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Ged Exam In Philippines?


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First of all, for those not familiar with American school system, GED exam is a set of five tests that gives those who did not complete high school in the USA the opportunity to earn their high school equivalency credential in the USA.

 

It seems likely that my fiancee will be moving to the USA for a few years yet before we reconsider moving to the Philippines full time. She has a Philippines high school diploma from a provincial school in Leyte, and she also completed first year of hotel and restaurant management studies in a local college, until the family ran out of funds and she had to move to Manila and start working as a maid to fund the younger siblings' schooling.  As many of us know, Filipinos graduate from high school after just 10 years of schooling vs. 12 years in America and most European countries, so it is reasonable to presume that my fiancee's education even with one year in college is not comparable to a western high school diploma. It is our hope that after moving to the USA she will either go to some sort of college to get at least a 2-year associate degree for a better employability. Or even if she just chooses to try to get a job without any additional training, most US employers I know of require at least a high school diploma even for simplest jobs. And here I'm primarily thinking about jobs that a 4'11, 85 lb Filipina can do, as her physical capabilities limit her to somewhat lighter types of work.

 

So, with that I would like to hear about some prior experiences about Filipinas getting qualified to apply into US post high-school education.  Was GED always required? Did they take the test in the Philippines or in the USA?  How challenging was the test for a high school graduate from the Philippines? Did succeeding in GED require lots of studying in advance?

 

Additionally, I would like to hear about various experiences of "simple" Filipinas getting employed or into post high-school school system in the USA.  Thanks.

Edited by Pettersson
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As many of us know, Filipinos graduate from high school after just 10 years of schooling vs. 12 years in America and most European countries

 

Three years ago, the PI changed to 12 years of schooling (K12) Both of my daughters did 12 years before college. One in public and one in private. Next year, (maybe) they are changing their school year to start in August, not June as was before. Both changes are to align with the rest of the world. Not sure about the August start as Canada starts the day after the first Monday in September.

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Both changes are to align with the rest of the world.

 

 

 

:hystery:  :hystery:  :hystery: This, I gotta see, the RPI aligning with the rest of the world., This, would, be a  first. As we know, they normally do everything, in their power to be so very different, in all things. :rolleyes:

 

(sorry for the humour but JP, it really did make me smile. :) )

 

 

 

 

:tiphat:

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It is my understanding that as of this year the kids will have to go for an additional two years of high school before they can get a diploma .... which makes for a very interesting situation ..... that means for the next 2 years there will be no kids going to start college at least from graduating high school ..... I asked my asawa's ate about it and she said they have made arrangements ..... this would be a great time for those who can afford to to go to college as they won't have to compete for the first 2 years with graduating high school students .... but then I wonder if they will except students who graduated before with only 10 years with the new requirements now being 12 years ..... 

 

Yea I know it boggles my mind too with what I just wrote above .... so I'll just quit .... :tiphat: :hystery: :hystery:

:cheersty:

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As many of us know, Filipinos graduate from high school after just 10 years of schooling vs. 12 years in America and most European countries

 

Three years ago, the PI changed to 12 years of schooling (K12) Both of my daughters did 12 years before college. One in public and one in private. Next year, (maybe) they are changing their school year to start in August, not June as was before. Both changes are to align with the rest of the world. Not sure about the August start as Canada starts the day after the first Monday in September.

 

 

Yes I was aware of the change, but that has no impact on us because the fiancee graduated from the high school 9 years ago.

 

So I am trying to understand what kind of effort does it take for a Filipina who went through the older 10 year system to get GED and then go to college in the USA.

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It is my understanding that as of this year the kids will have to go for an additional two years of high school before they can get a diploma .... which makes for a very interesting situation ..... that means for the next 2 years there will be no kids going to start college at least from graduating high school ..... I asked my asawa's ate about it and she said they have made arrangements ..... this would be a great time for those who can afford to to go to college as they won't have to compete for the first 2 years with graduating high school students .... but then I wonder if they will except students who graduated before with only 10 years with the new requirements now being 12 years ..... 

 

Yea I know it boggles my mind too with what I just wrote above .... so I'll just quit .... :tiphat: :hystery: :hystery:

:cheersty:

 

The confusion continues. My daughter is finishing 4th year at UNOR. She already had their graduation prom. The parent's night is on March 20. She intends to start college this June at UNOR. Maybe Facebook will have the answer.

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When I got my GED 26 years ago when I was stationed at Ft. Bragg North Carolina, It was administered by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges and you needed a couple forms of valid ID and you could take the test (probably some fee involved but the army paid mine). If it's that way wherever you end up, I would recommend taking the test before enrolling in a course of study as a course of study may not be necessary. If you fail, then your significant other can attend classes. :)

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It is my understanding that as of this year the kids will have to go for an additional two years of high school before they can get a diploma .... which makes for a very interesting situation ..... that means for the next 2 years there will be no kids going to start college at least from graduating high school ..... I asked my asawa's ate about it and she said they have made arrangements ..... this would be a great time for those who can afford to to go to college as they won't have to compete for the first 2 years with graduating high school students .... but then I wonder if they will except students who graduated before with only 10 years with the new requirements now being 12 years ..... 

 

Yea I know it boggles my mind too with what I just wrote above .... so I'll just quit .... :tiphat: :hystery: :hystery:

:cheersty:

 

You are correct. I just find out that the ones finishing 3rd year next month will have to go 2 more years. The ones finished 4th year can go to college this June. Ten minutes ago, I found out that 8 teachers from UNOR High are coming for lunch with my daughter as she was chosen to speak at the Elementary School this afternoon. We had to add water to the soup.

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Ten minutes ago, I found out that 8 teachers from UNOR High are coming for lunch with my daughter as she was chosen to speak at the Elementary School this afternoon. We had to add water to the soup.

 

Just a comment. The 8 teachers from UNOR high school did come for lunch with their driver. Not one of them washed their hands before they ate nor did they wash their hands after they ate. We have 3 CRs, 2 kitchens, and 3 outside water taps. Just a comment.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Philippines does not have a GED exam, which stands for Graduate Equivalency Diploma. 

 

Philippines has an ALS exam, which stands for Alternative Learning System.

 

What is the difference between a GED Diploma and an ALS Diploma?

 

In the USA a GED is equal to a High School Diploma.

 

An ALS Diploma, which is only issued in the Philippines and signed by the Director of Education, is not always accepted in place of a High School Diploma. A school or employer in the Philippines can refuse to accept an ALS Diploma as a required qualification.

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