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sonjack2847

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Everything posted by sonjack2847

  1. I would not tie myself to anyplace until I lived there for a while. Siquijor looks very nice but is also very small and in reality not much to do once you have been there a month or so. Good luck Ross you never know it might be the perfect place for you the rest is just my opinion/experience here in the Philippines.
  2. Yes mine is built into the inverter. Always right has had this setup for a few years and his is still going strong.
  3. I read a story earlier that the UK has sent 500,000 doses over here. Yes only a small amount but if other countries follow suit then they will soon get through this I`m sure.
  4. My wife and 2 friends want to visit their families in Dalaguete Cebu do this is good news.
  5. Their name why would I be owning it? So I didn`t buy 3 lots for my wife, of course you can buy land you just cannot own it under normal circumstances.
  6. Buy a piece of land and put it in their name.
  7. That is what I have but with 1 battery it has worked for 6 hours watching tv on my pc and still had charge left. As for surge protecting the rest of the house on the important stuff I have individual devices.1 THING TO BE AWARE OF do not use an extension lead which has a surge protector in as this can damage the unit. I have the T shirt for that.
  8. very time I have been for an NBI clearance I have been flagged. When I asked I was told "oh we do that to all foreigners." Can you imagine the line at the entry points.
  9. I would willingly pay for some locals to get the jab but I don`t like to buy somebody a new car.
  10. It`s not so much the cost as the fact that we are usually charged more than locals which irks me.
  11. If the wiring is up to it yes, otherwise just more problems. The cables could burn through overheating caused by too much power going through them.
  12. Well it looks like expats will get the jab here but it has not been stated how much it will cost. COVID knows no nationality: IATF to craft vaccination policy of foreigners in PH Published February 22, 2021, 6:27 PM by Genalyn Kabiling The government pandemic task force is expected to craft a policy on the vaccination of foreigners staying in the country against the new coronavirus disease. Presidential Spokesman Harry Roque According to Presidential spokesman Harry Roque, it is important to have a policy on the vaccination of all people in the country for protection against the infectious disease. He said the coronavirus could affect anybody, adding it knows no ethnicity or nationality. “Wala pa po tayong ganiyang polisiya pero inaasahan ko po na bubuo rin po ng ganiyang polisiya ang IATF (Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases) kasi nga po iyong anyo ng COVID ay wala namang kinikilala iyan na nasyonalidad o kasarian o kulay ‘no. Pare-pareho po basta tao ay hinahawa niya (We don’t have a policy on that yet but I expect the IATF will craft such policy because COVID knows no nationality, gender or color. Any person can be infected),” Roque said during a televised press briefing Monday, Feb. 22 when asked if the government will give free vaccines to foreigners in the country. “So importante rin po na magkaroon talaga ng polisiya na lahat ng tao sa Pilipinas ay mabigyan po ng bakuna (It is important to really have a policy in which all people in the Philippines must be given vaccines),” he said. Roque made the statement ahead of the highly anticipated arrival of the first batch of coronavirus vaccines in the country. The country’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the vaccines developed by China’s Sinovac for emergency use for healthy persons aged 18 to 59 in the country. The FDA approval paves the way for the delivery of 600,000 doses donated by China in the coming days. China earlier opted to wait for the local regulatory approval before sending the vaccines to the Philippines. With COVID-19 vaccine orders placed with various manufacturers, the government aims to vaccinate up to 70 million people this year to help attain herd immunity. The government’s priority beneficiaries include frontline health workers, senior citizens, poor and vulnerable citizens, and economic frontliners. From the Manila Bulletin. https://mb.com.ph/2021/02/22/covid-knows-no-nationality-iatf-to-craft-vaccination-policy-of-foreigners-in-ph/?fbclid=IwAR1nPHvCPWmpgGHJILO_q8uOqoR79GhDKFH8Psfpt6WexeM2tZELd_KUfTM
  13. Very good advice as trying to get money back here will send you insane with all the excuses which come up.
  14. You only need a small crack in the rendering or at a roof junction and with the amount of rain we have water will find a way in. Once this starts it will get sucked in as the dryness inside acts like a sponge and draws it in. Sometimes just re painting the walls can work but you need a good trades man to work it out where the penetration is coming from. If you see a damp spot somewhere it does not mean the leak is in that area as water follows the easiest route and could be coming in 10 feet away. Good luck Jim.
  15. Not many of them have that, they don`t even have the screwdriver type to check if something is live. People here will often sell their tools after each job and hope the new boss buys new.
  16. From the UK to here the maximum I was allowed to transfer ( from my bank in uk to PNB here) was 10,000 UK. Transferwise has a max of 2000 UK. It`s a toss up which is more costly as initially TW is dearer than the bank by 8 pounds but has a better exchange rate and is faster, Having said that it would have been a lot of messing about with TW.
  17. Might take you up on that. Belcris here is fine but sometimes not much stock.
  18. Now and then we can get some really nice food here but the supply is erratic, plus people bulk buying and hoarding. This is why we started BB boxes not just for cheese but other things we cannot easily source here.
  19. I had more cheese delivered in January. It had sweated quite a bit. I take it from the ref each day and turn it, the liquid warms up and does seep back into the block. This makes it softer and more tasty. Si all in all not a bad thing to send cheese in a balikbayan box.
  20. By accident I found some channels which I can stream overseas channels on so I don`t need a VPN. They are limited but what the hell they are free, Thanks for all the reply`s.
  21. Well they have backed down now. rsula von der Leyen was sitting in her converted flat next to her office in the EU's palatial HQ in Berlaymont when the phone started ringing. It was Friday evening, around 9.20pm, and on the line was the British Prime Minister. Boris Johnson was demanding to know why the EU had invoked Article 19 of the Northern Ireland Brexit protocol, effectively blocking imports of Covid vaccines through the Irish Republic to the UK. At 9.50pm - about half an hour after the call had concluded - Number 10 issued a damning account of that call, saying that the PM "expressed his grave concerns about the potential impact which the steps the EU has taken today on vaccine exports could have". An hour after their call - around 10.30pm London time - Mrs Von der Leyen called back making clear to Mr Johnson that the EU would not disrupt vaccine supplies into the UK. Number 10 stressed there were no raised voices on the calls, but it was a torrid end to what had been a dreadful few days for the EU - days had seen the Commission accused of trying to bully the UK and drugs companies into giving up Britain’s share of precious vaccines. Mr Johnson and his team in London had caught wind of the Commission's plans earlier last week, but chose to adopt a low key approach, arranging for a call between Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, and his counterpart in Brussels on Wednesday. By Friday morning the talks had "gone up a notch" and the emerging crisis was discussed at the Prime Minister's 8.30am meeting in Number 10. Although officials had been gaming what the Commission might do and how the UK would respond the response from the Commission to invoke Article 16 of the Northern Ireland protocol still came as a shock. Following a meeting between Mr Johnson and his senior officials Number 10 made public the concerns in London, saying they did not expect the EU - a “friend and ally” - would do “anything to disrupt the fulfilment of these contracts." Mr Johnson decided to call Micheal Martin, the Irish Prime Minister, to discuss the Commission's actions. Again concerns about peace in Northern Ireland were raised and the PM stressed the UK’s enduring commitment to the Belfast/Good Friday agreement. Mr Johnson then phoned Mrs von der Leyen. By now the warnings about threats to the Good Friday Agreement had been heard in Washington DC, where sources said the White House was urgently trying to clarify what the move would mean. In the face of such raw anger and growing international concern, Brussels backed down. Just before midnight UK time on Friday Ms Von der Leyen posted a message on Twitter saying she agreed with Mr Johnson not to add restrictions to vaccine exports. It was a week that began very differently. Brussels had been determined to force AstraZeneca to its knees. It ended, however, with the European Union humiliated. Mrs von der Leyen was facing calls to resign on Saturday, and fierce criticism in her home country of Germany. It was after all the Commission President who, having taken personal charge of the AstraZeneca issue, and was now seen to have badly botched the response to the pharmaceutical company’s failure to fulfil EU orders of jabs. By moving to impose a “vaccine border” on the island of Ireland she was seen as having trashed the bloc’s reputation worldwide and sacrificed the moral high ground the Commission had taken over the Irish border during the Brexit negotiations. Her decision to trigger Article 16 of the Brexit treaty’s Northern Irish protocol, achieved the once unimaginable feat of uniting an unimpressed Michel Barnier, Irish prime minister Micheál Martin and Boris Johnson against her. Mrs von der Leyen may have ordered a U-turn late on Friday and blamed the crisis on “an oversight”, but the damage was done. This was written on Saturday by James Crisp of the Telegraph
  22. I paid 90k for a Suzuki multicab and spent 27k on it to get it to my standard. I have not really had to do much maintenance since.
  23. I can curse without any reason to so that point (for me) is mute. As somebody wrote before they could have been really chitty about it and the drunk guys there probably would have gotten arrested.
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