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Why So Many Names For The People Of The Philippines?


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The name Frederlyn sounds like a combined name.  Filipinos like to combine the husband's name and wife's name and bestow such combinations upon their children.  It's a little surprising that there are many Frederlyns though.  I wonder if that was the name of someone famous at one time.

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I WAS NOT AWARE THAT THERE WAS NO F IN THE PHILIPPINES. SOME ONE HAS TH TELL MY WIFE THAT HER NAME IS NOT FE BUT PHE.

 

 

Fe is Spanish for faith.  They borrow heavily from Spanish names.

 

Their alphabet is as follows, with each consonant pronounced with a short A sound at the end:  A,B,K (no C either),D,E,G,H,I,L,M,N,NG,O,P,R,S,T,U,W,Y.

 

There is a pop ABC song, which I shall attempt to attach...hope it works.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47OxI3wRpVY

 

 

Going by the alphabet that you provided they don't have a C, F, J, V, X, or Z in their language, but you didn't say which language you are referring to. Their official English language has all 26 letters and is taught in all schools.

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The name Frederlyn sounds like a combined name.

it is not that. Filipinas follow the Spanish tradition so have their mother's maiden name as their second name out of the three they are initially given - until they get married when they drop their mother's name completely and their father's name, previously their surname, becomes their second name, so Jeaneth Cataluna Rodrigo becomes Jeaneth Rodrigo Robinson when she marries a kano called Robinson.

 

Fredelyn is not a common first name but I have met/seen more than one.

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I WAS NOT AWARE THAT THERE WAS NO F IN THE PHILIPPINES. SOME ONE HAS TH TELL MY WIFE THAT HER NAME IS NOT FE BUT PHE.

 

 

Fe is Spanish for faith.  They borrow heavily from Spanish names.

 

 

 

Going by the alphabet that you provided they don't have a C, F, J, V, X, or Z in their language, but you didn't say which language you are referring to. Their official English language has all 26 letters and is taught in all schools.

 

it is the Roman alphabet, previously the Greek, not the English alphabet. That is where those 26 letters come from.

 

obviously in the Philippines, people were exposed to the Roman alaphabet during the Spanish colonisation period, which lastest a great deal longer, than either of the subsequent colonisations.

Edited by MikeB
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Going by the alphabet that you provided they don't have a C, F, J, V, X, or Z in their language, but you didn't say which language you are referring to. Their official English language has all 26 letters and is taught in all schools.

 

It is Tagalog (or Pilipino if people still insist that they are different).

Yes, the English language is official, and which is why I said that Filipino and Filipina are English terms.

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forget the R. That is, the name is FREDELYN.

 

Sorry about that.  I went by your post.  Now that I look back, it did initially say Phredelyn.  In the next paragraph though, it said Frederlyn.

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it is not that. Filipinas follow the Spanish tradition so have their mother's maiden name as their second name out of the three they are initially given - until they get married when they drop their mother's name completely and their father's name, previously their surname, becomes their second name, so Jeaneth Cataluna Rodrigo becomes Jeaneth Rodrigo Robinson when she marries a kano called Robinson.

 

I am aware of that practice.  A lot of single Filipinas use their mother's maiden name.  Even men (married) or otherwise can and do as well.

 

I was speaking of first names.  For instance, Maria and Celestino = Marcel. 

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it is the Spanish way to do it like that, with the naming. Nearly all the personal names and also place names in the Philippines, are Spanish. I have never met anybody in the Philippines, who did not themselves have a Spanish name, or come from a Spanish named town. It is zero.

 

but not hardly any of them, despite that, can speak the Spanish language!

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Sadly, the use of Spanish has declined over generations.  My wife still speaks it passably well.  When we visit Spanish speaking countries, the locals generally remark at how well she speaks it. 

 

Actually, she starts out rusty, but gains fluency fairly quickly.

 

Her ancestry is Hispanic.  In fact, her paternal grandmother could not speak Tagalog, and her father generally conducted conversations with his mother in Spanish.

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