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English In Filipinos Colleges And Universities

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Is there such a thing as a Philippine English dictionary? I'm kind of curious to see if all the mispronunciations and misspellings I encounter out here are actually good Philippine English.

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Is there such a thing as a Philippine English dictionary? I'm kind of curious to see if all the mispronounciations and misspellings I encounter out here are actually good Philippine English.

 

Sure, I see stacks of them an National Book Store.

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This article is in today's Manila Times. As I had posted earlier, you have to want to speak English to be able to speak it. You can study grammar but will not be able to speak English until you can think in English, not translate Tagalog sentences into English. You have to try and practice to be efficient.

 

http://manilatimes.net/how-to-improve-your-written-and-spoken-english-by-really-trying/77414/

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This article is in today's Manila Times. As I had posted earlier, you have to want to speak English to be able to speak it. You can study grammar but will not be able to speak English until you can think in English, not translate Tagalog sentences into English. You have to try and practice to be efficient.

 

http://manilatimes.net/how-to-improve-your-written-and-spoken-english-by-really-trying/77414/

 

I fully agree with you. A person cannot fluently speak English until they can think in English. I learn that in the 1970's when I married a Vietnamese and took her to the USA. She reminds me of Filipinos who can only say a few English words at a time. It takes them too long to translate words from their native language to be fluent in English.

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This article is in today's Manila Times. As I had posted earlier, you have to want to speak English to be able to speak it. You can study grammar but will not be able to speak English until you can think in English, not translate Tagalog sentences into English. You have to try and practice to be efficient.

 

There are five levels of proficiency when learning to speak a new language. The highest is "Native Speaker" which includes the ability to think and speak in the language without hesitation. Most students of language aspire for 3rd Level Proficiency which includes the ability to speak, read and write in the language. 

 

I can get by in most countries by selecting key words that can be understood. In Japan, you don't asked, "Where is the nearest train station?" Most will excuse themselves even if educated Japanese supposedly spent eight years studying English. I just ask, "JR?" universally understood as "Japan Railway." The same for words like "soft-drink," "beverage," "soda-pop," etc. Just say, "Coke." Other English words that are universal include, "taxi", "pizza" and "beer." 

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Is there such a thing as a Philippine English dictionary? I'm kind of curious to see if all the mispronunciations and misspellings I encounter out here are actually good Philippine English.

 

I don't know for sure but I believe mispronouncing English words comes from parents and teachers who do not know how to pronounce the words correctly.

 

A good example is, This May a 1st cousin is coming to live with us who pronounces her first name as Annjaniece ( Ann/ja/niece ) When I asked to see her Birth certificate I discovered that her name is actually two names Ann Janice.

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It takes them too long to translate words from their native language to be fluent in English.

 

Koreans for the most part are the same way.  Despite studying English for many years, and being able to read English out loud perfectly, conversational ability in English just seems to elude them.

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My language speaking proficiency in a non English speaking country is a negative -5.

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Is there such a thing as a Philippine English dictionary? I'm kind of curious to see if all the mispronunciations and misspellings I encounter out here are actually good Philippine English.

 

I don't know for sure but I believe mispronouncing English words comes from parents and teachers who do not know how to pronounce the words correctly.

 

A good example is, This May a 1st cousin is coming to live with us who pronounces her first name as Annjaniece ( Ann/ja/niece ) When I asked to see her Birth certificate I discovered that her name is actually two names Ann Janice.

I guess, but as a Spanish speaker, I can't help but noticed how they've managed to destroy a whole lot of Spanish words. Those words are all part of the Filipino language now though. You could certainly speak Tagalog without using any bastardized Spanish, but I don't think anyone does outside of an academic setting. So I'm wondering the same thing about all the inconsistencies I see in Philippine English. Is it that most Filipinos don't learn proper English, or are they speaking correct Philippine English?

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Is there such a thing as a Philippine English dictionary? I'm kind of curious to see if all the mispronunciations and misspellings I encounter out here are actually good Philippine English.

 

I don't know for sure but I believe mispronouncing English words comes from parents and teachers who do not know how to pronounce the words correctly.

 

A good example is, This May a 1st cousin is coming to live with us who pronounces her first name as Annjaniece ( Ann/ja/niece ) When I asked to see her Birth certificate I discovered that her name is actually two names Ann Janice.

I guess, but as a Spanish speaker, I can't help but noticed how they've managed to destroy a whole lot of Spanish words. Those words are all part of the Filipino language now though. You could certainly speak Tagalog without using any bast---ized Spanish, but I don't think anyone does outside of an academic setting. So I'm wondering the same thing about all the inconsistencies I see in Philippine English. Is it that most Filipinos don't learn proper English, or are they speaking correct Philippine English?

 

 

It would be really hard to speak Tagalog without Spanish loan words.  I'm sure the French say the same thing about how English has disgraced the French words they have adopted.  Language is a living, evolving entity and how the native speakers use it makes it correct regardless of academic tut-tutting.  Frankly, I have to turn on the subtitles on videos if it features Irish, Scottish, Australian or Cockneys cause I can't understand what they are saying -- and it is supposedly English!

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