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    OnMyWay

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    Tommy T.

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/08/2020 in all areas

  1. 21 points
    It's with greatful thanks to all those people who prayed for my friend Louie who is now back home with his wife and young son. Louie spent over 50 days in hospital mostly on a ventilator before he was free from the Covid virus. To God be the Glory Amen
  2. 8 points
    Hi Joey The story-line; It was Louie's wife who works in the local hospital here in UK, who got the virus first. Louie who also works at the same hospital, then caught it from her, but in a much more severe form, thank God their son showed no symptoms! Some of the local Filipino community rallied round and provided the family with shopping and meals during their ordeal. Thanks for asking.
  3. 7 points
    I'm sure many of those Filipino gun smiths are highly talented craftsmen. As a machinist for nearly 50 years I would have a number of concerns if all the material used was "scrap metal". A few critical parts must be correct. I would not shoot or be nearby one of those hand guns when fired.
  4. 6 points
    Talking to a Canadian recently, I found myself repeating many times ( or explaining things) So I thought I would just put up this to help those that sometimes wonder what on earth we Brits are actually saying ( of course we like the Locals use slang a Lot as I guess many other nationalities do) SO Morning All
  5. 6 points
  6. 6 points
    The issue of new strains is (so the experts say) less of a problem with SARS Cov 19 - 2 than with seasonal influenza because it is by it's very nature a slow mutating virus where as flu is a fast mutating virus. That doesn't mean that it will never mutate but it's much less likely to do so, in a way that would effect the efficacy of the vaccine in any given year. The issue of whether young children should be given the vaccine or not is probably moot because supplies will (initially at least) be prioritized towards certain groups. There is ongoing discusssion about what that process will look like happening now. There is a general consensus that front line workers; Doctors, nurses, ambulance drivers etc should be first in line but there is some disagreement as to where then next batches should go. Some are saying younger people at higher risk (teachers, bus drivers, taxi drivers etc) and others are saying it should go to older people and those with co-morbidities. In practice I think it will be such a rush to get it out there and such a bidding war that those questions will probably be ignored. As for people putting it off because they don't think it's safe that's their call. But various employers and schools are already talking about making it a requirement to work or attend (unless you have a valid medical exemption). And yes the vaccine won't be an instant cure all, it's just part of the answer. A big part but just part. Treatments are important also, and we've finally got a couple that definitely work albeit on late stage disease. I'm sure during the next 6 to 12 months others will come into use. I will say this... if I'm to catch the Covid virus then I'd much rather do it in 12 months than now because medical staff will have more knowledge and better treatments by then.
  7. 6 points
    Impresseing to see what they can do with very simple tools! But I am not so sure that I would like to use one of these guns myself, when hearing that they were made out of scrap metal! For some parts in a gun it is very important that the right kind of metal is used or the gun can blow up in your hand, not a nice experience!!
  8. 5 points
    Not quite old enough for all of those but did these nostalgic things as a child: A paper route delivering papers on my bicycle. Stopping at a small gas station halfway through for a 10 cent coke and a 5 cent milky way bar. Saturday mornings at my Dad's machine shop in the winter hauling in wood and coal for the huge pot bellied stove. Saturday morning with the local boy scout troop picking up newspapers with a truck for recycle to raise money. Notice that I was involved in profiting from both sides of the deal. Going fishing in the local creeks and bringing back fish to feed to our pet raccoon Luigi. Listening to baseball games on the radio while playing wiffle ball. Building a huge fort using scrap wood in the back corner of a field, then sleeping out with my friends in the fort we built. No internet, only B&W TV on 3 channels and a party line phone in the house. Getting a real full sized wood bat during bat day at Wrigley Field. Wish I still had that bat.
  9. 4 points
    12 years in the Philippines and I used to skip having a salad when I could not find Kraft Thousand Island Dressing. I used to hate the local brands. They just did not taste the same. So here I am in Canada and I can buy it anywhere. But I ran out at supper time. "No problem" says Lyn. She whips up a mixture of mayonaise and Heinz ketchup and it tastes exactly the same as Kraft Thousand Island Dressing. Give it a try if you like. If you need the exact proportions I will have to ask Lyn to figure them out. Like many cooks, she just adds a little of this and a little of that until it seems right to her.
  10. 4 points
    This is an off shoot from OMW's topic about the neighborhood knife sharpener. As you guys may know, there a cottage industry in Danao, Cebu that makes the lucrative "Paltik". The workers there possess excellent craftsmanship producing any weapon of your choice. All from scrap metal.
  11. 4 points
    They don't tell anybody anything here - i don't get bills for land tax, income tax, Philhealth or HOA fees, we are expected to be proactive on these things. I joke to my wife that such bills are obviously voluntary - actually, I'm only half-joking!
  12. 4 points
    I'm a Jeepney rider - yes, they have plastic 'curtains' seperating spaces meaning they are about 50% of previous capacity. They are definitely more comfortable now as a result. Some have sanitiser and most have an old mat which may or may not have disinfectant! As for price - 11php compared to 8php so close to 50% premium. At peak times or on always busy routes they'll lose out compared to before but at the rest of the time they'll gain so maybe it evens itself out. With fuel prices presumeably being down that helps as well. As for trike drivers - rarely use but the price was the same when we did. Taxis unchanged (except driver seat is enclosed in a plastic curtain) but as always a few sob stories as they try to ask for more - I give them my own sob story so usually we agree on old rate. As an aside, the malls are strange places now, and kinda depressing. Eating alone even you're not isn't the best and makes no sense - if you're shopping with someone you're surely able to eat at the same table!
  13. 4 points
    Yep, contact your bank and tell them where you are just like one would if its a credit card.
  14. 4 points
    Here's a crazy idea....wear a helmet with face visor
  15. 4 points
    I really like Mitsubishi units and wanted one but they didn't have multi-split at that time. Units from Mitsubishi Electric [not Heavy] and Daikin are my first choices with Panasonic being very close 2nd. The newer ones have coated PCBs to prevent damage from insects, lizards etc. If they are installed correctly, grounded, proper torque on fittings, tubing flushed with nitrogen , vacuumed down to 500 micron and hold for 30 minutes they should last for many years.
  16. 4 points
    A septic Tank should be a sealed tank to work and for me and others I suspect, would never have it run into a river to add to pollution and I think would be illegal. it may happen here but is not on Tom
  17. 4 points
    I am guessing that many of you are getting as tired of reading about the endless home construction as I am about experiencing and writing about it??? Well... things are progressing... Ivan, the electrician, labeled all the breakers as he wired them in. Not the way I would label (really...masking tape???), but who am I to complain? Later, we can either replace this with stick-on labels or do it like in USA and put labels on the inside of the breaker box door? I am really super impressed by the wiring so far... Check out how neat and organized the circuit wires are in the box? That's as neat and clean or even better than I ever saw in my new-build house in USA back in the 80's. I mean, look at the perfect 90 degree turns and direct and straight wire runs... Ivan really is a pro at this and I am so pleased to have him as the Sparky here. One less thing to keep me awake at night - no or few worries about the wiring... One awning (called "canopy" here) as a sample construction for the rest. Looks good to us. Another canopy under construction. They chip out cement and hollow block over the windows to find rebar and then weld the angle steel supports to it. I am always learning about the local construction techniques here - so different from what I am accustomed to and familiar with in USA. They are now attaching the framing around doors and windows inside and out. It will look a lot better after painting... But they are paying a lot of attention to details... I really did not expect this. Or maybe they are doing this because they realize how close we are monitoring the work? The foreman holding a stairway handrail support for us to check for location and suitability. I have opted for more handrails than might be "normal" due to my inexorable advancing age and just because now is the time to do this rather than after the home is completed. The staircase is very open and we both want it to be safe and secure for us and any guests... Not pictured was the work of the boys as they dig through the ground installing the sewer line from the septic tank to the river. At one point, they had to dig at least 1.5 meters - or deeper - to place the line and under a huge rock that was smack in the middle of their path. I still don't quite understand that the norm here is to route black water after the septic tank directly into fresh water rivers and streams. It goes against my anti-pollution background and thinking.... But we are doing what is regulated and common...
  18. 3 points
    Yesterday I finally attacked three projects that have been niggling me for a while: taxes, FBAR (foreign investment report to IRS), and Washington driver's license renewal. Well... it took a few hours, just because I am not so fast online as I could be, but I muddled through successfully. Fist stop was FBAR and it is mostly an intuitive website. It has little helper notes along the way so you can ask what something is about and whether it pertains to you or not. It was the fastest and easiest and all I needed was my bank passbook in order to list the appropriate numbers. Second was IRS....ugh. I have used the free Turbotax service for the past two years and used it again this year. I am not a fan of Intuit - the parent company for this service - but this system worked very well. It supposedly could even access my accounts to download the data regarding transactions, but that didn't work for me. It actually caused some issue with the investment firm which made me have to fuss to get online again later to access my accounts. So I had to enter the data manually. The coolest feature was that they retained the information from last year's return so I was able to crib a few sections that I was not sure how to complete. It walked me through the entire process right to the end and I was able to then submit my return information online. Within 30 minutes it was accepted by the IRS - success! No tax due, no refund due, so very easy for a single guy. It always helps to have all the data from income and debts right at hand. Lastly, I noticed that my driver's license was set to expire soon. Washington State now has an "Express" licensing system that helps speed along the process. You have to register for it (for free) with a minimum of information. It then called up much of the data from my current license, including photo, etc... I had to simply verify that I was not yet blind, dead or impaired and also my state address. The renewal was fairly quick and easy and they picked the payment directly from my bank account - saving me 3% fee instead of using a credit card. I printed out a temporary license and will receive the card at my mail handler within a week or two. I just mentioned these things because I am so pleased to be able to accomplish these tasks remotely - and cheaply - online without snail mail or personal visits. Once the home is finished and we move in, I plan on setting up online payments (I am not sure if any can be "automatic" like in USA) so I don't have to stand in interminable lines - for water, power, internet, cable or satellite TV. On Wednesday, L wasted an entire afternoon waiting in line to pay the water bill (all of P200!) and actually paid for another month in advance... Good idea! Then she went to hassle with Globe about a double charge after waiting in a line for over an hour. Then she went to another line to pay. When she got to the head of the line they said, "Oh...sorry (deer in headlights and sad face), we cannot accept payment here. You have to go back to the line where you were before." WTF??? Then she was redirected to yet another line for payment. For some reason, they implied that they could not accept cash payments there. And they would not accept Gcash or credit card. L was fuming and approaching critical mass by the time she was done shunting between lines and "service" people who offered anything except service. Eventually she had to return to the very first line and finally made the payment. Yeah... if it sounds confusing to you to read this, that's okay, she was confused when trying to pay and was even more confusing trying to explain it to me. She is fed up with Globe.... I am fed up with "Stupid." She has heard about a company called Direct Tech? or something like that. It supposedly is a newer, smaller company offering only fiber connections. But they don't reach everywhere and are more expensive - but we don't know how expensive. We need quality internet service so she can teach online and attend online seminars...
  19. 3 points
    Pretty much home bound these days, and bored to tears with life in 2020 right now, I have found some escape in history and old film footage of eras past. Nothing like a bit of perspective to make you appreciate where you are in the here and now. Today I watched "Britain in 1900" and "The Early 1900s" while I was looking for docu's on the farming life that preoccupied most of our most recent ancestors. I like seeing how life was in the time of my parents, grandparents and great grandparents, as I'm sure most of you would, if for no other reason than to take time to count a few of our modern blessings and regret some of the things we've lost to modernity and the changing times. If you find any interesting Youtube vids re older lifestyles and times, let me know.
  20. 3 points
    I read the article and it sure does seem simple enough. My mind is telling me through my wallet to go for it. However, I just don't think my conscience would allow me to do that. Sometimes I wish I could override my conscience.
  21. 3 points
    I have never seen this. A guy has knife sharpening business on a trike. 20200710_115238.mp4
  22. 3 points
  23. 3 points
    If any normal people are close to Lucena City in Quezon province need some help when a system is being installed I'd be happy to help. No charge. Just as schedule permits.
  24. 3 points
    If you go to FaceBook, try Healthy Meats. They deliver to Toledo Cebu. Close but not quite Negros. I ordered 1st time a couple days ago. The Angus beef was nice and tender, best I have had in Phils! https://www.facebook.com/LodiSteakCebu/
  25. 3 points
    Born right after the War, in a Wisconsin industrial city, into a mixed neighborhood of German, Polish, Italian etc. ancestry, I loved taking the family shoes to the nearest shoe repair shop. The aromas of worked leather, glues and polishes stays etched in memory. Resoling was the main business then since good leather shoes cost quite a bit and it was worth resoling them. Men's and women's shoes were resewn, glued and nailed where needed. Metal lasts and a large lathe with a variety of wheels were some of the few tools needed. The era ended when cheaper imports started arriving and other materials became mainstays. An old man would push his knife sharpening pushcart down our dead end street a few times each summer. One of the large spoke side wheels had an 8" metal bell attached with a clapper that would fall and ring it as it was pushed. All the many housewives would bring their kitchen utility knives out to him when he came through. Maybe it was easier than getting their husbands to hone them with with a whetstone like we still do here in the PI..... at least my wife does since she cuts up fish and vegetables daily. People would also save worn out clothing in gunny sacks. It was a source of washrags, etc. Every month or two in summer, an old man would travel the alleys with his trucks, which had a scale to weigh and buy the excess rags. He would idle along, singing out.... "Ah-Raaag, Ah-Raaag " till someone flagged him down. He'd weigh it and pay you. Us children would make small money by taking our coaster wagons around to collect old newspapers which people would pile up near their garbage cans/bins and sell them for the pulp value. The last time I did this with my buddies was around 1960 when we filled up one of the kid's parents unused garage and by then you had to phone the scrap man to come with his truck. He didn't pay much for the huge load and we quit doing it after that one last time. We also made small money as children by collecting empty bottles and returning them to the grocery stores for their deposit value. 2 cents for the 12 0z. and 5 cents for the quart sized coca cola bottles. It saved the housewives from hauling them back when they did their weekly shopping on their husbands payday.... which was often cash pay packets. By the early 60's home heating coal was disappearing, but I remember hauling the coal furnace ash buckets every morn for my dad before school, when he cleaned and restoked the coal furnace for the day so my mother would have a warm house for her homemaking chores. He'd restoke it again when he came home from work. City Ash men would drive down the alleys and open the brick ash bins side door and shovel out the ashes every few weeks. Heating oil and then natural gas pipelines ended that era and cleaned up the air considerably. When the coal trucks came to restock the coal bins, it was as good as watching a circus, for a small child. The trucks had scissor lifts for the bed load, and the swarthy, sooty coal carriers would put down planks so span any outside stair flights, and then set up portable metal chutes to dump the coal down so it filled the cellar coal bin. The winter's coal arrival was always a spectacle for a small boy. The men had leather shoulder gear and packed the metal rod frames with either leather or canvas sacks up the planks and to the chute. It was a dirty, sooty job. A lot worse than packing the charcoal sacks from the trike to the dirty kitchen here in the PI. Good memories of another bygone age. Glad I lived through it. A time when a man's muscles earned him his livelihood and women weren't the least bit interested in doing what a man did for a living. Also vice-versa.
  26. 3 points
    I’ve seen a guy in Angeles doing the same, but he was on a pedal type trike. Had a nice little set up. No idea how much he earns, but have to admire his entrepreneurial spirit.
  27. 3 points
    HK, I think you are mostly right. Many people would confirm that I am, indeed, abnormal, HK... But that's okay, I can live with that... Many people are not familiar with A/C or a lot of other technical details involved with home construction and operation. However, after reading through installation guides for various things I have had "professionals" install, I found that much of it is truly readable. But it does take tenacity and a willingness to learn the processes. Also, the owner might try to not be afraid to ask "stupid questions?" I guess that another way to approach what is suggested by the OP above, might be to find someone related or a friend or even another third party conversant with the technology to observe the work? Just a thought... I am definitely not expert in most of these things, but I have curiosity to try to learn and definitely to observe, especially when a lot of investment is involved. In the current house build - and the previous one many years ago in USA - I spent a lot of time observing, asking questions and researching to understand what the various trades-people were doing and why. I find here that, even armed with a minimum of knowledge, the workers seem to be a bit more on their toes regarding their work. L is knowledgeable because she had her own place constructed years ago. She is never afraid to get right up to these guys and ask piercing questions (but she is polite about it!). I believe it pays dividends to at least know what and how things are constructed and installed at a simple level... Interestingly, A/C and refrigeration use exactly the same technology, the basics of which have not really changed for many years. A couple of hours perusing a manual, or - even better - researching using Kuya G - can yield an amazing amount of knowledge. Maybe I just have too much time on my hands to trust people to do proper work? Like I said already... not normal... When the yacht was moored in Australia, we had a problem with the refrigeration. There was a really qualified expert working at his shop next to the marina. He came over, checked the system and found a leak. He then purged the system with liquid Freon (bad old days) and then proceeded to evacuate it with his vacuum pump. He was super busy always, working mostly on fishing boats. I watched all he did and asked questions all the while. He took a few minutes to explain some basics, and told me the steps and what to look for. He then left the vacuum pump running and his gauge set connected up. After ensuring there were no more leaks, I then set to re-charge the system using his gear. To do so properly took more than half a day. Mostly it was just give a hit of gas and then observe while checking a few things from time to time. He was too busy to fiddle with that. So, I learned the basics and was able to apply them many years later when the occasional problem cropped up...
  28. 3 points
    You might be able to check which Specialists the best hospitals there have and choose one of them as a starting point.
  29. 3 points
    If he's actually going to weld without eye protection he's going to get 'welders flash' very sore eyes.
  30. 3 points
    The installation instruction come with the unit you buy. They belong to the owner not the installed. It's pretty easy to follow along. I watched an installation recently for a guy. The installer didn't follow the instructions for evacuating the unit. I asked him why and he said"We don't do it that way." As an authorized supplier of these units to you have some special permission from Carrier not to follow instructions or do you special instructions from Carrier?" After a consult with their office he said no it is just not they way we do it. So, we told him that would be OK as long as we don't have to make the final payment. They left, came back two weeks later with the proper tools to do the job and it was successfully installed. They were happy to have the new tools and knowledge.
  31. 2 points
    I can write in both the British and the 'simplified' colonial version, which we Yanks prefer to call 'American English.' I had an English gf in between my two marriages, and she taught me many English slang words and expressions. For what it's worth, she self-identified herself as English, and she didn't see herself as a Brit. The problem comes with my speaking, since during my visits to England, the locals thought that I was a Canadian.... I guess that they could have thought of a much worse place.
  32. 2 points
    I would guess that he paid by COD like most of us try to. We have ordered a lot on Shopee the past few months. Generally satisfied and some problem orders were taken care of. On July 12, we placed about 6 different orders (I like to pay for each seller separately) that had to be paid up front. I paid all 6 at 7/11. Most of those were from China. And we had another 4 COD. We received 7 of the orders rather quickly and gave them good reviews. 2 orders from China just were not shipping after 3 weeks, so we cancelled them. I gave Shoppee my bank info and the money was refunded within 3-4 days. One order was chosen by my 6 year old and was a Father's Day mug. Ordered on June 12, Fathers Day was June 21. The shipper shipped on the 16th from NCR, via Ninja Van. What a mess they were. It was in their system getting tossed around until the 29th. The driver hands me the package and I immediately hear a jingle. I shake a few time and the mug was obviously broken. I spent many years in the package business so I told the guy I would not accept it as it was broken. I did not open it. I signed a copy of the shopee order say "refused, broken". He took a picture of the paper and box and left. My wife chatted with the seller and she didn't want to refund our money. She said we should have opened the box and taken a picture of the broken mug. So I chatted her and said fine, risk your reputation on this. Then I filed a refund request with shopee. The seller disputed the request, but when I sent some choice words her way, she said she was filing a claim with Ninja Van. Eventually, we did get the refund, placed in our ShopeePay account. The mug cost p100 with free shipping. It's the principal of the thing, and daddy has no Father's Day mug!
  33. 2 points
    Perhaps someone is seeing the light? https://www.msn.com/en-ph/news/national/barriers-for-back-riding-couples-useless-more-dangerous/ar-BB16E4nF?li=BBr8Mkn ‘Barriers for back-riding couples useless, more dangerous’ MANILA, Philippines — While the Inter-Agency Task Force (IATF) on Emerging Infectious Diseases may be lauded for finally allowing back-riding for couples on motorcycles, an administration lawmaker finds an additional requirement “useless and more dangerous.” “I just hope that the task force will just forgo its shield requirement. I don’t see any reason why a divider or a shield for couples who eat, sleep and even take a bath together would be required to comply with such,” Ang Probinsiyano party-list Rep. Ronnie Ong maintained. “It just exposes them to more danger in the streets because of that shield.” Placing a divider between back-riding couples is not only useless and impractical but also poses great danger to the motorcycle riders as well as other motorists and pedestrians, according to the neophyte lawmaker. At the same time, Ong also revealed that this added requirement “is now the subject of complaints among riders as it has become a convenient tool for extortion by corrupt traffic enforcers.” “Nagkalat na ang mga post sa Facebook ng mga reklamo dahil sa ginagawang mga pangongotong ng mga traffic enforcers natin (Facebook posts on complaints regarding extortion by traffic enforcers have become widespread),” he said. Instead of a physical divider or a shield being installed on motorcycles, Ong suggested that riders just be required to wear full-face helmets, face masks, long-sleeve shirts or jackets, long pants, gloves and closed shoes. He also expressed hope that this policy will be extended to other family members as long as they have proof that they live together and comply with other health protocols, which would greatly reduce the number of commuters who are always stranded. The party-list representative argued that although it takes extra effort for checkpoint personnel to verify the relationship of all motorcycle riders riding pillion, the IATF should also consider the sacrifices and hardships that the public is going through because of inadequate public transport. Ong said many Filipinos are now relying on bicycles and motorcycles in their daily commute because of the limited number and reduced passenger capacity of public transportation due to health and social distancing protocols. “Allowing motorcycle riders to ferry their family members is actually safer than compelling them to take public transportation along with complete strangers who are all potential coronavirus carriers,” he said. He added that it is also easier to conduct contact-tracing if a rider or passenger is infected with the virus because of limited human interaction compared with people who take other forms of public transportation. He urged motorcycle riders, however, to be more responsible by fully complying with the requirement set by the IATF as he warned against habal-habal operators who would take advantage of this new policy.
  34. 2 points
    Hi, Belcris down town Dumaguete opposite shell station.
  35. 2 points
    Yeah... Reminds me of the old motto that people used to attribute to Bell Telephone in USA eons ago when it was a virtual monopoly: "We don't care, we don't have to!"
  36. 2 points
    For online payments here, Tom, it depends on the provider. Yes, autopay is possible but again it depends on the provider. For example, I can pay Globe, Cignal and BPI Insurance via BPI online banking but not my electric or water bill or Philhealth - they have to be paid at one of the payment centres. Globe! Well, to me the desire to be efficient isn't strong here - the lack of competition doesn't help not does the fact that labour is cheap. Add to that the apparent love of being in a queue and you can see why things move at a snails pace.
  37. 2 points
    UPDATE ...... This is the batch made from Jolly Juice - dry and very crisp if not as clear as previous - very moreish Martinelli batch bottled today
  38. 2 points
    As we all know, safety is not first priority in the Philippines It would be really easy to put the gun in a vice and then pull the trigger with a string from a distance, but they don´t care.
  39. 2 points
    That´s my consern, I don´t think they found the right metal. They are just using what they have and hope for the best. It may work for some time but there is no way to tell when it will fail. A typical 22 LR has a pressure of around 8000 psi, a 45 ACP 21000 psi and a 9mm 35000 psi, so there is a big difference between different cartridges. A guess these guns are not bought by a "targetshooter", more likely by a hitman who will use it only a few times and maybe they don´t care much about how long it will last?
  40. 2 points
    I think you missed something Dave. No assumption needed. He said the child has a CRBA (Consular Report of Birth Abroad) and U.S. Passport. The CRBA is obtained as part of the process of proving the father is a U.S. Citizen and the father of the child, which conveys his U.S. citizen to the child. The child usually gets the first U.S. Passport at the same time. If I recall correctly, you mentioned that your wife had a child who I would assume is Filipino. In that case, the child probably needs something from the CFO. Of course, it is possible the bureaucracy will require something for the U.S. citizen child and they need to ask. I agree with the other posters who said bring lots of extra paperwork for mother, child and father. Everything you can think of regarding proof of relationship. It probably won't be needed but will give some peace of mind to have it just in case. Hopefully the OP saved all of his paperwork required to get the CRBA. That is a good source of this type of paperwork.
  41. 2 points
    A few years ago when Capital One credit cards introduced the chip cards, they stopped travel alerts. I don't have to worry about that now. Previously, I had to go in every 3 months and set a new travel alert. I logged them in a spreadsheet, to keep track of how much time had passed. As I mentioned above, "If there is a transaction flagged, I get an e-mail with a green "good to go" button, and a red "no that wasn't me" button. You have to chose one and then it goes to their web site and says "Ok, you are good to go". I never had to use the red button yet. They don't shut you down unless you don't respond within X hours or you push the red button."
  42. 2 points
    Perhaps this is a bit too dear for some here... I pay about $52/year to maintain a Seattle area code phone number with Skype. It works for any numbers just like any other USA number, including "toll free" numbers. But then, I don't need to use them since I can call anywhere in USA for no extra charges using regular numbers. I also have it automatically call forward to my cell phone Skype and just keep it active 24/7. It includes unlimited time on USA calls also. It has worked out especially well when holding on "ignore" listening to lobotomy music or how much they appreciate my business - sometimes for close to an hour! It has given me huge piece of mind when resolving credit card issues/questions. The only real problem is that there is a time delay of a few seconds so sometimes we step on each other's words. But the call quality has been excellent with no robot sounds, call drops or interruptions, even during calls lasting more than an hour with friends. Like mentioned above, I have occasionally had issues when using the US ATM card if I exceed the withdrawal daily rate, make too many withdrawals in a short time (five or more within a week or less - I do that if I need more than P10,000 at a time) or go a long time without using it and not informing them that I am travelling here...
  43. 2 points
    And for the high tech solution
  44. 2 points
    I'm not sure but most likely a bank or card company will have more numbers or ways to contact. Actually these countries you can
  45. 2 points
    A doctor in the Philippines can prescribe valium. It can be a dangerous antidepressant in the wrong hands. A fellow I knew went a bit nuts using valium and booze together.
  46. 2 points
    I assume you are talking about using an ATM / debit card? Most banks are going to have some kind of security flagging so changing banks may not help. What does help is if the bank has a good system of notifying you of the questionable transaction and immediately resolving it. If they notified you and didn't require a response if the transaction was a good one, that is not the best system. I don't use ATM cards here, but I use my Capital One credit card here a lot, and I like the alert system they have developed over the years. If there is a transaction flagged, I get an e-mail with a green "good to go" button, and a red "no that wasn't me" button. You have to chose one and then it goes to their web site and says "Ok, you are good to go". I never had to use the red button yet. They don't shut you down unless you don't respond within X hours or you push the red button. In 2008 Capital One flagged a problem and shut my card down. When I called them, they acted like I was the perp and did not want to give me any information. It took me months to fix it and get a new card. I was really pissed and almost dropped them. I'm glad I didn't because they have been great ever since, and now have a good security system that protects me. Just yesterday, I found out that I have a lingering problem due to that incident in 2008. I will make another post about it. Some members might be able to give better advice if you name the bank.
  47. 2 points
    As much as i agree with the sentiments this is not small money for the country. According to the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation, POGOs have contributed P94.7 billion to the Philippine economy.
  48. 2 points
    No one can deny that this is a miracle. Prayers are such powerful tools of life. Thank you Kuya!
  49. 2 points
    I will also add a 'good riddance'.
  50. 2 points
    This used to be the norm in rural Australia as well, it's only about 10 years since the septic tank (sewerage variety) at my previous house in Maldon was retired due to the provision of sewerage pipes and a local processing plant. The early style septic tanks in Australia were not sealed, they had an outlet that was commonly piped and ran under the ground with small leak holes in them under the house lawn. The idea was that any overflow would be absorbed by the soil and become fertalizer. It certainly used to make the grass on the side lawn grow several times are fast as the other lawns. There was generally a second overflow pipe which ran to the street drain. However that was expected never to flow and you were required to have them emptied by a truck often enough that it didn't but in earlier decades it was common for the street drains to smell and be slimy because people were lax about emptying them. Storm water was (and still is) an open pipe running into the street side gutter. Nb I'm talking about a small town of 1300 people, larger towns had more modern systems. But what you're describing doesn't seem that different.
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