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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Steve, you start out at the Bureau of Immigration (BI). The first 13a you get is a 1 year probationary. Then you get a 5 year. Once you get it you just have to go in once a year to file an annual report and pay a fee (about p300), and keep your ACR card current. The only big fee is the application, and that was only p11,000 (including the first ACR card). It is a very inexpensive option. I keep seeing people online ask “is it worth the hassle?” There is no hassle – so freaking easy! The immigration website has all the information and forms you need. Here is the link (current as of July 2016, no guarantees) http://www.immigration.gov.ph/visa-requirements/immigrant-visa/non-quota-visa/conversion-to-non-quota-immigrant-visa-by-marriage Even on their page they say the fees are subject to change without notice. So, I will give you the prices we paid – your fees may vary. The paperwork is pretty simple. The hardest part is getting the NBI clearance. NBI is not really hard, just a very crowded place. I was going to complain about the service – I had 2 people telling me 3 different things (one guy was inconsistent ha ha), but really the service was quite good. It was a confusing place. There were over 100 people sitting in line and I got walked to the front of each of the 4 windows. I really cannot complain. There is a basic NBI request form you have to fill out. You can do it there, or print it from their website and fill it out before. Does not really matter. Actually you can do most of it online, and I tried. The problem was when it came time to pay, there was no option for 13a or immigrant visa. So I had it all filled out online but could not pay. The fees range from p100 – p400 but I did not have an option to select. (my fee was like p125, once I got there) Hopefully they improve their website. The online option is quite new. But since you still would have to go there to get fingerprinted I just don’t think online will be much help anyway. When you tell them you are there for an immigration clearance there is another form and fingerprints. You also have to provide a 2×2 picture to attach to the fingerprint card (actual ink, you may want to bring some wet wipes). Then there are 4 windows/lines. You turn in the form at one, you get electronic fingerprints and an electronic photo at another, you pay at one, and pick up your clearance at one. You may get it the same day – you may be told to come back in a month, if there is a “hit” on your name they have to research further. The day I was there every single person I saw got a “hit”, including me. So I went back a month later and picked up my form. Overall a hectic, crowded, place but not too bad. Very similar to NSO – on a bad day. Here is a list of required documents, taken from their website: 1. Joint letter request addressed to the Commissioner from the applicant and the petitioning Filipino spouse; 2. Duly accomplished CGAF(BI Form CGAF-001-Rev 2); 3. Marriage Certificate or Marriage Contract; 4. Birth Certificate or certified true copy of BI-issued Identification Certificate as Filipino citizen of the Filipino spouse; 5. Photocopy of passport bio-page and latest admission with valid authorized stay; 6. Valid National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) Clearance, if application is filed six (6) months or more from the date of first arrival in the Philippines; 7. BI Clearance Certificate; and 8. Original or certified true copy of Bureau of Quarantine Medical Clearance, if applicant is a national of any of the countries listed under Annex “A” of Immigration Operations Order No. SBM-14-059-A who arrived in the Philippines on or after June 2014 1. The joint letter I will get back to in a minute. 2. The form is online and is a standard 2 or 3 page immigration form. If you ever filled out a tourist visa extension, you can handle it. 3. When we got married we got numerous NSO copies of our marriage license, so that was easy (extra copies in the safe). 4. NSO birth certificate for her should be easy, since you should have needed it to get married. 5. Standard copies of passport that immigration always wants. The bio page, your last entry, and your current extension, BB stamp, whatever is authorizing your stay. 6. NBI clearance, we already talked about. If you have been in the PIs less than 6 months you need police clearance from your home country. I have no idea where we would get that, but I have been here 3 years so not a problem. They seem to be confused when you tell them that in the US we don’t get police clearances for jobs and stuff. Others might do a background check on you – but we are not required to get police or barangay clearances. Just different ways of doing things. 7. BI clearance. Standard letter they put with your extension receipt. They will get you a new one, I brought my current one and they did not want it. 8. Confusing but I looked up Annex A and it does not apply to the US. So not an issue. Ok back to the letter. One of the more discussed things online and numerous different versions of sample letters floating around. I include the one I used. On the immigration website it says all forms have to be certified (like NSO copies) and all sworn statements or affidavits must be notarized. So every sample of the request letter I have seen was notarized. Every expat page I have read says it has to be notarized. When I asked at our local office they said it does not have to be notarized, but since it is called a “joint” letter of request it has to be signed by both of us. That is much easier. I would rather sign it myself than tack down a notary. In the US everyone, and their dog, is a notary. Here the only notaries I have found are attorneys. That was one hassle I would happily skip. So, for us, no notary. Your office may be different. I made a letter based on online samples. When we took in our paperwork it was refused. The clerk made some changes on it and told us to rewrite it. One glaring mistake was that they changed Directors in Manila (although their website has not been updated). They gave back the copy of her passport, they did not want it. I included it because it was on so many of the sample letters I saw. Here is the letter we turned in, after his corrections: Sir (current commissioner name), Commissioner Bureau of Immigration Manila May I respectfully request a non-quota immigrant visa under Section 13, paragraph A of the Philippine Immigration Act as amended, in favor of my foreign spouse, (foreigner’s name) , a (foreigner’s country) national. I am (Filipina’s name), a Philippine citizen. We were married in (location) on (date). I am enclosing copies of the following documents to prove my above-cited information: My NSO-issued Birth Certificate Photocopy of my passport Our NSO-issued Marriage Contract His National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) Clearance Photocopy of the pertinent pages of his passport: A. bio-page B. page/s showing: 1. His immigration admission and it’s extensions. 2. BI Clearance Certificate Very truly yours, __(Filipina Spouse Name) _ __(Foreigner Spouse Name) Petitioner/Filipino Spouse Husband/Applicant __(address) __ __(address) __ Address Address What we also had to do was get another copy of my passport pages and 2 more 2×2 pictures, for my ACR card application (I always have 5 or 6 2x2s in my passport wallet). Put all the forms in 2 folders. One for the 13a, one for the ACR. This I did not see anything about online. We had to go to a net cafe to print the new letter so we just dropped by the school supply section of the grocery store for 2 manila folders. We went to immigration in the morning and they made the changes on our letter. We went to a net cafe to get it done, went to lunch, and back to immigration that same afternoon. Turned in the paperwork, paid our fees, and were told to come back in 2 weeks for a hearing. The fees were p11,000 total. That was the published application fee of p8,620 and the ACR fee. The ACR fee is listed as 50 US dollars. So I suppose it fluctuates with the exchange rate. It was total eleven thousand and some change. I have read online about much more expensive fees, but I guess our Iloilo office is honest. I have always been pleased with the service at our Iloilo immigration office. very fast and friendly service. I don’t think they have ever overcharged me for anything. We went to the hearing yesterday. Even simpler than the paperwork. We went to immigration and they took us upstairs to the bosses office (I don’t know the job title of the local boss, sorry). He looked over the paperwork, asked us a few questions, and signed off on it. I have been here 3 years, have some monthly money, we built a house, we have been married 2 years, no problem. Back downstairs for fingerprints, for the ACR card. We were done in time for brunch. The only concern now is how long will it take for the visa to come in? They said they will contact us when it is ready. I assume 2 or 3 months – and they would not say. That is not really a problem, though. It comes in when it comes in. Everyone was very polite and very friendly, as they are always are in the Iloilo office. Have I mentioned how pleased I am with our office? Overall a very simple and painless process. We are lucky and our local office will process the 13a (even though the immigration website says they do not). It did take us 3 trips to immigration so if you have to travel for it… yeah, it will be a bummer.
  2. 2 points
    I have an HSBC account in the UK and also the Philippines. I thoroughly recommend it. I registered for an Advance account. This gives you two accounts side by side. A pound Sterling savings account and a Peso account. You can Global link all accounts. I get my Armed Forces pension paid into my UK account and I can transfer it instantly free of charge to my Philippines Sterling account. I watch the exchange rate and when it's beneficial change it to Peso. I lose maybe 1/2 Peso on the day exchange rate. I get two debit cards that allow me to draw up to 50k peso daily free of charge at most ATMs.
  3. 2 points
    You are right, I am sure. And then, when they get behind the wheel, they do what Filipinos are very good at - mimicking others that they see... So they see the bozos cutting lanes and all the rest already presented here and just copy cat that so that they are accepted as drivers and not chastised by their friends, relatives or other drivers... so it continues, ad nauseum...
  4. 2 points
    Most don't get any lessons lol. Most people have a relative who has a friend in the office who can sort it for them, if not just pay 3-4k pesos and done.
  5. 1 point
    They were all warned But.............. ****** DUMAGUETE CITY, Negros Oriental, Aug 20 (PIA)–Dumaguete City’s Traffic Management Office (TMO) in cooperation with other law enforcement agencies nabbed 16, 334 traffic violators in response to Mayor Felipe Antonio Remollo’s directive to restore order in the city's streets. The City government slapped traffic violators with corresponding penalties from July 2017 up to June 30, 2018. TMO Head Gilbert Ablong Sr. in his report to Mayor Remollo said that they impounded 2, 941 motor vehicles in the same period. Some of these impounded vehicles (mostly motorcycles) were apprehended including the drivers through the inter-agency Oplan Displina implemented in cooperation with the Provincial Highway Patrol Group, Land Transportation Office and the City Philippine National Police. Among the violations are driving without licenses, no registration, modified mufflers, illegal parking, refusal to convey passengers, etc. TMO has also established engineering pavement marking including pedestrian lanes in 30 intersections and school zones, delineation of sidewalks and setback and 181 parking boxes. Some 3, 000 drivers of motorcabs for hire underwent seminars for responsible driving of public transport by the TMO. Mayor Remollo has already indicated his objective to install traffic light system in major intersections and streets so that the TMO personnel can focus in enforcement rather than manning the streets to direct traffic. Once the CCTVs shall have been installed, Mayor Remollo said that the no contact policy in apprehending violators will be implemented to ensure accurate recording of any violation or incident and to eradicate any suspicion of wrongdoing and extortion on the part of the enforcers or motorists. (jct/PIA7-Negros Oriental with reports from CPIO Dems Demecillo) Traffic enforcement Dumaguete https://pia.gov.ph/news/articles/1012036
  6. 1 point
    Who knows Bruce but this New Mayor has Balls and we are all hoping things will continue to get better, I tend to think the CCTV venture will pay Dividends if the Operators can stay awake long enough I can't find the List but August 7 yielded some 680+ helmet and or Flip Flop offences, the odd one was 5 Foreigners in the City with no Shirts + 1 Urinating We shall see
  7. 1 point
    As a Follow up to the previous Post ***** 89 more apprehended in the discipline zone in day and night operations Enforcers of the discipline zone arrested more violators of various infractions to include illegal parking and for smoking in public places. Six more motorcycles have also been impounded. Members of the Technical Working Group composed of the City DILG Officer Farah Diba Gentuya, City Councilor Michael Bandal, Assistant City Administrator Dinno Depositario, Engr. Wilfredo Oira of the City Engineer’s Office and City PNP Chief-of-Police Supt. Jonathan Pineda report to Mayor Felipe Antonio Remollo the gains and challenges in the implementation of the discipline zone. Mayor Remollo lauded the team for its firm and unprecedented efforts in restoring law and order in the streets as he reiterates his full support to the project. http://dumaguetecity.gov.ph/2018/03/04/89-more-apprehended-in-the-discipline-zone-in-day-and-night-operations/
  8. 1 point
    Not really Viable for us on Negros but thank you for the reply
  9. 1 point
    There are branches in Manila, 4 I think, plus one in Cebu and one in Davao. 6 in total, or so I read when I looked into it a few years ago.
  10. 1 point
    Thanks... Yeah... L tells me to chillax constantly... so I am working on it. But, Thank God that there is still Tanduay at the end of any journey - even just picking her up from work and taking her home!!! And she offers other ways to relax that really help too... She loves to drive... ahem......
  11. 1 point
    Only for "Obstruction!" That is their favourite...
  12. 1 point
    AK... Yes... I am so ashamed... I forgot...
  13. 1 point
    Next time just wait for one of the PNP cars that are constantly patrolling the streets looking for traffic violators!
  14. 1 point
    You should be ashamed of yourself. Haven't you learned that sidewalks in the Phills are for vendors only?
  15. 1 point
    Actually, I did!!!! And they don't call them "emergency flashers" here... They are called "hazard lights" and I certainly understand why... Most Filipino drivers should drive with them on all the time!!! (and some of them actually do!!!!)
  16. 1 point
    you must not have had your emergency flashers on...…………..
  17. 1 point
    True and motorbikes too, forcing pedestrians to walk on the road.
  18. 1 point
    With something stuck to them? I like your idea! Believe me... I really hope that would work. As it is, I have really little to no trust in the legal system here. Partially from what I read and hear and bit from my own experience so far... Might (and money) makes right, it appears? Meanwhile, you and I and the rest of us all have to be vigilant for the next doctor, lawyer, merchant or chief who decides to play tag with his car so he(or she) can get that ahead of us by that bare millisecond that seems so important... Sorry, Robert, but this whole subject strikes a nerve with me. I am much cooler about driving, but I still need a hit of Tanduay or a beer when I am done driving somewhere!
  19. 1 point
    I've always hear turn about is fair play. I might have to see the police supervisor in his office with the door closed. To submit my statement forms.
  20. 1 point
    Robert... I have seen that sort of action countless times. Lately, CTTMO seems to do emphasis busts of drivers doing exactly that sort of thing at a few intersections here - going straight and cutting into traffic again from turn lanes, turning left or right from across the road in exactly the wrong lane - that cheers my heart. But, sadly, that behaviour is not limited to Philippines, just more common and blatant here. Constant patrols and enforcement would settle things down a lot, I believe, if they were enacted. I think also that even the sporadic enforcement is working a bit... By the way, I think you are lucky he wasn't a senator or barangay captain... Have you noticed that all taxis (at least here in Davao) now have CCTV cameras and monitors with memory? Many regular drivers are getting them too. I can only think it is to provide evidence for when there is a crash? Maybe those will slow down the taxi drivers, at least? (yes...I know... I said MAYBE). Please forgive the aside: On hwy 520 in Seattle, there is a bottleneck at a bridge. People tried to sneak in using the right HOV lane and make like they just were entering traffic from the entrance ramp that happened to be right there. State Patrol routinely busted people for that and, I don't remember the fine, but is was enough that you didn't want to get caught. Back on topic... I am not criticizing you, but I would advise you, Robert, to consider being a bit more cautious and just let the cheaters go, at least a little bit, even though it goes against your grain. A horn honk would not seem out of order, just not a long irritated blast. I see many incidents of road rage here and in USA. People are getting killed or seriously hurt from road rage. Tempers seem to run hot with many drivers here... So what's their hurry? Why does a five second faster trip make a difference? Two days ago I was driving in the middle of three lanes when a jeepney started to pull out from the right lane right in front of me. I veered left and blasted the horn to warn him that I was there... He would have hit me if I had not evaded. So I kept along my way, right at the 40 kph speed limit and he came roaring up past me in the left lane then - very close to me - passed me, then did a couple of hard cuts to the right in front of me... So he won! He got in front of me and showed me he was The Man and could and would do what he wants.Fortunately he turned soon the opposite way from my direction. I had a guy in the left turning lane next to me at a stop light. When the light changed, I gunned it, just because I was in a bad mood and I sensed that he was one of those cheaters. The guy in the left gunned it too, but probably did not expect me to not be another slow sheep? Boy, was he pissed when he had to cut in behind me. In retrospect, it was a really stupid thing for me to do and I won't repeat. I thought about road rage then and always will.
  21. 1 point
    Now that I have read the article, I'm pretty sure he nailed it with the Taxi Er, I mean ambulance that I always see lights and sirens at lunch time, same one.
  22. 1 point
    The rule of many is devil take the hindmost. I think those are also the people who cut in line, anywhere. I'm disgusted with all the ones who drive on the shoulder knowing that the first tree or parked car they will have to stop the normal traffic lane to let them back in. The normal traffic lane could move at a decent pace if not for having to let in all the drivers from the shoulder who think they are getting one over on everyone else. They just don't care. I have given up caring about them. If nobody let them back in, they would learn to maintain the traffic lane. I suspect they cause a fair number of accidents. In my book, that makes them bad people. Not all are bad, but there are more than a few that are totally discourteous and I can't believe that it only applies when they are driving. As an example, there was a driver who was behind me in the left hand turn lane coming to a "T" intersection. He got over in the right hand turn lane and started turning left, went through parking spaces off the road then started forcing his way back in. I maintained my lane but but he didn't care, there was a bus ahead and a string of cars behind.. Judicious use of my brakes let him get away with only a scratch but he blamed me for the accident and wanted me to pay for his paint even though he had just bragged that he was a doctor, bragged that his 3 year old car was"New" and he refused to show me his insurance. I asked him for his insurance several times, he had none. His reasoning was that he had the right of way because the nose of his car was ahead of mine, even though he wasn't in the traffic lane. I finally decided that I could either leave or call the police and I decided to just leave, replace my turn signal lens and get on with life. It was a new experience though, that was the first collision with a Filipinos vehicle where they stopped, there have been 7 so that would be 6 hit and runs, if you counted the one that kept going to his destination 40 meters away (his front brake wasn't working and his slipper got caught on the foot peg so he couldn't use the rear brake and he had a passenger who was holding a computer tower and they were going way too fast)( so he used the side of my freshly painted vehicle to scrub off some velocity?). I will let you be the judge if hit and runs make you a bad person. Most are not like that but there certainly is no shortage of them.
  23. 1 point
    "Better to live on a corner of the roof than share a house with a quarrelsome wife." Seems like men discovered the secret of how to live with the "short angry one" thousands of year ago?
  24. 1 point
    Hk... I guess nobody can be totally sure about that - agreed. Saving face is a very big thing in Asian cultures, I understand, so I see your point. Perhaps I should better have said that it appears they respected her for her stand...? As it is, she has worked with many of those same individuals since, advanced in her career and does have a bit of a reputation for being somewhat outspoken. The incident occurred several years ago. There may be some lingering resentments(?) but, if so, they have not affected her adversely so far as she is aware. . I still like her attitude and displays of free will.
  25. 1 point
    I just found this online in MSN.com. It very much applies to L whenever we travel together. It is about documenting a vacation or event using social media... L uses Messenger and FaceBook and is actually not so bad at posting everything like her friends do... But she likes to take multiple photos of food, herself and us - sometimes it drives me crazy. People go on vacation to get away from stress, discover the world, seek adventure, and . . . live their best Instagram life? Yes, for a lot of people, that last part is true (and top priority). I recently went on vacation with a friend of mine who, instead of experiencing things with me and being in the moment, looked at our trip together as one big photo shoot. Now, while I'm all about taking pictures, capturing memories, and even sharing them on social media (hey, it's fun!), I'm not OK with taking 30-plus photos to get the "perfect" shot or letting photo ops dictate an itinerary. Which is pretty much exactly what happened. About two weeks before the trip, we couldn't even talk about what was supposed to be an epic adventure between friends without bringing up Instagram. She made a list of all the places she wanted to get photos and even picked out and coordinated outfits for these shots that she envisioned to share with her followers. We were influencers but without any influence. And I get it. Instagram has made pretty much everyone into a model these days. And why shouldn't you share cool photos that make you feel good? But a lot of the time - like on our vacation - it's not about capturing a genuine smile in a spontaneous moment anymore. It's about faking it, staging it, and trying to look like you're having the time of your life even when you aren't. I was happy to take pictures, but it soon reached a point where I wasn't enjoying myself. I love my friend, but I hated what she had made of the trip. I wanted to remember the views with my own eyes, not looking at it through a screen and clicking a button over and over again. I wanted to really soak up every aspect of our trip and validate it through those moments instead of only feeling good about what we were doing and where we were through "likes." On the last day of our vacation, we headed out on an all-day boat adventure. I gently suggested that we both leave our phones (aka cameras) in the room. She looked at me like someone had died. I started laughing because I didn't think my request was so terrible. I mean, we were in this beautiful place, and it deserved every ounce of attention we had to give it. With major hesitation, she gave way, and we didn't take any photos that day. It was the best day of the trip. We got to really explore and make memories for ourselves instead of worrying about capturing content to share with other people. The day was ours, and it was awesome. In lieu of picture taking, we spent the day listening to music on and off, which, in a way, is very similar. Whenever I hear those songs now, I'm immediately taken back to those moments and vivid memories from our trip flash through my mind. And while I don't think my friend will abandon her photo-shoot-planning ways anytime soon, I think she maybe learned that it doesn't have to be constant. That some things are meant to be experienced without a camera. And that some friends are worth compromising for.
  26. 1 point
    This is a hole in the ground. Beats me why we have a title and topic so lets all talk anything anywhere. Anyone else seen a hole like this?
  27. 1 point
    Neng says if it your idea for a get together and you invite people you will be the one to pay. Pinoy or expat. If you don"t want to pay don't initiate the event.
  28. 1 point
    I wish I could limit the condo numbers...never a phone call...doorbell...someone is here! I don't know what they would do if we were out of town, they come unannounced, with no money for return trip, no food and expect to stay a week or more...Good point about the onward ticket for family members...That cost is expected also.
  29. 1 point
    I think that it’s been pretty well documented over the years on this forum and others that, foreigners are by the majority, expected to foot the bill for parties and get togethers. Same goes with inviting a few and the whole family shows up. It is, what it is, set the ground rules ahead of time if you want to deviate from what is considered their norm. If I attend any get togethers or have dinner with folks here, I am already resigned to the fact ahead of time that I’ll be the one footing the bill. With that in mind, it doesn’t happen very often. I also limit the number of any family members staying at my condo to 2 at any one time, along with a set departure date and an onward ticket. 😂
  30. 1 point
    As another member recently said: “When In Rome, do as the Filipinos do.” But I guess that you can also apply that to the Philippines as well, so: When in the Philippines, do as the Filipinos do.
  31. 1 point
    What's yours is theirs and what's theirs is their own!
  32. 1 point
    My wife always pays. Wait. That's my money. Nevermind!
  33. 1 point
    Why would you consider it a privilege? Upper class? I'd rather eat with people who aren't ashamed to eat with their fingers off of banana leafs. Much more fun and I can wear my shorts and flip flops.
  34. 1 point
    From the get-go I made it clear I was not going to be the typical big-hearted foreigner opening his wallet at every turn. That was maybe hard at the beginning but now we're reaping the benefits as nobody expects anything from us. Luckily, there are not too many foreigners around us setting a bad example!
  35. 1 point
    I've never had the privilege to dine with doctors and lawyers here but I would be upset too if they didn't ante up at bill time. Your average run of the mill Filipino though will always expect that if they are dining out with me and my wife that I will be paying. They might even have been the ones who invited us! You could be the poorest SOB in the Philippines but if your foreign, you are rich! Clap your hands at the sky and the money will fall down. Living here you have to limit who you hang out with and who you go to dinner with or you will go broke. I'm a cheap ?????? and it definitely limits my social life here. And that extends to the in laws too, when we visit there I'm expected to pay for the meals and entertainment basically everyday. Welcome to the Philippines!
  36. 1 point
    You think the thread has reached a... tipping point?
  37. 1 point
    Kuripot is correct.
  38. 1 point
    I thought it was Kuripot? (There is a good chance I'm wrong but I'd like to know either way if anyone knows)
  39. 1 point
    That's the problem with paying customs - they become so complex and it can take the fun out of dining out. Years of experience have taught me that it's best to clarify in advance (through partner etc) what is expected. Than we can all relax and enjoy the food without having an eye on the upcoming bill.
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
    Ranting or not I agree with this post. You told them you would be here for a short visit. They took it upon themselves to organise a meal at a restaurant. Then they made you pay by not offering to pay part. I would take them off of your friend list because there are users who abused your wallet. In the past, I have been asked by locals who would not let me pay, they asked you to go for a meal but would not pay. If I asked my family out here I would pay.
  42. 1 point
    That reminds me of a fight that went on at a party for foreigners that I held at my place in Cebu some 11 years ago. I supplied the food and told the guests to bring some drinks. Well, two Brits got into it after they had been drinking a while. The first one had only brought a pint bottle of Tanduay and the other had brought a couple of liters of it. So #2 accused #1 of being a stingy b*stard drinking other people's drinks all night and #1 blamed me for not spelling out exactly how many drinks to bring. I quit having parties for foreigners after that. Edit: sorry for going off topic again @gaga4 but it was my turn for a rant
  43. 1 point
    To come in on this and not to use the "Don't get caught a second time", the trick is not to get caught at all. On Saturday evening a family member suggested we all to out on Sunday for Fathers Day, so knowing what I know now I simply said "No, everywhere will be crowded and it is going to be another hot day, just come around here and we will have a late lunch, just bring some drinks". Now I have been bleating on this forum for some time about people not bringing anything, so I stressed the part "Just bring some drinks". Early Sunday morning I went to the marked and bought 3 kilos of chicken breasts and some onions, capsicum and bell peppers, took it home and concocted a sate chicken recipe, the gf threaded the sticks and got the rice going, bang a meal. The family arrived at 2 in the afternoon armed with wine, beer and soft drink. There is enough booze left over to last me for the rest of the week. So I reckon if you spell it out to people then they should know the drill, if not pull the welcome mat in on them.
  44. 1 point
    It is what it is... I found myself facing some quiet questions from a couple of family members after another westerner visited a family yaya, they weren't angry they were honestly surprised (and a bit sad for their yaya). Basically 'he organized a night at a hotel with food and swimming and then he and his girlfriend invited people' and he didn't pay (except for him and his yaya and her son). Why would he do this Geoffrey? He didn't have to have food and swimming with the family? It was left to my family members to make up the shortfall out of their weekly budget. They didn't ask me for money but they did end up having to remove the AC unit from the downstairs bedrooms (selling it I think) and also thereby reducing their electric spend to catch up on their budget. Sometimes the cultural differences create problems on both sides of the divide gaga4, my suggestion would be to say something along the lines of 'no budget' if you're asked for a group outing.
  45. 1 point
    Yeah, you might have misunderstood me a little bit. If you are in the states, you are a "dollar earner" also. So when the "poor relations" from the Phil. visit, not only will you be expected to treat but most likely let them stay at your house, unless you want to rent them a hotel room. Sounds weird doesn't it? But yet you have several guys who have been living here, or have been closely involved with Filipino culture for a long time (for me I married into it 25 years ago)(and I still get surprised at times ) so you can pretty much take it to the bank. You mentioned Thailand, I have not been there, but to Japan and Korea where if you are a guest you can leave your wallet at home so I know what you mean. It might help not to think of it as an Asian culture per se. It is a mixture of Spanish, American, Chinese with some of the old tribal customs mixed in. Usually in our view they took all the bad parts from each and left the rest Bottom line: IT IS WHAT IT IS.
  46. 1 point
    So DON'T! The Phils isn't for everybody and it certainly doesn't sound like it is the right place for you. It's a big world, look for another place that falls in line with your expectations.
  47. 1 point
    I do not see it that way. You just took one situation and applied it to every situation in the culture. If either of these people were having a birthday party then they would be the ones paying for everything and their guests would just show up and eat. It is not the same as in the USA. There are cultural rules about who pays for what. Not everyone obeys these rules. Some of the cultural rules have become outdated. For example, old school Filipinos will invite you to share their meal, all the time. But the first offer is politeness. If they ask again it is to show that they will share if you are hungry so dig in. If they ask a third time then they really do mean they would like you to join them and it would be rude to refuse to have at least one bite (unless you can come up with a face-saving refusal) Anyway, it's cultural whether you agree or not.
  48. 1 point
    1. Mentality of Pinoys "Foreigners are rich". Blanket statement, kind of like saying "All foreigners are arrogant, or rude, or condescending, or kuripot" 2. They are your guests - True, but you are applying American rules of etiquette to Pinoys. 3. Philippines not any cheaper - simply not true 4. Cheaper here is hogwash. The only reason it would be more expensive would be if you tried to recreate your USA lifestyle with food, cars, housing, clothing, etc. So for a given individual it might be hogwash. For the vast majority of expats it is cheaper to retire here. You have every right to be upset about having to pay for the dinner. However, that does not make your hosts "wrong", just as your resentment at having to pay does not make you "wrong". The culture here is that the one who can best afford to pay for the outing is expected to pay. My opinions of course.
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    You're the rich foreigner, why are you complaining. I think we all get caught by that one at first, not being caught the second time is the trick.
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