoid Varicella Yellow fever
    2 points
  10. 2 points
  11. Sounds good. This forum has been around for a dozen or more years so we can hope for longevity. Now we know the background behind your enthusiasm for your Dinagat Island lobster farm.
    2 points
  12. So now this odd tale forwards. It’s now a mere three months before another Karma intervention and cosmic Nelson “Ha Ha”. As unbeknownst to us, all our efforts to navigate through the road blocks, and finally reap the long-awaited simplicity of Dinagat Island agrarian contributors; unforeseen foreseen forces and events would place that bliss on hold (to date: 6 years and counting). That good friend, of my former landlord, by happenstance became a very close friend. We kindle much of the same interest. The wife and I were invited to a house christening and subsequent house-opening. While having lunch we were having a usual ‘catch-up’ conversation, and he queried about our settling-in on the farm, that were up to, etc ect? I mentioned some ideas I was drawing up for several possible rice patty conversion into fish ponds. He too has a worrying farm north of Surigao City, so such conversations are quite common between us. I knew he had interest in freshwater aquaculture as there is a river bordering his farm (but we have never had to walk-down and see it). His thriving law practice keeps the man chasing his own tail trying to keep up. I told him I was devoting much of my time designing a small lobster hatchery, that I hoped to I could later build on a tiny beach lot we owned near our farm. Boy that sparked a long line of queries. I never knew he has tried lobster farming before, I never knew he owned an island (actually two), or that he had inquired about the potential such a hatchery. That conversation, led to another and another and another, that culminate in a boat tour to his two island. The rest is what is referred to as fate or divine-intervention, as at first glance I knew this is where I was meant to be, and later our Dinagat Island farm would later play an important role. If this forum proves to shows longevity, then there will be plenty of time to occasionally thread in tubbiest of backstory and projections. But what the readers came to pay their wooden nickel, was the barker’s draw and the marquee promise. So enough with the bark and on with the show…
    2 points
  13. Yeah, well they have a long history of getting things right also. It they hadn't most likely most of the members of this board would not still be alive. I bet almost everyone of us in our general age group went to school with a kid who had polio and used braces on their legs. But very few compared to our parents age group, thanks to those manufactures. But to each their own, at age 63 I will take the risk of growing a third eye due to side effects or Kick the bucket at age 75 instead of 80 if it means my wife and I can enjoy our "golden" years in some sense of normalcy.
    2 points
  14. So what has life been like for both my wife and myself, living on a tiny 8-hector private island on the outer-edge of of a mangrove forest? In a nutshell, not boring and amazingly roomy. We are literally the last (only) electric-meter of the last power pole in the line. There is no water-well or freshwater source on the island. But we have adapted to any hardship (been a few) and have come to love living this (not so boring) lifestyle. So how did we come from life living between a 2-story rental in Surigao City proper and our little 6-hector coconut farm, to living tiny island life? Well is a 12 year tale of unforeseeable consequences, circumstances and little nudges by Karma and an angle or two. And if I had a chance to do it all over? Then I would probably still be here on this tiny island, just with better internet and underwater. So where to start? I guess a couple of months before I had ever heard of tiny Tangjanonan Island.
    1 point
  15. Information posted on BI Facebook 4 hours ago, https://www.facebook.com/officialbureauofimmigration/ As they are images best to view on FB.
    1 point
  16. Wont make the least bit of difference. Any action by an "international" body will just be ignored by china. Just like the maritime ruling in the South china Sea. The ccp hold the "economic" whip hand and they know it. Apply economic sanctions? The ccp will just tell the masses to tighten their belts,,,or go to a reeducation camp. There are certain advantages to a system of institutional dictatorship
    1 point
  17. Gates making billions? Source?
    1 point
  18. They did, but not just them: Make them all pay for their crimes.
    1 point
  19. That's great news Brett we can only imagine how you both miss each other. It's not going to be long now things will start opening up.
    1 point
  20. I agree that it is next to impossible to compare. However, looking back, we can make judgements on what parts of plans worked or did not work. Or are ridiculous, like face shields over 2 masks. I still think Sweden had a good plan, but they screwed up when they did not protect their elderly. Hindsight, of course.
    1 point
  21. It was speculated on 4 decades ago, that Wuhan China would one day release a deadly virus. It has been mentioned before but worth repeating
    1 point
  22. Are folk really debating the merits of having a disaster plan in place?Come on guys, the old adage Fail to Plan, Plan to Fail hasn't survived so long for no reason. I'm not saying all the plans were good ones, obviously they were not. It's all well and good throwing out examples to support/defeat an argument, but the only true test would be to have the same scenario played out in 2 different ways and see which has the better result. We can't do that so what's the point?
    1 point
  23. True. I was reading up on Sweden who never implemented any major restrictions and although they had their fair share of covid deaths most were in care homes and the death rates were lower than many EU countries. Their economy didn't suffer so much either or mental health issues. You'd need to add in the population size and culture, general health care and lack of cormodities though.
    1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. So where do you get your news and information that makes you all knowing and self-righteous? Expert "news" people like Chris Cuomo and Don Lemon? If you are going to throw insults, expect to get some back.
    1 point
  26. I think DEATHs per million would be better metric to judge success. However, I think the death numbers are a gray area. Excess deaths is the best number but not readily available. This also does not take into consideration economic success / failure nor the impact of draconian lockdowns on society. Suicides, etc.
    1 point
  27. I'll throw out there that it is possible that mismanagement is contributing to the high rate. I don't think, in most areas, someone can just stroll in on X date for their second dose. Their local gov has to notify them. Before that, the local gov has to secure the dose. In my case, I don't know where my second dose is coming from. The first dose came from the batch of AZ that was expiring in mid-June. Where my second comes from, who knows. In programs like the Moderna pay program the Red Cross is promoting here, you pay for two doses up front, so I ASSUME the doses are long dated and they set aside your second dose for you. In any case, managing a limited supply of refrigerated vaccines with expiration dates, first and second doses, etc., requires supply chain management skills that might be hard to find. I certainly would not put the IATF in charge.
    1 point
  28. What's next I wonder?
    1 point
  29. You would think Mike. But frankly I am not so sure. One of the main problems with Democracies is the election cycle. Once the current crisis has past, instead of funding and maintaining, lets say a pandemic response center, to get votes they will fund a bridge to nowhere or a refuge for snow owls in Hawaii
    1 point
  30. I just read the official notice “whereas” I didn’t have access to it before, and sure enough as mentioned by other members it is written “whereas” only for people jabbed in the Philippines., funny how they expect arriving tourists to have had the jab prior to arriving in the Philippines, if there is some logic there i really don’t mind if someone points it out to me. Whereas they are protecting the hotels by continuing the 7 day lockdown, at least it isn’t 14 days whereas it is here in Australia, whereas I know an Aussie who runs a government approved hotel in Manila, so I can throw my hard earned his way, that is of course if we are ever allowed out. Whereas all countries might develop, or resurrect the old yellow International vaccination book, but that would be a sensible thing to do. Whereas when I was serving on the grey funnel line their favourite word for official word was “promulgated” instead of whereas.
    1 point
  31. There goes the thought of jetting to the states get Jabbed and jet back..... OK< OK> OK lets be positive here at least its progress,,,maybe by 2023 they will get it together See I am trying real hard to look at the bright side,,,but my flashlight ran out of batteries
    1 point
  32. My friends who work in the pharmaceutical industry developing new medicines and vaccines assure me many perfectly good medicines are left on the way side just down to the possibility of law suits. Covid is an exception as it's a World wide issue that can affect anyone but if they say develop a new medicine for Bell's Palsy it can pass stage one and two trials with flying colours then the money men step in and decide if production costs and legal fees make it financially viable. A lot of medicines are for 3rd World illnesses and unless a charity or government offer to buy millions of dollars worth it will get left on the shelf. With covid governments have taken all the financial risks.
    1 point
  33. First though this odd tale requires a little back-story to fully appreciate and under the overall layering of unforeseeable consequences, circumstances and little nudges by Karma and an angle or two. My wife purchased the Dinagat Island farm back in 2002, using her company 401K. She was an assembly-line wiring-tech for Goodman a mayor AC/manufacturing company in the US. I was an over-qualified professional yard-niggar with the desire to retire early. So when 'Ike' rolled over the top of us, hammering everything our Nursery had already struggled salvaging from the twin-kick in the ball from 'Katrina' and 'Rita'; I remembered the old Irish adage, "When the ship's aground, the see has spoken". Well three hurricanes have a rather loud voice. So at age 50 the wife and I sold or gave away everything thing that couldn't fit in 34 'Balikbayan' boxes, packed or trash, grabbed the boy, and made the jump over the 'Big Pond'. And have never regretted that decision. The irony is that I am a skilled horticulturist/botanist with an established farm, which I rarely seen. Perhaps all that fist-shaking cussing I did at our Cleveland, Texas nursery before we left; perhaps followed us here, and rubbed a little on me here? My originals business model was a plan to raise crops and make premium grade VCO and gourmet vinegars. Instead I am on another smaller island raising lobster. Ahh the deliciousness of crow and irony, as yet unseen cosmic forces played out their roles. Though maddening at the time, now 13 years later I understand their positive effect. There is no accidents, merely designed order playing out before our eyes. A complex intricate webbings, of never-ending ‘Cause-and-Effects’ and tugging ‘Yen-and-Yang’, nudging us all ever closer towards our assigned paths. If one honestly evaluates and self-reflects on their discussions and reactions, than one can see the complex tapestry. A classic ‘Case in point’ example: I came to the Philippines to retire a live the quite life of a farmer, with a business-plan and business-modal in hand. But quickly found several roadblocks being directly in our way. The most pressing at the time was my dissatisfaction with the quality of the school my son would be attending on Dinagat Island. So my wive and I felt our boy would better served if enrolled in a Surigao City school. Both the wife and I both firmly believed our son’s education was paramount above all else. So we chose to leave the farm and moved to Surigao City. We stayed in a hotel while we found a decent affordable rental, and then set out to look at all the various schools. This was so once we decided on the school, we could then find a place to live near by. Once accomplished we settled into a new 2nd floor construction. At that time my VA rating only allowed us a monthly budget of $677, the rental was 8,00php, so after utilities our budget tight but certainly. The new landlords took a shine to us and are still really good friends. We learned through them that they were good friends with the Surigao City Mayor who owned a property next-door to the place we were renting. I never actually met the mayor and his wife back then, though later I was by him my former landlords spoke often about my wife and me. Another coincidence is not only has that neighbor became my closest friend, but also the owner of this island. The layers only thicken. Now just by happenstance (cosmic forces) our landlord’s wife was a school teacher, happened to be the Principle of Caraga Regional Science High, who by happenstance (cosmic forces) was good friends with the Caraga Region Schools Superintendent. Now by chance our was turning 14 at that time, which would make him both the eligible grade and age for accepted into C,R.S.H. program. By chance the 'entrance exam' for C,R.S.H. was still two weeks away, allowing him time to register for a seat at the 'entrance exam'. Those are the top students in all of Caraga who will be tested, and only the top 140 scores are accepted. Also students are only test at the entry level, meaning one shot, because only those accepted and then pass that school year, advance together to the next school year. So (from first day of enrollment, to their final year graduation. The whole group advances together (no new enrollments). I was so proud for my son when when I head he graduated 8th in his class, proving he had his mother's intelligence and not mine. So first roadblock resolved. I was actually consulting and designing a large floating lobster/grouper platform in Maldives at that time. The day my son graduated Science high. I was being unable at successfully securing connecting-flights, in time to get back to Surigao City (broke my heart). Four months after his graduation we had him on a plane to Austin, Texas to insure his safety; this was during all that craziness surrounding the Harry Doyle murder case. Six months later my wife and I finally officially moved back to our Dinagat Island farm. Once there again we could finally concentrate on tackling to second long-standing roadblock with zeal and vigor, finally moving home. Second roadblock? An inability to secure a power connection to our Dinagat Island farm. See at the time our farm was actually located right dab in the middle, of a dead-zone between two competing power competing power companies. Neither company was willing to run a wire to the farm, not without the long-nose tax of 300,000php. By then our total monthly income was only a meager 40,000. So I gave them a not too-polite 'PISS-OFF!!!' living over a year off-grid, walking over to a neighbor's to charge the cells, WIFI and the laptop. So in essence we merely camped on our farm for a year. So having years before moving to the city for the boy's education was the right move. In a twist of cosmic Karma-irony, In 2015 the Philippine government installed aluminum power-poles, power lines and breaker-boxes to connect three dwellings on our farm for 700php. So I saved 300k and get to grin every-time I pay that electric bill. Second roadblock tackled, plus a little free camping practice. Now the third roadblock was the strangest and most involving the farm. Back in mid-2010 the Dinagat Island Authority started a major island-length 2-lane roadway project that took six years to cut through our farm. There had always been a dangerous tight curve on that old road cutting through that part of the property, Plus there was a sizable strip of rough steep hillside on the other side if the road. They wanted to purchase part of that hillcementside to use for needed road-fill on major portions of their road expansion through the local township. Having been a commercial landscape contractor I had a general understanding that they would require much more that they were being allowed to spend. This is the township where her younger siblings where birthed add raised, and now nieces and nephews call home. So I talked about this to my, wife. We decided not to sell them the land, but to allow them full access to use the soils. And to also allow their access to the soils if needed, as well as donating the land usage for their bunk house, storage space for their heavy equipment; but must important to road construction is having enough space store rock, gravles, sand and sufficient space to mix them. They rarely ever move from these types of locations untill forced due to being inconvient transpurting mixed-cement. some may ask why did we just give all that soil away and not collect come coin? Simple. My wife and her family gain standing within her community, and for three years their crews then used their heavy bulldozers, excavators, dumptrucks and road-graders to pushed all that excess soil around our property for free. So in the end I gave a way hector sixe of hill of soil to my neighbors for free, which benifited the community. And in trade (we still on the land that is left) while receiving tons and tons of free hillside excavation/landfilling, sodt-ground packing and 1,000s of hours of free professional heavy-equipment usage. So in the end, did I come out on the losing end of those arrandgements? If so, I can live with it.
    1 point
  34. I find this thread amusing to me. Conspiracy theorists, expert talking heads, a Mexican director and greedy self centered politicians....most of their opinions are like a pitcher full of warm spit. Me, as a well rounded individual and a long term member of the Flat Earth Society, all their arguments are flat. Even their beer is flat.
    1 point
  35. Semantics. Covid-19 and the vaccines developed in response are a hot subject. Lots of highly opinionated people out there trying to outtalk each other or looking for gotcha moments. If you believe the vaccines offer some measure of protection, get it. Otherwise, accept the higher risk you may get really sick and even die. Wearing a mask, social distancing and washing hands is a community effort to prevent spread. You don't want to participate in the community effort, then stay at home or live far away in isolation. I am fully vaccinated (2 jabs + 2 weeks). After one year in voluntary quarantine, this means my wife and I can travel. Wearing a mask, etc. is my contribution to the community to prevent spread. Media appearances by all kinds of highly opinionated people is just blah, blah, blah. Now, I do give greater credence to Dr. Anthony Fauci because he is more knowledgeable about viruses and vaccines.
    1 point
  36. Thank you guys for making me puke. Here's my revenge: GOT GARLIC?
    1 point
  37. I don't refuse loans, financial support...whatever. (Not that I can recall ever having been ASKED, to be fair). I just make it known that I am POOR ...as they are.
    1 point
  38. I hear ya and second all of that. Was at San Miguel and Subic 89-92, and went back few times in past 10 yrs, even by the old house up in Kalayaan...Nothing is same Nor nearly as nice and well kept as was back then. They just discard the junk or construction debris on a vacant lot on the main base until someone ready to build on That space and so on. All the remaining orig buildings are poorly kept for most part. Other than having maybe a little more peace and quiet of lease living on the "base", doesn't seem worth it over all. Still loving my beers and wines here in WA (Bellingham), But we will be moving when the Covid thing eases, likely to Antipolo area...family is in Caloocan.
    1 point
  39. I still don't think my Mrs knows my first name.... and we've been a couple for 8 years now.
    1 point
  40. There is a pecking order here in my beloved Phills. Trust me, I know when I tried to get my GF's birth certificate corrected. Those who have money get things done. Those who don't..don't.
    1 point
  41. Well they have to teach all that singing and dancing and marching nonsense from a very early age you know. Screw the science, geography, English language, etc.
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to Singapore/GMT+08:00
×
×
  • Create New...