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KurtVD

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KurtVD last won the day on June 20 2018

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About KurtVD

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  1. Well, Tramadol is definitely NOT a ‘heavy-duty’ opioid, and I'm afraid that it won’t do much once her cancer has progressed to a certain stage. As I mentioned in an earlier post, it’s considered to be approximately 1/10 the strength of morphine, and from my experience that’s about right (I got a morphine shot once in the ER, and Tramadol is nothing compared to it, I was quite surprised). I have no idea how restrictive they are with morphine in the Philippines, I guess eventually she'll need morphine or something equally strong.
  2. Is there a difference between opiates and opioids (I don’t think so)? Otherwise you’re wrong about this, since you can get Tramadol in any pharmacy (Mercury, TGP and others), and it’s classified as an opioid.
  3. Are you sure about the dosage though? I have never seen (or heard of) anything smaller than capsules or tablets containing 50 mg, which is the usual dosage. In some countries you can also get 100mg pills, or little bottles with liquid Tramadol - was it the liquid one? But how did you know that it was exactly 7.5mg? And unless you are allergic or sensitive to it, 15mg would probably not do anything at all. There’s a chart where different painkillers are compared to morphine, and Tramadol and Codeine are both classified equally strong, at about 1/10 the strength of morphine, so it’s actually not even that strong. The problem really is the potential addiction problem.
  4. Yes, it can be addictive, however it’s not such a big deal to wean off of it, if you don’t need it anymore and have the determination to stop taking it. But it’s true, it’s a (synthetic) opioid, if you use it regularly and after a certain time, you will get the full blown symptoms of opioid withdrawal, and that’s no joke.
  5. Good call, I’d also recommend to try it when you don’t have to drive a car
  6. Maybe you don’t necessarily need one all the time, but I’m quite sure that it’s a prescription medicine here in the Philippines too, e.g. it’s possible that the pharmacist won’t sell you any, and then you have to go to another pharmacy, which isn’t fun if you’re in pain...
  7. Not every airline sells these seats though, some give them for free to people with very young children, people with disabilities and then on a first-come, first-serve basis. Check if you can reserve your seat right when you buy your ticket, you might get lucky.
  8. Actually, the Thai Tiger balm patches are not necessarily the best ones you can get, there’s other brands as well, although I have no idea if you can get them here. I’d go and see at one of the large pharmacies (like Mercury) what they have, it might be worth the effort.
  9. Probably a stupid suggestion, but have you tried a simple patch? Like in Thailand, you can get Tiger balm patches, they can help a little in some cases. Or is that what you mean by Ace bandage?
  10. There’s an alternative to Premium Economy, depending on your needs and wants it’s better AND cheaper than PE: For example KLM (Dutch airline) sells their seats at the front of each economy section for a reasonable fee (about 70-80$ for Phils to Europe flight), and these seats are really quite good: there’s no extra padding, reclining or lumbar support, but you get quasi ‘unlimited’ legroom, nobody’s sitting in front of you and you can sit at the window yet still get up whenever you want, without asking your seat neighbors to let you out. One big minus though: They usually give the seats in the middle to families with children, so getting sleep isn’t always easy (most modern parents think that their noisy kids are ‘cute’, even if they wake up the rest of the plane around them...)
  11. Someone I knew used to get this type of pain in his knees, and he usually got some type of injection directly near the affected area. I think it was Cortisol and not just a painkiller, because after one of these shots he was much better for weeks at a time. But if you don’t wanna see a doctor and you’re limited to OTC drugs, it’s going to be difficult....
  12. Interesting, I didn’t know that you can get Ibuprofen as a skin cream. However, my endocrinologist once told me, that as a general principle, if a drug/substance has a particular side effect, one will get that side effect no matter how the substance gets into your body, so what you’re saying is certainly true. Re:eating before taking the pill: I think that’s also recommended in the patient information, but for some people, especially if taken regularly, that’s not enough and when in doubt, better take something to protect your stomach.
  13. Long-time chronic pain sufferer here, let me add some pieces of advice here: 1. Tramadol is very effective, but it can be addictive, so you have to know what you’re doing. Withdrawal cold-turkey style is not something you wanna experience. It’s only suitable for chronic pain treatment if you’re very aware of the risks and can handle them. Otherwise only minor side effects like constipation (only ‘mechanical’, can easily be decongested with the bum gun hehe...) 2. Ibuprofen is used a lot for back and joint pain, but it’s very “aggressive” to your stomach , stomach bleedings occur frequently (watch for dark-black stool, other sign is a ‘growling’ stomach). If you wanna take it regularly, ask your doctor (or pharmacist) for something that protects your stomach, you’ll be taking this (second) pill whenever you take an Ibuprofen - it’s worth it, believe me.
  14. KurtVD

    Smelly Condos

    I guess if it’s your home you’re better off finding a solution that doesn’t require you to cover the drain, but for a quick fix, a towel is easy to get and quite effective.
  15. KurtVD

    Smelly Condos

    A little late, but here’s a tip that works if there’s a bad smell coming from the drain in the shower, very common in Southeast Asian countries. Someone showed me this “trick” when I was staying in a hotel where the smell was so bad I couldn’t sleep: Cover the drain with a wet towel. Obviously it’s just a temporary fix...
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