Why So Many Names For The People Of The Philippines?

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Posted

Almost every country I can think of only has one name for its people. Why so many names in the Philippines?

 

USA = Americans

Canada = Cadianians

France = French

Germany = Germans

Mexico = Mexicans

China = Chinese

Japan = Japanese

Russia = Russians

Brazil = Brazilians

 

Philippines = Filipino = Male or Female

Philippines = Pilipino = Male or Female

Philippines = Filipina = Female

Philippines = Pilipina = Female

Philippines = Pinoy = Male or Female

Philippines = Pinay = Female

 

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Posted

I don't think Pilipina/Pilipino is a word, just a misspelling. 

Here is a wiki about Pinoy; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinoy

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Posted

The country was named after Felipe II, a Spanish king. It was known as Filipinas until the Spanish-American War. The Americans won, so the spelling changed to Philippines. Both the "F" and "P" versions are acceptable. Pinoy and Pinay are relatively new words, I think it was popularize during the Taglish (Tagalog-English) period when newspapers and radio commentator combined words from both languages.

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Posted

Gee...  I didn't know that we Canadians were also called "Cadianians"...

 

:mocking: 

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Posted

What no Australians

Auzzies  ozzies

land of oz

down under :cheersty:

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Posted

Gee...  I didn't know that we Canadians were also called "Cadianians"...

 

:mocking: 

 

Among other things ......... :hystery: :hystery:

:cheersty:

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  • 10 months later...
the_whipster
Posted

no offence but this is a bit of a silly topic. Don't just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants like pinoy? As noted Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders are also Canucks, Ozzies and Kiwis. And plenty of countries have different expressions for male and female inhabitants, Italian women can be signoras (married) and signorinas (unmarried). In fact I tend to lean towards this usage this of Filipina to refer to unmarried women only. Whereas married ones are Filipinos.  I remember once years ago I was texting with a married lady of good education and excellent English, and she wrote, 'I love being a Filipino!' She did not refer to herself as Filipina. If she had been single, then maybe she would have referred to herself as being a Filipina.

 

as far as I understand it Pilipinas is the name of the country (at least that is what it is called on passports), and that people are not referred to by that word. British people have United Kingdom passports. That does not mean they are ever called United Kingdomers, any more than Americans are ever called United Statesians.

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Posted
In fact I tend to lean towards this usage this of Filipina to refer to unmarried women only. Whereas married ones are Filipinos. I remember once years ago I was texting with a married lady of good education and excellent English, and she wrote, 'I love being a Filipino!' She did not refer to herself as Filipina. If she had been single, then maybe she would have referred to herself as being a Filipina.

 

The term "Filipino" is correctly applied to nationality.  Hence, they are called Filipino nationals regardless of gender or marital status.

Even in song, it is "Ako ay Pilipino", meaning "I am Filipino".

Now, to add a gender classification, it becomes "Ako ay isang Pilipina" for females, or, "I am a Filipina".

Of course, when used with descriptives, as is often the case with single females, it goes something like "ang dalagang Pilipina".

Now, if a married woman is deemed to be beautiful, she remains a "magandang Pilipina".  Her being a Mrs. will never qualify her as a "magandang Pilipino".

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Posted (edited)

no offence but this is a bit of a silly topic. Don't just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants like pinoy? As noted Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders are also Canucks, Ozzies and Kiwis. And plenty of countries have different expressions for male and female inhabitants, Italian women can be signoras (married) and signorinas (unmarried). In fact I tend to lean towards this usage this of Filipina to refer to unmarried women only. Whereas married ones are Filipinos.  I remember once years ago I was texting with a married lady of good education and excellent English, and she wrote, 'I love being a Filipino!' She did not refer to herself as Filipina. If she had been single, then maybe she would have referred to herself as being a Filipina.

 

as far as I understand it Pilipinas is the name of the country (at least that is what it is called on passports), and that people are not referred to by that word. British people have United Kingdom passports. That does not mean they are ever called United Kingdomers, any more than Americans are ever called United Statesians.

 

Yes, just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants or are called slang names by other countries, but the several names used in the Philippines for it's inhabitants are not slang names, they are words from their language.

 

Americans are called Americans because its the last word in the name of the country, United States of America.

Edited by Americano
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