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Why So Many Names For The People Of The Philippines?


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no offence but this is a bit of a silly topic. Don't just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants like pinoy? As noted Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders are also Canucks, Ozzies and Kiwis. And plenty of countries have different expressions for male and female inhabitants, Italian women can be signoras (married) and signorinas (unmarried). In fact I tend to lean towards this usage this of Filipina to refer to unmarried women only. Whereas married ones are Filipinos. I remember once years ago I was texting with a married lady of good education and excellent English, and she wrote, 'I love being a Filipino!' She did not refer to herself as Filipina. If she had been single, then maybe she would have referred to herself as being a Filipina.

as far as I understand it Pilipinas is the name of the country (at least that is what it is called on passports), and that people are not referred to by that word. British people have United Kingdom passports. That does not mean they are ever called United Kingdomers, any more than Americans are ever called United Statesians.

Yes, just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants or are called slang names by other countries, but the several names used in the Philippines for it's inhabitants are not slang names, they are words from their language.

Americans are called Americans because its the last word in the name of the country, United States of America.

You mean they aren't United Statarians?

:)

Sent by using a very long piece of string, a couple tin cans, 2 gaseous monkeys, Tapatalk and my Nexus 4

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no offence but this is a bit of a silly topic. Don't just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants like pinoy? As noted Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders are also Canucks, Ozzies and Kiwis. And plenty of countries have different expressions for male and female inhabitants, Italian women can be signoras (married) and signorinas (unmarried). In fact I tend to lean towards this usage this of Filipina to refer to unmarried women only. Whereas married ones are Filipinos. I remember once years ago I was texting with a married lady of good education and excellent English, and she wrote, 'I love being a Filipino!' She did not refer to herself as Filipina. If she had been single, then maybe she would have referred to herself as being a Filipina.

as far as I understand it Pilipinas is the name of the country (at least that is what it is called on passports), and that people are not referred to by that word. British people have United Kingdom passports. That does not mean they are ever called United Kingdomers, any more than Americans are ever called United Statesians.

Yes, just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants or are called slang names by other countries, but the several names used in the Philippines for it's inhabitants are not slang names, they are words from their language.

Americans are called Americans because its the last word in the name of the country, United States of America.

You mean they aren't United Statarians?

:)

Sent by using a very long piece of string, a couple tin cans, 2 gaseous monkeys, Tapatalk and my Nexus 4

 

 

Some countries call us Yankees but we don't call ourselves Yankees. Yankee is a slang name, its not a name in our language for our inhabitants.

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are you serious. Some, in fact even many, people from the from the former confederate states call northerners Yankees even today. The expression Yanks is still in common use in British English as well as other English dialects like Australian and they can use it to describe all Americans which is of course wrong. Is somebody from Maine or Massachussets going to be all that offended at being called a Yankee as somebody from Tennessee or Georgia easily might?

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Yes, just about all countries have slang names for its inhabitants or are called slang names by other countries, but the several names used in the Philippines for it's inhabitants are not slang names, they are words from their language.

 

I beg to differ.  Pinoy and Pinay are slang terms.  They are short form for Pilipino and Pilipina.

Their alphabet does not have the letter f (unless that's) changed.  So, Filipino and Filipina are English terms.

As for the rest of the terms in your original post, they are just differences in gender.  No different from other languages that differentiate by gender.

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I WAS NOT AWARE THAT THERE WAS NO F IN THE PHILIPPINES.  SOME ONE HAS TH TELL MY WIFE THAT HER NAME IS NOT FE BUT PHE.

 

GOOD LUCK.

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I WAS NOT AWARE THAT THERE WAS NO F IN THE PHILIPPINES.

 

So, How do they Fill up with Gasoline, Fetch a husband, his Beer, What happens when they get a Fine, As per Normal,  rule bending, they will arrange it, so there is an F when they, need it  :thumbsup:

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I WAS NOT AWARE THAT THERE WAS NO F IN THE PHILIPPINES.

So, How do they Fill up with Gasoline, Fetch a husband, his Beer, What happens when they get a Fine, As per Normal, rule bending, they will arrange it, so there is an F when they, need it :thumbsup:

That's why you hear so many English words mixed in... If it has an F, check the language! :)

Sent by using a very long piece of string, a couple tin cans, 2 gaseous monkeys, Tapatalk and my Nexus 4

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I left one out, a girl called Phredelyn although i very much doubt that it was spelt like that on her birth certificate

 

Frederlyn is probably the commonest girls name there is in the Philippines beginnig with the letter F, I've come across several called that. However I have never heard of any British or American girl called that, so it is not like it has been 'borrowed'.

Edited by the_whipster
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I WAS NOT AWARE THAT THERE WAS NO F IN THE PHILIPPINES. SOME ONE HAS TH TELL MY WIFE THAT HER NAME IS NOT FE BUT PHE.

 

 

Fe is Spanish for faith.  They borrow heavily from Spanish names.

 

Their alphabet is as follows, with each consonant pronounced with a short A sound at the end:  A,B,K (no C either),D,E,G,H,I,L,M,N,NG,O,P,R,S,T,U,W,Y.

 

There is a pop ABC song, which I shall attempt to attach...hope it works.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47OxI3wRpVY

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