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UnCheckedOther

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UnCheckedOther last won the day on February 6 2015

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  • Birthday August 12

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    Gryffindor Tower, Hogwarts Castle, Scotland
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    Linguistics, travel, folklore and mythology, game theory, sailing, rowing, opera (Gencer and Callas!), theatre, writing, indigenous language and culture revitalization (focus on Kanaka Maoli/ 'Olelo Hawai'i, Tsalagi/Cherokee, Euchee/Yuchi, Irish Gaelic), spoken word poetry/slam poetry, Womanist movement, cooking and eating

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  1. Jack,what I meany about more fart friendly is that generally, Asians are more comfortable with expelling/disposing of bodily fluids than their Western counterparts ie hocking a logie on the streets, utinating outside. Culturally it's more like, "It's unhealthy for you to hold it in, so go fart/pee/spit so your health does not suffer." With other cultures, it's more about rules! Propriety! What will others think? Of course, despite its Spanish influence and Spanish last names, the Philippines is Asian in mentality, so it's fart friendlier. But yeah...gastroentestinal issues are probably at the root. Not that I'm a fart expert, but a short burst every couple of hours should be okay. A frequent, prolonged, and "wet" sounding one would be different.
  2. Eh, I think farting is a natural thing and that people should fart for health purposes rather than hold it in, but years of etiquette instilled in me by my family still make me politely step aside/go into the ladies room to freely fart. It's got to with diet, for sure, as well as health issues. If your SO is a fan of beans, then that could be it. Is she mixed Chinese? Again, I'm using my mom's side of the family as reference, but I noticed that the Chinese branch is more fart-friendly than the Spanish branch.
  3. KatsGMA, safety is relative. Your son would be safe by himsef if he were to walk around Rustans but in Gaisanano Mall in Colon? No way. I've felt safer in some dodgy parts in Cebu (ie: the Santo Nino Church area) than I did in the "safer" parts of Philly (museum area). As long as he practices common sense and avoids dodgy people, situations, and places, your son should be okay.
  4. Bob, congratulations! Who cares if you're 57 and if she's 22 as long as you love and respect each other? I know that you're getting antsy about getting married now, but in the meantime, maybe you could talk to Av's mom about family or cultural traditions that she would love to see at your wedding. Of course it'll be Av's and your big day and your wants are paramount, but including your MIL in parts of the wedding planning means that it will be more meaningful.
  5. Jon1, MANGO wine? Would you care to share tips on how to make that? My heart just jumped at how delish that sounds.
  6. Ooops...edited to say "pahng-AH-lahn" and not pahnh-AH-lahn.
  7. Thomas, Bisaya is easier to understand than Tagalog, I think. For the most part, Bisaya and Tagalog are easy to pronouncr except that Bisaya has those pesky NG sounds ie ngano man? (Why?) which is a sound that's uncommon to N. American and most European languages. It usually ends up sounding like GAH-noh man? and NAH-noh man? Tagalog has it, too, but is usually preceded by a consonant blend so it's easier to break down and pronounce ie pangalan (name). You can pronounce it as pahnh-AH-lahn quickly and it sounds right.
  8. Jack, yes, I would still feel the same way even if I lived in the Philippines. No matter what country or culture I'm surrounded with, I've always tried to live my life according to how I see fit. I suppose I'm not easily as influenced or affected by how society or other people think I should be simply because I'm more logical than emotional (as how I've observed a lot of Pinoys to be ie onion-skinned). I'd rather be an imperfect Leilani rather than a robotic standard or ideal of someone else. Culture and the environment we live in are very important, for sure. They are the ingredients to the clay, but there's also much to be said about the fact that people have the power to choose how to mold themselves using that clay. For example, I grew up with both sides of my family hating the Japanese because of WW2. My lola saw her dad being bayoneted by a Japanese soldier in Samar and quite a few relatives on my dad's side of the family died in Pearl Harbour. There was an inheritance of anger passed down through the generations; my lola threatened to disown any of her kids and grandkids if we ever had a Japanese friend or boyfriend/girlfriend. But eh. That anger shizz is too heavy and the son should never be persecuted for the sins of his father. Needless to say, I have a lot of Japanese friends and dated a half-Japanese dude whose grandfather was sent to a concentration camp. A person is a part of his or her culture. A person is a part of a collective. However, a person is their own self, first and foremost. Jack, thanks for your questions and observations. You remind me of a professor I had at uni who taught us not just to think critically, but meaningfully as well. You weren't a Philosophy or Anthropology professor, were you?
  9. Back when I was 14 and went out on my first date, my Cebuana mom was horrified and wondering why I was "in such a rush to find a husband," much to the amusement of my American dad. When I explained to her that it was just a dinner and a movie with our group of friends, my mom told me that in the Philippines that was still a big deal. She said that in the Philippines there's this thing called pangulitaw/panliligaw (courtship) wherein the dude has to woo the girl. If the girl likes him back, then there's an MU/mutual understanding. After that is going steady. So what is a getting to know stage (dinner and movies) for us Americans or Westerners is essentially a "steady bf/gf" thing to do. The Pinoy version of getting to know each other is through the courtship stage. I'm technically a halfie, so one could argue that my upbringing in the US has something to do with it, but I am definitely in the camp of a Pinay chick not wanting to rush into marriage. I will get married when I feel ready, not because there are certain tick marks I have to cross off at certain ages/milestones. There shouldn't be a timeline. I will get married because the man I'm with is someone with whom I want to spend my life, not because it is my duty to get married or because other people will talk.A wedding is simply a legal or religious celebration; you don't need a ring or a name change to have that commitment. I also think that for the most part, the modern and empowered (well-educated, well-travelled, and those with higher profile/prestige careers) Pinay are less likely to rush into marriage because they realize that they have more options. They know they can buy what they want and they know they are complete and fulfilled despite the Pinoy culture's emphasis on marriage and motherhood being as the apex of a Pinay's identity.
  10. Just remember that Pilipino languages mostly rely on short vowels ie: Asa ka adto? (Where are you going?) is "Ah-sah kah adh-toh" rather than "ay-sah kah ad-toe." If you know some Romance languages (Spanish, Italian, French, Latin, Romanian...), you'd find it easier to pick up Bisaya. (Cebuano is the dialect.) W/r/t to slangs, it's usually just the first syllable of the word plus an S ie: guapa (beautiful) becomes guaps and naku (oh) becomes naks. If it's a word with a first syllable that's too common or too uncommon, then the last syllable is used minus the S ie kumusta (how are you) becomes musta and ig-agaw (cousin) becomes gaw. It's just something I learned after almost going nuts when trying to read through texts, e-mails, and status updates from my Pinoy relatives :)
  11. Jack, I've had lamb in Cebu before. Rack of lamb with rosemary mint sauce at some upscale restaurant. Amparito, I think it was called. That was more than a decade ago. I've also had lamb mixed with beef as shawerma at the mall. So delicious! My mom absolutely hates goat because of the smell and avoids lamb because they are "cousins". (Goat and lamb, not mom and lamb :) )
  12. As soon as my thumbs find their way out of the snow piles of Boston, I'm holding them up to say heck ya to you, Jack. There is a difference between wants and needs, and oftentimes when people say they possibly canNOT live on 3k or whatever each month don't really want to. Merton's Theory of Self-Fulfilling Prophecy. You can still have some of our Western comforts but just in a Filipino way or in moderation. You cannot have it all at 100% so you need to figure out which one is your top priority. Even when you're operating at 75 ot 80% of your ideal lifestyle, it's still yours. The whole keeping up with the Joneses is BS, IMHO. Do they pay your bills, retirement, or your kids' education? Did they give birth to you or donate an organ to you? There's no need to impress them. You're not an important part of their lives, so why the heck would you waste yours trying to measure up to them?
  13. My lola's embutido, which she calls morcon, is something I could eat every day but is too labour intensive to make. Thankfully my mom is amazing and makes it for me every so often. My mom's family frowns on me eating street food, so whenever we visit the Philippines, I sneak out to eat them. My dad was my accomplice :) Now I still crave avocado, cheese and corn, and ube ice cream as well as those fish ball things you dip into the sweet brown sauce. I used to love lechon but then that movie "Babe" came out. Just as I was getting over that trauma (as a grown ass woman), of course that cute disabled pig Chris P. Bacob popped up on my FB feed :(
  14. You men are amateurs...Jollibee/McDo? Just bring your ladies to Larsian and have a nice romantic stroll at that fountain place across Robinson's. Who needs a romantic horse-drawn carriage ride when you have a friendly, slightly panting from exertion trisikad (tricycle but with a bicycle) ride or a safe habalhabal (motorcycle for hire) for two plus the driver?
  15. Ugh...gifts, not gives. This snowstorm is making my brain go pffft.
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