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Can Your Children Get An Adequate Education In Cebu?


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My use of the word, "elite" might have been a mistake because it stirs up all kinds of stereotypical imagery starting with the United Kingdom where it refers to a privileged ruling class, whether or not it is deserved. I meant to use it to mean a superior pedagogy practiced by some of the private schools. Of course, the high tuition would automatically eliminate even the brightest students from attending the school. Our alumnae association is trying to correct this injustice by raising the first P100 million for an education trust. It's either your parents can afford the tuition or it is paid from the trust fund, but the basis for selection is academic promise. 

 

The majority of private religious schools still use the knowledge method. All public schools in the Philippines use the knowledge approach, which relies heavily on rote memorization. 

 

My wife and I never trusted the school system. We spent hours everyday, especially my wife, providing the supplementary education our children deserved. The reward was both of our children are considered academic elite (my apologies for using the word again) in the same manner that gifted athletes are recruited by American universities for sports and given free tuition, room and board. University representatives and their alumni network came calling with all kinds of offer. Let's just say, we didn't have to pay for their college education.

 

It's true that many parents don't feel they are directly responsible for the education of their children or don't make the time. Our family is probably in the minority, but I am not complaining.

Edited by JJReyes
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None of the schools I ever attended were sufficient by themselves, learning must occour at home also. Your children can get an education anywhere, how much they need to learn at home may differ though.

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None of the schools I ever attended were sufficient by themselves, learning must occour at home also. Your children can get an education anywhere, how much they need to learn at home may differ though.

Yes. The oppinion of the parents, their TRYING to assist with home work, are very important.

An investigation in USA show Chinese kids got significant better academic results than expected from the sum of the OTHER factors than that.

(I believe I read somewhere it's something similar for South Koreans living in the Philippines.)

 

BUT I have noticed it seem more common among abroad living Chinese to push their kids to hard, forcing them to attend EXTRA school during Saturdays and Sundays  =To litle rest and play time   :(     That's why I plan to have home schooling 1-2 days per week INSTEAD of going to the normal school these days.

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Did you know that it is quite easy to get a tutor for your child if you live near a university?  Many students earn their daily spending money - and some their daily groceries - by tutoring!  

 

As for the level of teaching in the Philippines?  I have met 3 families with children recently who have moved to Canada from the Philippines.  All the children attended regular public schools throughout the Philippines - Cebu, Davao and just outside Manila somewhere I didn't recognise at the time.  Once they were in Canada, they were tested to ensure they would be placed in the appropriate grades for their knowledge.  One boy, who was always more interested in Basketball than school, dropped back a class to Grade 2.  Two others were advanced a year beyond their normal placing.  The other 4 were considered to be just normal average children with weaknesses and strengths throughout.  

 

As an interesting side note:  The boy who loved basketball more than school?  Once he found out that basketball was invented by a Canadian sports coach and teacher (James Naismith), 6 years of hard worek has him now advanced one year beyond his regular grade and he is working towards being a Physical Education teacher.  He really does (in his words) "suck at basketball though".

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TITLE: Can Your Children Get An Adequate Education In Cebu?

 

Yes, I believe so based on my current observation of students attending public high school here in Cebu City, Guadalupe.  This opinion is based on just one week of observation. 

 

It appears that they do what I have come to consider 'the normal Filipino thing' of make the best with what is available and keep going forward.  They may be short of technology, books, room, etc. but everything NEEDED is here and they use it.  Because of space limits some of the students go to school from 4-9 pm Mon-Fri and then attend on Saturday to get the rest of their time in.  WOW!  I have never even dreamed of something like that.

 

One particular student I know is second year high school.  That is grade 9 here.  It would be grade 10 in the USA.  He is learning about cultures all around the world and algebra right now.  Seems about right to me.   :thumbsup:  The students I know have a lot of family involvement.  That really makes a difference.

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Title: Education in Bacolod

 

My daughter just started 1st year med tech.

In PI, it is a 4 year course, likely only recognized in the PI and pays 8,000p/year. In Canada, it is a 34 week course, recognized world wide and pays $50,000/year.

Class starts at 7:30 AM to 9:00, then nothing until 2:30 to 6:30 PM. 

Courses include the History of Rizal, religion, singing, PE, etc.

 

I am hoping to bring both daughters to Canada next year.

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Title: Education in Bacolod   My daughter just started 1st year med tech. In PI, it is a 4 year course, likely only recognized in the PI and pays 8,000p/year. In Canada, it is a 34 week course, recognized world wide and pays $50,000/year. Class starts at 7:30 AM to 9:00, then nothing until 2:30 to 6:30 PM.  Courses include the History of Rizal, religion, singing, PE, etc.   I am hoping to bring both daughters to Canada next year.

 

We have visitors in town and one of them wants to apply with the University of Hawaii, John Burns College of Medicine. The out-of-state tuition is $60,000 a year. The in-state tuition is $30,000. I am suggesting the Philippines where the tuition is much lower. So long as his application is accepted by the ten top universities recognized by accrediting organizations, he can work in the United States after passing the state licensing tests.  

 

Another visitor with the visiting group is a med tech. She is a graduate of the University of Philippines. Her degree and credentials are recognized worldwide. Hospitals hire her as a trainer because she do lab tests with both highly sophisticated equipment and manually (i.e., microscope looking at samples). In an emergency when equipment are useless without electricity, American and Canadian trained med techs cannot do the lab work.

 

By the way, when the power is down, supermarkets shut their doors. The reason is cashiers are dependent on bar codes and scanners. Merchandise no longer have individualized prices.  

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By the way, when the power is down, supermarkets shut their doors. The reason is cashiers are dependent on bar codes and scanners. Merchandise no longer have individualized prices.  

 

I was in the SM Mall supermarket at the checkout when the power went out. All the checkout counters just keep on going except mine. Looked like they must have had individual UPS units for battery backup except the one at my checkout counter wasn't working.

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Earthdome, I was referring to American supermarkets. The Philippines still has frequent brown outs or black outs. I assume they have generators and batteries as back-ups.

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. In Canada, it is a 34 week course

Be sure to distinguish between  Medical Lab Technician and Medical Technologist degrees.  The Technologist is a 4 year science degree.  The MLT is a 3-4 semester course with a heavy emphasis on practical work. There is a year of prerequisite courses needed before entering the MLT program.  The Canadian program you mentioned sounds like an MLT program -- both are good career choices, the Technologist offers much more opportunity for career growth .

 

Just a word on graduates of non-US medical schools wanting to work in the US. All medical school graduates, domestic or foreign, must complete a 1-3 year residency program before obtaining a medical license. 

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