Uber Now Legal In Da Philippines.....

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The Philippines Just Made Uber Legal Everywhere

 

 

 

THE PHILIPPINES HAS just become the first country to develop nationwide ride-hailing regulations, making it legal for app-based transportation services like Uber operate anywhere in the nation.

In a statement posted online today, the country’s transportation department announced that it would publish more details this week. The move comes just a little over a year after Uber launched its service in the nation’s capital, Metro Manila, and after months of operating in the Philippines without formal regulations.

The new rules are a triumph for Uber, which is still facing regulatory resistance all over the world.
“We view technological innovation as a driver for progress, especially in transportation where it can provide safer and more convenient commuting options to the public,” Jun Abaya, the Philippines’ Department of Transportation and Communications secretary, said. “App-based transport services help address the increasing demand for mobility spurred by rapid urbanization.”

All the specifics of the regulations have yet to be finalized, but in general, the DOTC says cars that operate on these services must have a GPS system; must be sedans, Asian Utility Vehicles (AUVs), SUVs, or vans; and can’t be more than seven years old. Operators will also be required to obtain certificates for each vehicle on the service, and drivers must be screened and accredited by Uber (or other ride-hailing services) and registered with the local transportation regulatory board.

A Triumph for Uber
The new rules are a triumph for Uber, which is still facing regulatory resistance all over the world. In India, Uber’s largest market outside of the US by number of cities covered, allegations late last year that an Uber driver raped a female passenger sparked an impassioned conversation about passenger safety that pushed the company to introduce new security features. Just last week, Uber ceased operations in Kansas because a new bill, which imposed stricter insurance and driver screening requirements, made it much tougher for the ride-hailing service to operate in the state. In the Philippines, where local governments don’t hold as much sway as the national government, it’s much easier for Uber to get sweeping regulations approval.

But Uber still faces challenges unique to the Phillipines. For one, Uber’s routing algorithm doesn’t work as well in Manila, which has some of the world’s worst traffic. And as one writer in the Phillipines points out, Uber has been operating in the country a bit like a condo rental service; operators are buying small fleets of brand new cars and hiring individual drivers—essentially layering a new middleman on top of Uber itself. As the incentives Uber has put into place to spur growth are being phased out, drivers’ salaries are apparently taking a hit so that these fleet owners can break even.

Many locals do say that the service is often cheaper and more convenient than local cab services. But Uber drivers, regulators and the company itself still have work to do to find the right fit if Uber expects to keep growing in the Philippines—and the rest of the world.

 

 

 

 

http://www.wired.com/2015/05/uber-philippines/

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Personally I can't remember the last time I caught a taxi.. Been using Uber here in Australia for nearly 12 months. 

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I would be very curious how it will go here in Manila. I can see it in the business districts for short hauls. I am not clear how it works Brett? Do you input and you get a response back on how long it will take a taxi to get to your location? Of do you input and just wait.

 

If I say, am here in Paranaque, (southern metro) and need a ride to the airport, I would be afraid of the drivers saying "its to much of a pain to get there for a relatively short fare" and I would be left stranded.

 

But like I said, I can see this working in Makati, BGC, Ayala Alabang and places like that.

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I would prefer a regular licensed, metered taxi, with (hopefully) an experienced professional driver who knows the city, not a shoe salesman using his car to make extra money

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It all works from a smart phone app.  You link your bank details to your Uber account so no cash ever changes hands and there is never any quibbling over the fare.

 

You open the app, a map comes up and shows you were the nearest active drivers are.  You hit a button and let the app know how many people and where you are travelling.  The fare is then set based on the fastest route so unless the driver particulary enjoys the pleasure of your company there's no point in them taking you the "scenic" route. Wait times, just like traditional cabs, can vary but I've never been left for more than 10 minutes even on a busy Saturday night whereas you can wait up to an hour with a cab. 

 

The beauty of the system here in Australia is that drivers only pay 20% of their fare to Uber, unlike traditional cabs where it's 50% if they don't own the car (cabs here are individually owned and operate as co-operatives, owners pay up to $500K AUD for their plates and normally employ drivers - it's a mobile small business).   I've found generally speaking the cost of any trip with Uber is anwhere from about 25-40% cheaper depending on the length of the trip. 

 

The other great aspect of the system is that at the end of your trip, both the passenger and the diver rate each other.  So if you play up or carry on for whatever reason whilst being in the vehicle, you'll get one star (out of 5) and probably never be picked up again and the same applies for the driver based on service, cleanliness, presentation and overall dememour so it's in their interest to be on the ball in every aspect as well or they'll be dropped from the program.   

 

I have friends that are driving for Uber now, they love it.  Making good money and most of their costs are tax write-offs.  They're paid weekly and on time.  You work when you want so it's become huge amongst students paying their own way.  The company provided all the technology they required (hardware such as their Uber jobby/gps etc) for nothing.  They even had to go through comprehensive police background checks; here in Australia, traditional cab drivers don't have to other than driving record.  All you need is at least a 4 door car no more than 5 years old in good condition (yes they do go and inspect the vehicle prior to aproval with the company). 

 

All in all a win/win situation for everyone except for the traditional taxi companies that have been gouging us and being outright rude for years. 


I would prefer a regular licensed, metered taxi, with (hopefully) an experienced professional driver who knows the city, not a shoe salesman using his car to make extra money

 

 

See the post I just made ;)

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That all seems very good, I can understand it working in Australia. Although when I lived in East Victoria Park, before I bought a car, I found the transit system awesome, Here in Manila / Makati taxis are so cheap, it is hard to imagine paying even 20% less. I pay  $160 peso ( $4.50 canadian) to ride from the airport to my condo in Makati, a ride that takes anywhere from 25 min to 45 min depending on traffic 

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Interesting concept Brett, as you know in Oz it would be great as taxis are rip offs, as stated in Phils, maybe

notso good as fares are quite reasonable, but every saving is worth it.

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Like so many things, it will be interesting to see how it translates to PH.

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That all seems very good, I can understand it working in Australia. Although when I lived in East Victoria Park, before I bought a car, I found the transit system awesome, Here in Manila / Makati taxis are so cheap, it is hard to imagine paying even 20% less. I pay  $160 peso ( $4.50 canadian) to ride from the airport to my condo in Makati, a ride that takes anywhere from 25 min to 45 min depending on traffic 

That is about a third of the price you would pay from Mactan airport to Cebu city.

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You link your bank details to your Uber account so no cash ever changes hands and there is never any quibbling over the fare.  

 

Not sure I would want anyone having my bank details other than those that need it to pay me.All to many times I have had fraudulent (For want of a better word) transactions, The last being SKYPE doing a Telephone Top up that I did not action and have not used Skype for over 3 years. I might add.

 

Nah! for me pay cash and haggle the price before getting in the taxis, in Manila taxis are 10 a penny. Plenty to choose from.

 

Question, Does anyone here use this transport enough, to warrant giving Bank Details?

 

JMT

 

JP :rolleyes:  

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