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Average Filipino Family Income About 20,000 Pesos A Month


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No Tom, its EASY to find low paid domestic workers, to easy,,,,whats hard is finding one you can a) trust, b) actually works diligently and c) gets along with the Asawa. In our case the maid is not only a maid, but a bit of a companion to the wife, watch Sir Chief and Maya together while they prepare lunch, gossip together (cheese whiz  :no:  ). Like most things in life, it is sometimes worth paying a bit more for quality.

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But then what do you do in the case of an emergency like when an ambulance comes to your door at 2 AM with your nephew unconscious from a motorcycle accident and his wife asks for money to take him to

No         Yes         No       Exactly   Sorry for the short answers but I don't have a clue as to why they do it ...... or a solution to it ...... well some don't but the majority

In a previous post, Globe Telecom, I  explained how they do averages in private, public schools and colleges. They divide the upper number by the lower number, then add 25. For example, if the exam ma

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its EASY to find low paid domestic workers, to easy,,,,whats hard is finding one you can a) trust, b) actually works diligently and c) gets along with the Asawa. In our case the maid is not only a maid, but a bit of a companion to the wife, watch Sir Chief and Maya together while they prepare lunch, gossip together (cheese whiz    ). Like most things in life, it is sometimes worth paying a bit more for quality.

Exactly, but I agree that in general foreigners pay more. We pay ours double the minimum with a lot of extras because she's good and good ones are damn hard to find.

The Kasambahay Law protects the kasambahay against abusive employers by giving them direct access to a desk at every Dept of Labor office that is setup to do nothing but process complaints against employers. At least that's the directive from the Secretary of Labor. But what protects the employer against dishonest helpers who will steal them blind at every opportunity and even set up robberies against their employers? That is a far more common situation than the other. BTW, kasambahay is a Tagalog word meaning "family member". It's Filipine tradition to treat them as such. 

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No Tom, its EASY to find low paid domestic workers, to easy,,,
If it was me you called "Tom"  (In Sweden that's a separate name, so if shouting "Tom" then no Thomas would react  :) 

then that was what I said, when someone else said other   :)

Like most things in life, it is sometimes worth paying a bit more for quality.
I agree. (In general I pay some more than average, when I have employed in Sweden too) But that's an other question  :)
The Kasambahay Law protects the kasambahay against abusive employers
Good. That's surely needed much to often.
But what protects the employer against dishonest helpers who will steal them blind at every opportunity and even set up robberies against their employers?
I agree that's a big problem. But that's an other question  :)

That's one of the reasons I don't want any helper at all in my home   :)

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Here's a "funny" question:

 

Is sending $1200 (average) a month to the Philippines (Leyte) too much for my two step-kids and mother-in-law?

 

I definitely think so, but they always have a break down of what they're spending money on and then it seems hard to argue. I know that I spent that much and more easily when I was there, but I'm a notoriously bad spender. 

 

Some of that average is spent on medical emergencies, immigration stuff, and school things. 

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Is sending $1200 (average) a month to the Philippines (Leyte) too much for my two step-kids and mother-in-law?

 

I think you have to ask if its too much 'for you'.  How well do you want them to live?  If I answered the question 'for me' I would say it is too much.

 

Instead of asking them for a breakdown of how they are spending your money, I would suggest giving them an amount that you are willing to contribute and asking them for a budget of how they should spend your money

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Is sending $1200 (average) a month to the Philippines (Leyte) too much for my two step-kids and mother-in-law?

 

I think you have to ask if its too much 'for you'.  How well do you want them to live?  If I answered the question 'for me' I would say it is too much.

 

Instead of asking them for a breakdown of how they are spending your money, I would suggest giving them an amount that you are willing to contribute and asking them for a budget of how they should spend your money

 

 

It's been tough because we were in the center of Yolanda and had our house destroyed. After that we amended my wife's permanent resident application in Canada for her kids to be "accompanying," rented a place in Cebu, and have been having trouble with the kids applying for passports as minors without their mom who's in Canada. If they don't need more money for this document or that, it's a trip back to Cebu and then back to Leyte and back to Cebu, etc. There's been some health issues with her dad and a funeral for an uncle as well. On top of that, the kids had graduation stuff and needed clothes and blah blah blah blah blah. Every time I put my foot down, there's something that comes up and becomes a question (accusation) from my wife of, "Fine, I'll just tell them to stay there. I don't wanna bring them to Canada. I just wanna go back to the Philippines."

 

Because of spring break up in the oilfield I probably won't have any money to send them til mid-June, so this time I wasn't bluffing when I said they have to make the money last. 

 

When I complain to my wife about all the Filipinos that live on 20,000 pesos a month, it becomes a big fight full of ugly accusations. If I'm really heated I'll say something like she probably has a whole house and property that I'm not even aware of, lol. That doesn't go over well. 

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So if the average filipino family is getting by on 20,000 pesos a month.

 

oh no they are not. As the headline says, it is 20,000 per month PER FAMILY, which could be two people, or 20 people. And that is the nation as a whole including Manila and the NCR where incomes and prices are higher than elsewhere.

 

it has gone up a bit. Maybe three years ago they were saying the average income per family was 17,000.

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Is sending $1200 (average) a month to the Philippines (Leyte) too much for my two step-kids and mother-in-law?
Well. You tell about Yolanda damage, hospital, extra documents for moving... Not odd such cost much.

But I wouldn't give them 1200 USD per month for NORMAL living costs for doing nothing...

When I complain to my wife about all the Filipinos that live on 20,000 pesos a month, it becomes a big fight full of ugly accusations. If I'm really heated I'll say something like she probably has a whole house and property that I'm not even aware of, lol. That doesn't go over well.
Not suprising  :)    

But I find her playing the "guilt-card"  much to much, although you are sending 1200 USD per month allready :bash:    I find that being a huge warning sign... :unsure:

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The answer here, is, well to me anyway, just not totally answerable. The Topic started "AVERAGE" The longer I am here, the more I understand, the way our loved ones and their Families are.

 

I am Not sure, to be honest, that there is an Average Filipino family.

 

to Quote, an old adage from the 50's 60's " The More they have, the more they Want/Need." I have come to the conclusion  that many here, Do Not, Understand the difference between, NEED and WANT.

 

In the UK, we call the type of living here, " Keeping up with the Jones's"  Until they come to terms with Living beyond their means, we, (the Foreigner) will just have to keep, bailing them out.

 

 It is their way of life and I doubt any of us, will ever change that.

On many occasions over the last 2/3 years I have said, "WE, the Foreigner have made a rod for our own backs, we came, we saw, we wanted, we got. Now we have to pay for it, They never needed, the sort of money  they say they need, before we arrived.

 

As Dave said, Give them a Budget, let them make that Budget work,  If they can't OK, go back to the drawing board. If they just ask for more, return the question with a OH! Please justify that request. If we keep giving More and More each Month, the Spiral starts

 

 

 

:tiphat:

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Some of that average is spent on medical emergencies, immigration

 

post-2148-0-63938900-1399783906.jpg

 

 

So you they have medical emergencies every month :unsure:  this, i would definitely, question. Who's immigration stuff? whilst they are in the PI, they have no immigration to deal with, if they were in the US, you would deal with it there.

 

I have to say, if this was me, I would be hearing the Warning bells loud and clear.  :rolleyes:

 

 

$1.200 a month, That's 2.4 times the average, contained in this Topic we are talking about. With that sort of money, you could run 2 families, mmm maybe you are :rolleyes:  Stranger things have Happened.

 

 

 

:tiphat:

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