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Posted

This is an old news, but can be interesting for some different sections still anyway:

/It can be interesting if you have some young RELATIVE needing to know what to STUDY to get work, instead of study something Phils have houndreds of thousands TO MANY examed in allready.

/Or for foreigners trying to get WORK in Phils.

/Or if you think of starting a BUSINESS, so you know what's business skills can ADD, if you have such knowledge YOURSELF

/Or which BUSINESS to AVOID to start, if you need to employ such    :)

 

So I put it here   :)

 http://myfinancialcoach.ph/blog/jobs-foreign-workers

 (jan 2014)

The Philippines, one of the world’s largest exporters of labor, is now turning to foreign workers to address inadequacies in a number of professions.

Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz said yesterday the government is allowing the entry of foreigners to at least 15 occupations suffering from skills shortage.

In an interview, Baldoz said that based on a study conducted by the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE)’s Bureau of Labor and Employment Statistics (BLES), there is a need “to liberalize the labor market and allow entry of foreign workers with the required skills so we can fill up those hard to fill occupations due to shortage.”

Among the skills in the occupational shortage list are architect, chemical engineer, chemist, environmental planner, fisheries technologist, geologist, guidance counselor, licensed librarian, medical technologist, sanitary engineer, computer numerical control machinist, assembly technician, test technician, pilot and aircraft mechanic.

Baldoz said the list was derived from a series of survey and consultations with concerned stakeholders.

“From a potential of 40 identified hard-to-fill occupations, the list has been trimmed down to 15 occupations with each occupation defined by a standard qualification,” she added.

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

The DOLE chief explained that an occupation can be considered to be experiencing shortage when there is a high demand for the position but there are very few applicants, or when there are few qualified applicants compared to the number of available jobs.

“This is common in occupations which are numerically small within the total workforce, but the function is central to company operations such as pilot and geologist,” Baldoz said.

“Since there is a shortage, these occupations can be opened potentially to foreign skilled workers,” she added.

Baldoz said foreign experts who would apply for the listed occupations would be exempted from fee and other requirements in line with the country’s labor market test.

But she said the DOLE would also assist the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) to encourage students to take up the listed needed skills. “So up to a certain point when the shortage has already been addressed, we can go back to normal and hire local workers.”

She also said that the CHED is already undertaking measures to produce the required skills, while other government agencies are offering scholarships.

Meanwhile, the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), which has a much bigger budget for this year, has set a two million target in its training programs.

TESDA director general Joel Villanueva said that with his agency’s P5.11-billion budget, TESDA target could even get higher to provide more young people access to technical vocational education and training (TVET).

In 2013, TESDA targeted 1.8 million enrollees under its various skills training programs offered in training institutions, enterprises and communities.

 

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Posted

Well let me know when they want to teach their people to learn plumbing properly. They can put in a toilet in Dalaguete but to make it run properly they have no idea. And this is just one instance of lack skills.

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Posted

The highway and some bridges were rebuilt last year south of Bacolod all done by Korean engineers. A new highway was built last year from the airport to south Bacolod all done by Japanese engineers (and paid by Japan also). Either the PI does not have civil engineers, or they are not qualified or they are OFWs or all three.

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Posted

I think I will apply for a sanitary engineer position. I have been involved in this industry for 64 years, so have vast

experience. Then again it might be a shi..y job!

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Posted
or they are not qualified or they are OFWs or all three.

 

This is about the truth, most CE's go abroad, then come back and build houses Badly in many cases.

seems a little like the criminologist course, every one does them then No work :rolleyes: 

 

JP :tiphat: 

Morning All :morning1:  

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Posted

or they are not qualified or they are OFWs or all three.

 

This is about the truth, most CE's go abroad, then come back and build houses Badly in many cases.

seems a little like the criminologist course, every one does them then No work :rolleyes: 

 

JP :tiphat: 

Morning All :morning1:

This is what they call the Philippine Brain Drain... Many Filipinos who get their degree often are lured outside the country for work. It's hard to argue with that higher pay cheque!

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Posted

 

 

or they are not qualified or they are OFWs or all three.

 

This is about the truth, most CE's go abroad, then come back and build houses Badly in many cases.

seems a little like the criminologist course, every one does them then No work :rolleyes: 

 

JP :tiphat: 

Morning All :morning1:

This is what they call the Philippine Brain Drain... !

 

Not all those who work abroad actually know what they are doing. The last electrician who worked on my house had a job in Saudi Arabia, and showed me his ID there. He couldn't grasp the concept of a " electrical ground". Almost nobody grounds their outlets here, but I did and after a very long discussion and a phonecall to the engineer of the electrical company here ( who also didn't understand ) I just gave up and pointed my finger at the 2 wires and said "just connect these 2 and then you're done". And this was all about the 3rd wire (neutral) in the outlets going to my copper ground rod. And I know virtually nothing about electric, everything that starts with "elec" were my worst subjects in school !

Just saying they can use a lot more than the few occupations listed above...

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Posted

 

 

or they are not qualified or they are OFWs or all three.

 

This is about the truth, most CE's go abroad, then come back and build houses Badly in many cases.

seems a little like the criminologist course, every one does them then No work :rolleyes: 

 

JP :tiphat: 

Morning All :morning1:

This is what they call the Philippine Brain Drain... Many Filipinos who get their degree often are lured outside the country for work. It's hard to argue with that higher pay cheque!

Well. Many of the OFW would STAY close to their family, if they would get work in Phils, even if the paycheck would be rather much lower than for OFW.  (Agencies take big part of OFW paychecks anyway).   BUT many university/college EXAMED Filpinos DON'T GET ANY work. (I mean jobs with at least the "minimum" salary the law say, but many employers don't follow.)

E g I know three Filipinas with exams within computing. They had to become nannies/domestic helpers abroad. One of them has a small son, who she miss much, so she would sure stay at home, if she would get a full time paid job there. (=In Surigao Sur.  The other two are from Bohol.)

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Posted

Move along folks,,,nothing new to see here :tiphat:  :lol:  :hystery: . move along :;

 

Seriously the OFW phenomenon has been going on for millennia (thank you Europe and Asia for making the good ole USA what it is today)

 

But if we really look at the so called OFW/brain drain problem I believe we will see it has two layers. Those that have very marketable skills (nurses is naturally the one that comes to mind) that immigrate to the first world countries and have no intention of fulfilling a "contract" and then returning home. These nurses then suck the second wave after them through sponsorship (brothers who are teachers in the Philippines and immigrate to become taxi drivers).

 

The real OFW's are really nothing more that semi-skilled labor with no real marketable skill that the "first world" is looking for as immigrants. You might or might not be surprised that a good 50% of the civilian labor at the US military bases in Iraq were Filipino (the other major group being Pakistani).

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Posted

I think I will apply for a sanitary engineer position. I have been involved in this industry for 64 years, so have vast

experience. Then again it might be a shi..y job!

If you can stand the smell you got it licked.

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