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peterfe

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Everything posted by peterfe

  1. Well, yes, red flags indeed... This woman who the Englishman met only briefly in March and has been chatting with him ever since has only just recently told him that she has four children. I think you should be upfront about things like that, in fact that's one of the advantages of dating sites. The important practical details are there for you to see before you even start writing.
  2. Well, I'm sorry but I don't see how you can get to know someone better by writing to them for months. Much of the basic information is already on these dating sites anyway, age, any children, smokes/drinks, religious or not, etc. Then you maybe need a couple of weeks to find out some other things and then I think you should MEET HER!! Still, I asked for opinions and I got one...
  3. I wonder how many Westerners have joined Filipinocupid and these other sites recently, with no prospect of meeting the girl(s) they're writing to for months and months? We know a girl who's been writing to a man in the US for two years and they still haven't met. I met an Englishman here in March who met a woman quite briefly, and at the time he didn't seem particularly interested in her, but since then they've been corresponding and will maybe continue to do so until flights resume. Maybe I'm missing something here, but I can't see ANY POINT in writing to someone for months and months before getting to know her properly. If I was alone in a Western country now and wanted a Filipina partner, well, I might look at some profiles now and make a few notes, but I wouldn't start writing to anyone until max. two months before I was 100% sure I could travel. Any thoughts on this?
  4. I think one of the lockdown rules that is actually in effect in Sweden is that you're not allowed to visit seniors. Anyway, comparing very different countries is futile. If there was another country very similar to the US that had tried a different system, maybe we could say something. Of course there are more mental health problems, suicides, domestic violence, job losses, etc. under a lockdown, and some weeks ago I was wondering whether lockdowns were worth the cost, on balance. But having looked at the recent figures for some countries I know well, I've come round to the idea that lockdowns are the best solution.
  5. On April 5th, I wrote this: "Well, the article in The Australian sparked a bit of a debate, which was the idea. I really have no idea whether the Wuhan way, the Swedish way or any other "way" is the solution." I had posted an article from an anti-lockdown commentator in Australia and at the time the Covid-19 figures for Sweden (which didn't have a lockdown, bars and restaurants were open) were similar to those in Norway and Denmark. Well, I've just looked at daily new cases for Sweden for the first time since the beginning of April, and they are still at the same level! Whereas cases in all the other Scandinavian countries have decreased a lot! And since Australia also seems to have managed very well with its lockdown since then, there seem to be very strong arguments in favour of lockdowns, however inconvenient we may find them. If you still have any doubt, take a look at the figures for Sweden and Norway, two very similar countries in terms of healthcare, climate and way of life.
  6. Well, that's fine. Chacun son goût. Some want to meet other foreigners, some don't. It would be a sad state of affairs if all the many foreigners who don't want to chat were wife-beaters!
  7. One thing I've learned is to keep an eye/ear on the news - I've had periods of my life when I scarcely listened to the news for weeks on end - and if Covid-19 or any other virus looks like it might cause trouble on this kind of scale, to make QUITE SURE I'm in the country where I want to be for the next several months. And that is not the cold, expensive UK!
  8. This MGCQ is the best news I've had for a long time! https://news.mb.com.ph/2020/05/16/barbershops-dine-in-services-religious-gatherings-to-make-comeback-under-mgcq/ Now we just have to wait for the next stage (MGCQ), where the most important thing for us oldies is "everyone shall be allowed outside their residence". I honestly thought the next stage would be PMGCQ or OVSMGCQ (partially... only very slightly...), whereby seniors would only be allowed out one day a week, or only allowed to go for a walk but not to the mall, or something.... MGCQ sounds great!
  9. Haha As I'm over 65, I won't be rubbing cheeks with any salesgirls for some time to come, even under GCQ. So I'm afraid you'll have to wait quite a bit to see whether I drop dead after 14 days (I'll try to post my dying words on this forum before I go).
  10. This has no doubt also been mentioned many times here, but there are quite a few Filipinas (and Asian girls in general) who are very submissive and willing to put up with a lot more than most Western women. One of my partner's friends wanted to find a foreigner online and I asked her things like "Does it matter if he smokes?" "if he's not a Catholic?" "how old he is?", etc. and she just said "any, any!" So some men use this to their advantage and treat their wives/partners badly and don't want to get to know other foreigners who might have different views and spoil their little set-up. After all, you can go to the police and have someone deported for domestic abuse (we know a case).
  11. That brings me to my point about common sense, which would suggest that even if aerosol spreading occurs, it is much less likely to cause infection. So until someone convinces me otherwise, I would say it involves an extremely small risk to talk to a shop assistant at a normal distance.
  12. I haven't had time to read all this thread and I don't know many other foreigners here, but I must say I've noticed a difference between here and another country with a lot of expats where I've been, Saudi Arabia. There, and generally in most places around the world, if you try to engage in small talk with a foreigner you don't know, they will normally answer you, smile and sometimes talk some more. Here I've found a number of foreigners make it quite clear in that situation that they don't want to talk to you, much less get to know you. Something to hide? I really don't know...
  13. OK Geoff, I won't say a------e again. I'm glad you replied anyway, because I was considering going off and increasing the lockdown suicide statistics as nobody seemed to care about my post After all, what is life worth if you don't get hearts and likes
  14. I lived in Scandinavia for a long time, and maybe I'm biased, but I tend to think the information provided by the health authorities there is as factual and objective as any. The Danish health authorities say the coronavirus is not airborne (I believe the WHO is still saying that), and the Norwegians say it's not "normally" airborne. Whatever the truth is, I think common sense tells us that you're FAR more likely to get infected if someone coughs or sneezes on you than if they talk to you. And it seems those who believe it can be airborne (how easily?) only think it can happen if the other person talks (and presumably is facing you). So I would guess it's well nigh impossible to get the virus from standing behind a stranger in a queue, even if that person is talking to his friend. Or even from talking to a shop assistant, unless that person puts their face really close to yours.
  15. Well, I hope you're right for the sake of those poor souls whose three years will be up soon, but I'm not so sure. I don't know if I would risk it. There is a difference: if you've been here for 1-2 years, you have a right to renew - you'll just be paying late. If you've been here for 3, you're not supposed to be here. If it got to the stage where you had to apologise and make a case for not having left, it would surely be an advantage to be a senior - as they seem to think that seniors are likely to drop dead if they go for a walk outside their house, it wouldn't be hard to convince them that you probably wouldn't survive a trip to the UK/US or wherever. (Whereas the statistics show that only about 15% die from Covid-19 even among the 'over 80s', which includes those who are 99)
  16. Thanks for the info, sounds good. I remember looking at the rules for various other countries many years ago, and I think the second best one after the Philippines was Peru, where a UK citizen could stay for 180 days, then do a visa run, and start another 180 days. And there were several Latin American countries where you'd have to cross the border every 90 days. So three years is quite exceptional!
  17. My partner has wondered a couple of times if the immigration rules will change when the Philippines gets a new president. Of course, nobody knows that, but I was wondering how long it has been so straightforward to stay here as a "tourist" with a visa run every three years. Was it like this under the previous president, and the one before? Was there a time when you had to do a visa run much more often, or even (groan!) only be allowed to stay for 180 days in every year, as in some other countries?
  18. On that page, you click on 'View detailed case information'. Then you get a table 'Cases and deaths by region and city'. So this morning I showed my gf that there were 1000 cases in Cebu City, 48 in Lapu-Lapu and only 20 in Cebu Province (where we are). I also said that the DOH figures are not fake news, unlike much of what you read on FB, etc. The other day she told me that Kim Jong-un had died and went into detail about how, and she's often come up with dubious figures about the number of cases around here
  19. Well, if this ban on tourists entering drags on for many months, sooner or later there will be one or two people on this forum who find themselves in that situation. Though if they decide to stay here, they may keep quiet about it. I agree that it will probably be ok, if you play your cards right. As soon as the ban on tourists entering is lifted, you buy a ticket to HK or somewhere, take it along to the BI along with plenty of cash, be polite and apologetic and wear reasonably smart clothes. If your gf is good at talking to such people, bring her and e.g. her mother, have them wait outside and only use them if you seem to be getting nowhere. Alternatively, have a coffee with the boss of the BI to see if you can sort something out.
  20. You may not think so, in the never-ending lockdown, but the Philippines is almost certainly the only country where most of us can stay as "tourists" for three years. Statistically, most of us have still got 1-2 years to go, but there will have been some unlucky ones whose three years were almost up, and they had to decide between leaving and not seeing their gf again for a (very) long time and staying on illegally after the three years (don't know what happens then!). My point is that if you'd decided to find a gf in Taiwan, Thailand or almost anywhere else you would have had visa runs much more often and would have had to leave already. As it is, most of us are sitting pretty, we can be with our gf, and by the time our three years are up we will hopefully be allowed to leave and come back.
  21. In case you haven't had enough of Coronavirus statistics, here are some that concern the little ones: The Philippines seems to have no plans on reopening schools in the near future. Denmark has already done so - with a population of about 5 million compared to the Philippines over 100 million, Denmark has had only slightly fewer new cases over the last seven days. France is opening schools in May - with a population of about 60 million, it has had almost ten times as many new cases as the Philippines in the past seven days. I could continue...
  22. I don't know what it's like where you live, but here (Cebu province, village - over 65s and under 18s not allowed out) people seem to be easing the lockdown themselves now. In the beginning people seemed afraid of the police, only letting their children play very near their house and telling me, a senior citizen, not to walk in the countryside any more. But the weeks have passed, nobody has seen any police cars on the main road driving at normal speed, and now the kids fly their kites in a field in full view of the main road. There is a police checkpoint at the entrance to the village but only for a few fixed hours every day, so people take their children or grandparents on short trips, first in cars but now also on motorbikes, i.e. much more visible, at the times when they know the checkpoint isn't operating. This is a fairly small community, with a lot of gossip, and many people have an extended family member in the barangay or the police. It's almost as if they have insider knowledge, that the lockdown really is going to be eased on May 15th in this area, and not just extended again.
  23. Well, I hope they think this thing through very carefully. So you get through check-in and security standing one metre apart, so far so good. But then sometimes at the end of security there's a guy who starts fingering you to see if you have anything hidden under your clothes. Maybe the person he fingered before you had the virus - is the security guy going to thoroughly sanitise his hands/gloves between each traveller?
  24. Wow, I didn't know that - I haven't smoked since I was eleven, but maybe I should start again now... Even if you could get straight back to the Philippines, there are almost no countries in the world that would let you in right now. Hong Kong is an exception, though. If you fancy spending two weeks in quarantine in an expensive hotel, your prize at the end of it would be to move freely around Hong Kong (unless you got caught up in clashes between pro-democracy and pro-Beijing supporters, of course).
  25. Some domestic flights in Thailand are set to resume, and here are the measures to be implemented (I imagine we can expect much the same in the Philippines): "They included designating empty seats in each row to keep passengers a fair distance from one another, while no food or drink is to be served during flights either. On flights of 90 minutes or longer, the whole row at the back of an aircraft must be left vacant and reserved for passengers who display flu-like symptoms. Passengers must bring their own face masks to wear on an aircraft but are barred from bringing their own food to eat on board. Cabin crew must also wear face masks, gloves and a face shield for the duration of a flight. On the ground, social distancing must be practised at check-in as well, Mr Chula said." Well, I don't think I'd miss the food served on the Cebu-Manila flights, but I wonder how they'll solve that problem on a 12-hour flight to Europe? Good to see that you're (apparently) allowed to bring your own bottle of water (if you can buy one after the security check!). Are we going to have to pay twice as much for a ticket when they only use half the seats?
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