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  1. But its when you stop for a pee the danger gets you.
    6 points
  2. I say.... splendid idea.
    5 points
  3. No problem. The Philippines has a sufficient number of fake Louis Vuitton manufacturers to produce new wallets.
    5 points
  4. I used to carry whiskey made in Alberta. When I wanted a Scotsman to buy me a drink I offered it too him and claimed it to be better than Scotch. Ahhhh the pride of a Scotsman. I never had to buy a drink.
    4 points
  5. I told my wife if a ferry goes down she would make a perfect floatation device for me. She was only semi-amused.
    4 points
  6. Taking those long overnight ferries in the Philippines always had me a little nervous. I would picture everyone in the ships wheelhouse sleeping like the security guards in the Philippines at 3am LOL!
    4 points
  7. He'd need to wear a helmet on his a** to ensure that!
    4 points
  8. Cost of living comparison between Dumaguete (where I live) and Chiang Mai (where I used to spend most of my time). The data is only as good as the contributions but it's the best we're going to get: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/compare_cities.jsp?country1=Philippines&city1=Dumaguete&country2=Thailand&city2=Chiang+Mai
    4 points
  9. As Don said, no accountability. Introduction of KPI's and achievable quarterly targets with regards to customer service and satisfaction will go along way towards sorting the wheat from the chaff. Not wholesale sackings. Employees have to be given a chance to improve first.
    3 points
  10. For overseas travel, I use cards to reserve and pay hotels. Restaurants, taxis and other expenses, I use cash. The money, enough for one day plus an extra amount, is divided between wallet, pants pockets and a specially designed backpack. (Difficult to unzip, protected by a steel mesh to prevent razor blade slashing.) A security expert explained that robbers now avoid stealing from hotel rooms because there are cameras at all entrances and corridors. The room safe is relatively secure because you choose the password. The only exception is a special password allowing the hotel to open the safe in case you forget yours or leave the property with the safe still locked.
    3 points
  11. I think it's probably a stereotype but, like most stereotypes, it has a grain of truth in it. Probably comes from 2 things - the frugality of the Church of Scotland compared to the Catholic religion and the simple fact poverty was prevalent so people had no choice but be frugal. All that said, you wouldn't have to wait long to be offered a pint in a bar in Scotland so we're not all that bad!
    3 points
  12. As I've said before, its usually the first time out that the will question the Filipina. Almost a requirement but if people do their homework before heading to the airport there usually wont be any problems. Soon I will take my GF out for the second time but as with the first we will be ready with, Photos of us together Lease in both names to prove we are together Certificate of work for her proving she has a job to come back to. And anything else we think of to show she is comming back. Last time she was taken for interrogation, basically answer questions on a form then get asked the same questions. Shown immigration photos, return ticket, whatever. Then they allowed her through after warning her to come back, the officer actually said something like, l better see you here on (Date). The routine is to intimidate the Filipino to see if they can break them in case they have other plans. I understand the human trafficking issue, illegal overseas job issues and criminals recruiting issues but dont know if other countries stop or question their own citizens free right to come and go as they please.
    3 points
  13. As I soon approach my 69 years of life on this planet, and having one of my knees recently replaced (last week), the only bike that I will attempt to ride on soon is an e-bike. Maybe a very kind person (or a group of very kind people) can buy one for me as a gift for my 69th birthday? I might even be tempted to use the "free Strava app on my phone" if I only had an e-bike. LOL
    3 points
  14. The main issue would be to get her through immigration if its first time. We had a long wait some years ago and almost missed flight just going Vietnam for a vacation. Totally ignore comments or looks from others once in Aussie. Its a non event in my opinion, she must understand this also.
    3 points
  15. Better use British English - we don't tip as generously!
    3 points
  16. The OP said beer here was cheaper...I stopped reading after that as what else do we need to know?
    3 points
  17. That's what she said ;-)
    3 points
  18. I wanted to reply with both a laughing and crying emoticon....
    3 points
  19. In the Philippines that would mean you are now responsible for everyones dinner, education, and a monthly stipend
    3 points
  20. The 2 months following your first 59 days is the most expensive renewal. I forget the exact amount but it could be 8,000 pesos. After that they get cheaper. I have been told in the past they will not give a 6 month extension if you have been late renewing a previous visa but everyone has a different experience. Try bringing donuts. That's a nice gift and yet not a bribe.
    2 points
  21. I have never heard of a Filipino skipping a meal.
    2 points
  22. It is so hard to change when the "normal" Filipino is used to things being done a certain way. I would bet that supervisors and managers know exactly who is not working, but as long as the worker takes care of the boss, no issues. Lunch, snacks, a bottle once in a while, etc. I worked with a lot of Filipinos at LAX in the 80's, and witnessed it first hand. If interested, here is a good read on favoritism. It is not about the Philippines, but everything mentioned is widespread and accepted in PH. https://www.scu.edu/government-ethics/resources/what-is-government-ethics/favoritism-cronyism-and-nepotism/ What are favoritism, cronyism, and nepotism? As favoritism is the broadest of these related terms, we'll start with its definition. Basically favoritism is just what it sounds like; it's favoring a person not because he or she is doing the best job but rather because of some extraneous feature-membership in a favored group, personal likes and dislikes, etc. Favoritism can be demonstrated in hiring, honoring, or awarding contracts. A related idea is patronage, giving public service jobs to those who may have helped elect the person who has the power of appointment. Favoritism has always been a complaint in government service. In 2002, a survey from the federal government's Office of Personnel Management found that only 36.1 percent of federal workers thought promotions in their work units were based on merit. (Government Executive Magazine, "Playing Favorites," by Brian Friel, October 2004). They believed that connections, partisanship, and other factors played a role. Cronyism is a more specific form of favoritism, referring to partiality towards friends and associates. As the old saying goes, "It's not what you know but who you know," or, as blogger Danny Ferguson put it, "It's not what you don't know; it's who your college roommate knows." Cronyism occurs within a network of insiders-the "good ol' boys," who confer favors on one another. Nepotism is an even narrower form of favoritism. Coming from the Italian word for nephew, it covers favoritism to members of the family. Both nepotism and cronyism are often at work when political parties recruit candidates for public office. What do favoritism, cronyism, and nepotism have to do with ethics? One of the most basic themes in ethics is fairness, stated this way by Artistotle: "Equals should be treated equally and unequals unequally." Favoritism, cronyism, and nepotism all interfere with fairness because they give undue advantage to someone who does not necessarily merit this treatment. In the public sphere, favoritism, cronyism, and nepotism also undermine the common good. When someone is granted a position because of connections rather than because he or she has the best credentials and experience, the service that person renders to the public may be inferior. Also, because favoritism is often covert (few elected officials are foolish enough to show open partiality to friends, and family), this practice undercuts the transparency that should be part of governmental hiring and contracting processes. What ethical dilemmas do favoritism, cronyism, and nepotism present? Probably the biggest dilemma presented by favoritism is that, under various other names, few people see it as a problem. Connections, networking, family-almost everyone has drawn on these sources of support in job hunting in the private spherre. And everyone can point to instances where cronyism or nepotism is an accepted fact of life in political sphere, as well. John F. Kennedy, for example, appointed his brother Robert as attorney general. Every president and governor names close associates to key cabinet positions. Mayors put those they know and trust on citizens committees and commissions. Friends and family can usually be counted on for loyalty, and officeholders are in a good position to know their strengths. So what's the problem? The first issue is competence. For cabinet level positions, an executive will probably be drawn to experienced, qualified candidates, but historically, the lower down the ladder, the more likely for someone's brother-in-law to be slipped into a job for which he is not qualified. The American Civil Service Act was passed in 1883 in large part because so many patronage jobs, down to dogcatcher, were being filled by people whose only qualification for employment was their support for a particular party or candidate. Also, the appearance of favoritism weakens morale in government service, not to mention public faith in the integrity of government. Reasonable people will differ about the appointment of friends and family in high-level positions, but public officials should be aware that such choices can give the appearance of unfairness. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 19 state legislatures have found the practice of nepotism troubling enough to enact laws against it. Others may restrict the hiring of relatives or friends in more general conflict-of-interest rules. Public officials should also note that dilemmas involving favoritism extend beyond hiring and contracting practices to the more general problem of influence. Golfing partners, people who come over for Sunday dinner, members of the same congregation all are likely to exert a greater influence over an official than a stranger might. Council members, mayors, and legislators must make special efforts to ensure that they hear all sides of an issue rather than just relying on the views of the people they know. Further, many conscientious lawmakers have discovered that they must change their patterns of socializing when their work involves many decisions affecting friends and associates. At the least, they may choose to recuse themselves from votes where social relationships may exert undue influence.
    2 points
  23. They will make you renew. Just to clear that up, you pay the 1,000 PHP fine PLUS the same renewal fee you would have paid so an overstay after 30 days would pay that 1,000 PHP plus the usual P3,030 for a 29 day extension.
    2 points
  24. 500PHP/month plus a motion for reconsideration fee of 500PHP if you do renew. Potential blackbanning as well but I've never heard of it happening for cases under 6 months.
    2 points
  25. Slowly we are seeing improvements which is a good thing, a long way to go but hopefully the culture is changing.
    2 points
  26. It must really depend on the location. There is a McD's close to Crown Regency in Cebu that is always crowded at breakfast and none that I see (unless I look in a mirror) are over 25. I think they are either students or just working near there. I don't ask.
    2 points
  27. Also, additional options are using gcash, maya, grab etc. payment apps which a lot of businesses accept. It’s also much easier to send loads to girls you will be chasing. 😉
    2 points
  28. I bought mine in Hong Kong for $25!!!!! threw in a Nike t-shirt for $5!!!!
    2 points
  29. We had my stepdaughter's 18 birthday party at a private resort in Poroc. If you ever need a private resort in that area, you might want to take a look. It is big enough for a wedding but I would only do that in the cool time of the year. We met the owner for an ocular visit a few weeks ago. I think she is married to a foreigner. They built a massive big house on their large property. I didn't go inside but it looks really nice with great quality. Then they added a pool. Then they added a big building next to the pool with a function room / kitchen down and bedrooms up. That is called Casa Gundalina 1. Then more recently, they added Casa Gundalina 2. It just opened in April so everything is brand new. There are two buildings with 4 groups of rooms, really nice pool, a huge function room with kitchen, fridges, tables, etc. The nice thing about it is that if you rent just one section of the rooms, you get the function hall and pool to yourself. We rented one townhouse that sleeps 20 (15k), and a room that sleeps 18 (5k) for my daughter and her friends. You might wonder how they sleep so many, but they really planned it well. They have custom made high quality beds that a queen sized double decked, with a double/queen pullout underneath. The other townhouse is bigger and probably sleeps 25ish.
    2 points
  30. That's Yorkshire men. There's a rumour copper wire was invented by two Yorkshire men fighting over a penny.
    2 points
  31. I used to enjoy an occasional leasurely bicycle ride...until I started using the free Strava app on my phone... For anyone unfamiliar with this app, it is uses your phones gps to record the speed and distance of your ride... This is not an advertisement....its a warning.. it is makes cycling / running / walking addictive over the last 5 or 6 years I have fed this addiction, doing nearly 80,000km on my bicycle on the earthquake ravaged broken concrete roads of the Philippines dodging white van accidents (many) ...on one day my ride was 306km long...on a bad week, ehm, I have done nearly 1000km...typhoons didn't stop me.. Even covid didn't stop me as I happily smiled as I went through the detergent spray tents and the local road blocks... and just like Forest, two weeks ago I just stopped cycling... Be warned, Strava can turn you into an excercise addict
    2 points
  32. I have kind of wondered about that myself as we live in the province and wages here are low even by Philippine standards. I am always surprised that, given the local wages, the McDonalds here is almost always crowded. It is a mixed crowd of couples, families, extended families, birthdays, etc. I suspect that those who can afford McDonalds are better paid such teachers, police, government employees, etc. or as @Lieutenant Dan suggested maybe receiving funds from abroad. I also notice that the Philippine choice of meals is usually spaghetti or chicken (both with rice). This may be due to personal tastes preference but they also happen to be the less expensive items on the menu.
    2 points
  33. She might not want to leave! Visas applications are taking a bit longer than usual. My wife’s took 60 days were as in the past it was below 30. Pisses her off as mine takes under 24hrs and she has more money than me!
    2 points
  34. Where I live there's only one road, so I either go left or right...unfortunately, they're repairing the road and are much better at digging it up than filling it with concrete...this was the reason I stopped...It became a chore... Hope your hip comes good and you get out on the bicycle again... But be warned, stay away from Strava
    2 points
  35. Sad to here that, its easy to be involved in an accident in the Philippines on a bicycle or other vehicle... There are no clubs close to this small fishing village where I live. Mostly, local cyclist use mountain bikes which tend to be much slower than road bikes. I would enjoy socialising with other cyclist though...
    2 points
  36. Hahaha, yeah, the old punch cards ….. do not fold, bend, staple or mutilate. When I was 16 my first “real” job was sorting / delivering mail at the IBM corporate office in Princeton, NJ. They had a computer they fed those cards into …… it took up space in a room about half the size of a football field! The other half was filled by a machine that collated and sorted them.
    2 points
  37. Been a long time but i remember pulling a dictionary off the shelf to look up what " Spindle" meant. I was working for a hard ass gunnery sergeant and I learned fast not to F-up the paperwork.......
    2 points
  38. Brett.....long time since I have been there, mostly motorcycling and loved it. The most important issue is Comparison (up to date) of BEER.... We are considering a couple weeks there this year, just loved food like all, in spite of the MSG which I understand is not so harmful as thought.
    2 points
  39. Yes but video I watched is only a few days old. The guy said it cost the equivalent to $15 USD extra to fill his tank this time and food cost have gone up just like it has here. Even Jeepneys increased the fare yesterday but my point was someone said its cheaper but may not be at the moment and for a long time.
    2 points
  40. Rampart inflation seems to be occurring almost everywhere. I think some, maybe much, of the inflation was because governments around the world dumped trillions of dollars into the local economies during covid. Much of that money, at least in the USA, went to people not affected by covid so it was like getting a huge gift of money. Most people will spend an unexpected "gift" and that drives up inflation. The war in Ukraine, supply chain issues due to covid, have exacerbated the problem.
    2 points
  41. One of our forum members wants to know if those new 1000 notes will still stick to their forehead.
    2 points
  42. You will in most parts here like the mall otherwise you wont get in.
    2 points
  43. The examples you cite are controversial and thus worthy of debate to some - I don't think the safety of seatbelts is all that debatable to most.
    2 points
  44. Very strange, dozens of countries have been using polymer bank notes for years without having to worry about not folding them... I'm confused.. Oh wait, just remembered where I am!
    2 points
  45. Maybe the younger population are late risers so they skip breakfast. I recall McGeorge Corp., the McDonalds Philippines holding company owned by George Yang and his family, wanted the first outlet to be located either in Makati or Greenhills. The franchisor said, "No." They wanted the first location at the university belt because students are their target market. Everyone is welcomed and the advertising is directed to appeal to families in all age groups. But a significant portion of their revenues are derived from a specific demographic. An interesting footnote is the expected crowds for the grand opening required flying in from Hong Kong an experienced, well trained crew. After a two weeks period, they were replaced by Filipinos. Opening day was a mad house. There were chartered buses arriving from Clarke and Subic Bay. The passengers were buying burgers and fries not just for themselves, but also for family and friends left behind at the (then) US military bases. In addition to visiting McDonalds in the Philippines, we also try outlets in other locations. The franchise industry prides itself on uniformity, but there are slight variations. For example, France offers wine. It was discovered that the oil used for French fries contains pork lard. There were protests and threats of boycott in the Islamic countries. The franchisor promised a change in their oil formula.
    1 point
  46. Maybe with a Scottish variant?… since (rightly or wrongly) the Scots have a reputation of being the most kuripant (stingy) type of Brits.
    1 point
  47. I have an apartment within a resort on Boracay, they are strict on some things and not strict on others. I'm allowed guests as long as I message the manager and warn the security off, it's usually along the lines of I'd like two guests to visit, get clearance and 8 turn up. I can carry out repairs as long as I put a work order in probably so they know I'm not doing anything dodgy with the electrics and they let me park my motorcycle with the staff parking, if I as much as leave it at the bottom of my apartment for one minute security turn up and ask me to move it then they leave there's in the same spot. They accept parcels for me with no issues. All in I'm happy as the security don't allow people in and out unless known.
    1 point
  48. I dont see any problem. Yes some might look at you because of the age gap but who cares? Where are you intending on going while there?
    1 point
  49. My Asawa got one printed out with the QR code at her local Dept of Health office (where she was vaccinated) as she needed it to travel from Cebu to Manila back in March. You could try your local Dept of Health or perhaps where you got your vaccines at.
    1 point
  50. I didn't really want to get into disecting ThaiWolf's comments for fear of being accused of being defensive towards Iloilo (again) but we have all of those here in Iloilo as well. Cycle lanes thin on the ground admittedly but there are some. Brownouts are running at about 3 a month and all under an hour , never had a water outage in the last year or more. All of this is in my area. YMMV. As you say, it's all about location and not just within the country but within the province and even city. For the avoidance of doubt, I know this reads as a defence of Iloilo, and it is, but I think ThaiWolf has maybe been unlucky in his choice of location and perhaps hasn't experienced other parts of the province. The case for the defence rests M'Lud!
    1 point
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