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I'm reaching out to any members on the ground there who may for whatever situation suffered a handicap ie.stroke victim, either before or during the time there .

Q: how has it been adjusting while there.acceptance of your condition by the general pop. finding good therapist to work with you through your recovery.

Q: did it effect your decision to move there if it happened before you arrived?

Q: your outlook on the situation.

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I'm reaching out to any members on the ground there who may for whatever situation suffered a handicap in.stroke victim, either before or during the time there .

Q: how has it been adjusting while there.acceptance of your condition by the general pop. finding good therapist to work with you through your recovery.

Q: did it effect your decision to move there if it happened before you arrived?

Q: your outlook on the situation.

Hi Wayne, Jack P here, :tiphat: I can only tell you my own story, I had a stroke in April of this year and had some stent Surgery done in the UK, in May, my Carotid Artery on the left side was at a 60% reduction, I was lucky. I decided to take early retirement, I came home to my little Family in June. This to me is the best thing I could have done, I have the Love and Affection of my Wife and daughter, the TLC that goes with it and an extended Family that have been great. Adjusting for me in this case was pretty good. Of course it is a day by day thing Plenty of Exercise, with out too much Stress. the general Pop thing is not a problem as strokes are quite common here according to my GP WHO! might i add, has been fantastic. Dumaguete is not known for it's medical competence but my GP is Cardiovascular trained in manila and Does his surgery in Cebu you will be better placed in Cebu for any hospital treatment you may require.

He found the same drugs I was having in Europe and the cost was not as high as I thought it would be. If you have no wife and family here in the PI yet, I am assured, that there are many nursing graduates with no work, you should be able to employ a helper Maid with some medical training maybe some cooking and WOW life good, with out the nagging.

:unsure:

As to my outlook, providing I take things easy, not to much stress and keep up the exercise and keep the medications going. Diets are good now, I should be able to look forward to another 20+ years. Wayne! it is really down to what you are looking for, the help is there, as i said i am lucky, I had my family here before it happened and I am just having to take a year out, although we are still moving on with the house build. Now I am home and feel so much better, I will not let it affect me.

Not sure if any of this helps you but I am always around if I can be of any help to you.

Regards Jack P. :tiphat:

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I don't have a name for a medical doctor, but you might want to hire someone who can provide therapy, monitor your condition under the supervision of a doctor, and make sure you are taking medication. It is also nice to have someone nearby who knows CPR.

Latest BBC News Report is a surplus of 200,000 nurses. The number is expected to increase because the nursing schools are adding 80,000 a year. There are not enough domestic and overseas jobs for them. You can hire a highly qualified registered nurse or certified nurse aide for around $350 a month plus room and board. Avoid the $200 range. It has nothing to do with competence level.

The temptation is to hire someone who is young, beautiful and a recent graduate. Don't. This $200 group is more likely to have applied for overseas work in countries like Canada, the United Kingdom and Israel. For example, the State of Israel offers 10,000 visas a year for skilled workers to care for their elderly. They are paid minimum wage, which is between $1,000 to $1,500. This is a huge sum compared to the Philippines. The need pocket money and room & board. The employee will leave you once the visa is approved. Sometimes you get a week's notice. Oftentimes, they simply disappear. It is culturally embarassing to inform an employer that you are leaving. The reason is this indicates a lack of loyalty and appreciation for being given employment in the first place.

Edited by JJR
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I don't have a name for a medical doctor, but you might want to hire someone who can provide therapy, monitor your condition under the supervision of a doctor, and make sure you are taking medication. It is also nice to have someone nearby who knows CPR.

Latest BBC News Report is a surplus of 200,000 nurses. The number is expected to increase because the nursing schools are adding 80,000 a year. There are not enough domestic and overseas jobs for them. You can hire a highly qualified registered nurse or certified nurse aide for around $350 a month plus room and board. Avoid the $200 range. It has nothing to do with competence level.

The temptation is to hire someone who is young, beautiful and a recent graduate. Don't. This $200 group is more likely to have applied for overseas work in countries like Canada, the United Kingdom and Israel. For example, the State of Israel offers 10,000 visas a year for skilled workers to care for their elderly. They are paid minimum wage, which is between $1,000 to $1,500. This is a huge sum compared to the Philippines. The need pocket money and room & board. The employee will leave you once the visa is approved. Sometimes you get a week's notice. Oftentimes, they simply disappear. It is culturally embarassing to inform an employer that you are leaving. The reason is this indicates a lack of loyalty and appreciation for being given employment in the first place.

Thanks for all your advise, at this time I'm doing not so bad in my recovery however my left arm and hand needs plenty of therapy will need a good pyso-therapist to work with me but sounds great the NO STRESS PART. I'm coming from a very high stress environment, ( which is probably what helped cause the stroke in the first place), looking forward to that RnR. Just making sure to have a sound survival plan in place first. those prices are in US dollars?

Edited by wayneseymour
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Oh no! Not the dollar/peso again! Hehe! ;)

Usually we post in pesos but sometimes you will see a price listed in $. JJR did his in US$ I believe.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Guys

I'll be retiring to the Philippines next year and currently have a muscle wasting disease of the legs that will in all probability see me in a wheelchair within a few years, does anyone out there have experience of getting around in a chair in the philippines. Also do they have disabled driver permits etc.

Thanks

Brian

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Hi Guys

I'll be retiring to the Philippines next year and currently have a muscle wasting disease of the legs that will in all probability see me in a wheelchair within a few years, does anyone out there have experience of getting around in a chair in the philippines. Also do they have disabled driver permits etc.

Thanks

Brian

My wife had a friend who married a guy that used a wheel chair, they lived in the Philippines for a while and he ran a site about using a chair in the Philippines but having just looked it up, it now looks like its not maintained anymore, but with a bit of searching around you might find his contact info this is his site it still has some relevant pages

http://cebuonwheels.tripod.com

this page although old might still be of some use http://www.globalacc...ubantayan06.htm

J

Edited by johnb
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Here in Manila/Makati going around in a wheelchair is a real challenge. Although the local governments are required to adapt roads and pedestrian ways for the disabled, it is very poorly executed. Pedestrian paths next to roads range from wide to very narrow (or not existing) littered with utility posts & cabinets and trees and other obstacles. It is already a challenge to walk on some pedestrian ways in the Metro. With the current weather passing over the Metro the road are in bad shape with massive potholes here and there. In the shopping areas, I have seen disabled in electric wheelchair going around with ease but once outside you need someone to help you get along.

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Several of the newer resorts and a few condominium projects are ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliant. They are using ADA certification as part of their marketing. One of the buildings in Tagaytay City we are using for our Overseas Alzheimer's Care project has been modified for the handicapped. It includes extra wide doors and curtained showers for wheelchairs. These are the exceptions. Most of the country is not prepared to accept the disabled.

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