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Revealed: The country with the highest proportion of British deaths is the Philippines... and it can cost £17,000 to repatriate a body

  • Over 4000 deaths occur abroad for British travellers according to FCO stats
  • Spain has the most deaths, but also the most British visitors and residents 
  • Funeral directors Rowland Brothers International say repatriation can cost up to £17,000, if the body is as far away as China and South America

 

It has never been easier to explore the world and leave behind Britain in pursuit of new experiences and adventure. 
But sadly not all trips go to plan, with more than 4,000 deaths among British travellers annually, according to figures from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).
And while Spain sees the highest number of deaths, when looked at proportionally it is the Philippines which is the deadliest country for British travellers. 


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As a proportion, British nationals remain significantly more likely to die in the Philippines than in any other country. This is due to the large number of elderly British expats who live there

THE TOP 20 COUNTRIES FOR TRAVELLER DEATHS 

Spain - 856
USA - 125
Thailand - 362
France - 346
Greece - 160
United Arab Emirates - 75
Cyprus - 157
Australia - 72
India - 89
Germany - 146 
Turkey - 75
China - 66
Philippines - 82 
Pakistan - 21
Portugal - 131
Egypt - 49
Canada - 32
Switzerland - 173 
Italy - 45
Jamaica - 23 
Source: FCO 


In 2013-2014, 856 of the 4,110 deaths of British citizens happened in Spain.
But proportionally, compared to the number who travel, British nationals are most likely to be die in the Philippines, which is due to the high number of elderly expats, with 82 cases during that period.
And if the worst should happen, the cost of bringing a body back from a foreign country can reach a small fortune. 
According to funeral directors Rowland Brothers International, repatriation can cost up to £17,000, if the body is as far away as China, South America and Japan and it can often be cheaper to bury or cremate abroad. 
The second most common place to die after Spain is Thailand, which saw 362 deaths and France with 346, although both countries saw a reduction from 2012-2013 numbers. 
The actual number is thought to be even higher than this, due to the consulate omitting recording death notifications as consulate cases where they had no other involvement. 
Steve Rowland of Rowland Brothers said: 'It might be possible to pay as much as £7,000 to bring someone back from Spain, but we would hope to do it for under £3,500.'
A spokesperson from the funeral directors said: 'We are frequently appointed by travel insurance and assistance companies to help families in this sad situation. 
'If there is a tragedy away from home, we always hope that travel insurance is in place, but if there is none, or if cover is declined, we work with families privately to bring their loved one home.'
According to statistics released by Saga, the average repatriation claim is for £3,800 and for cremation the average claim is £1,700.


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The country with the highest number of deaths of British nationals recorded was Spain (856 cases), followed by Thailand (362) and France (346)

Sadly there are still situations where people have been caught smuggling dead bodies on planes to avoid this.
In 2010, a mum and daughter were arrested allegedly trying to transport a dead relative on to a busy holiday jet. 
WHAT TO DO IF A LOVED ONE DIES ABROAD

If you are living in the UK and a relative or friend dies when abroad, you should contact the FCO on 0207 0081500.
If you are abroad, you should contact the relevant Embassy, High Commission or Consulate. 
It is essential that the death is registered in the country where the person died. The FCO can advise you how to do this. 
The FCO can also advise you about bringing a body and personal belongings back to the UK and provide support during this distressing time. 


Staff grew suspicious at the unresponsive 91-year-old Kurt "Willi" Jarant, but the females said that he was simply sleeping. 
The wife, and step-daughter claimed the Alzheimer's sufferer was alive when they arrived at Liverpool's John Lennon airport to catch an easyJet flight to Berlin. 
Not only did the FCO report a 34 per cent reduction in the amount of deaths abroad from the previous year, but there were also less reported cases of rape, sexual assault and hospitalisation.
Spain once again topped the list as a country with the most hospitalisation with 675 cases, but the number has reduced significantly compared to last year, with a 24 per cent decrease.
The second highest country for hospitalisation was Greece with 320 incidents, followed by Thailand with 267. 
Interestingly, a fall in ski-related incidents it thought to attribute to the reduction in hospitalisation cases in France which reduced by 26 per cent to 156 cases.


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There are large amounts of accidents and deaths reported in Mexico, with 900 reports of death caused by vehicular accidents from October 2002 to December 2014

Although the FCO did not have information on the breakdown of cause of death, the top ten causes of death for Americans were listed on State Department Data. 
The most common cause of death for American tourists was vehicular accidents, with 3,004 cases occurring from October 2002 to December 2014. 
The country which had the most vehicular accidents was Mexico with 900 reports of death.
The second most frequent cause of death was homicide with 1,913 cases, again with Mexico topping the list with 670 incidents. 
Suicide (1,383 cases) and accidents such as hiking and rafting (1,251) attributed to the third and fourth most common causes of death. 
With drowning (1,244 reports) being most prevalent again in Mexico with 283 incidents. 
 
 
WHAT THE FCO DOES IF SOMEONE DIES ABROAD

  • When the FCO is told about an incident involving a British national abroad, it will try to contact the person’s family as soon as possible.
  • If the person who died was travelling with a tour company, the company will often contact the next of kin, themselves.
  • If the death of a British national abroad is reported, it will ask the UK police to tell UK-based next of kin as soon as possible. 
  • If next of kin are not in the UK, consular staff in the country where they are will deliver the news.
  • Consular staff in London can pass on wishes about dealing with the body to staff overseas.
  • Post-mortem examinations may be carried out by the local authorities without permission.
  • All deaths must be registered with the local authorities in the country where the person died. The FCO offers advice on how to do this.
  • Documents of the person who died will be needed, showing full name, date of birth and passport number.
  • A local death certificate will be needed for use in the UK for most purposes including probate.  

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The second most frequent cause of death for American tourists was homicide with 1,913 cases worldwide, again with Mexico topping the list with 670 incidents

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3086453/The-country-highest-proportion-British-deaths-Philippines-cost-17-000-repatriate-body.html#ixzz3awDemztl 

Edited by Jollygoodfellow
removed excess content and links
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Posted

Interesting but hey i am dead so am i bovered , 

If the Philippines is going to be my home in the future well that is where i will be buried or burnt too, just my own thoughts

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Interesting but hey i am dead so am i bovered , 

If the Philippines is going to be my home in the future well that is where i will be buried or burnt too, just my own thoughts

My line of thought is the same.Some people want to bring dead relatives home so they will have to get the money from somewhere if there is no insurance.

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Posted

Once you check out, what does it matter where you are????

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Posted

Once you check out, what does it matter where you are????

It doesn`t matter to me but some relatives may have different views.

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Posted

 

Once you check out, what does it matter where you are????

It doesn`t matter to me but some relatives may have different views.

Thats right but if they know your plans for your body , they should all be happy for you,

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Posted

Cremation is the obvious solution, although someone has to have the authority to have it carried out.

The said person, then has the responsibilty of transporting the remains back to uk, if that is the request of the family.

Strangely enought my daughter asked me recently, where would I like to be laid to rest! :no:

I said anywhere you like but not to soon!

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Posted

I am here in the Philippines with no intention of ever going back to the UK !

we have already bought and paid for our burial plots here alongside members of the wifes family

of which I am considered to be part of.

when I pass on I wont know where I will be anyway !! 

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Once you check out, what does it matter where you are????

Even before I decided to live in the Philippines I decided after I leave this world I wanted to be burnt and my ashes dumped into the ocean/sea.  This way anyone who wants to visit my resting place can always find a beach somewhere.  This even makes more since for my family if my end happens while living in the Philippines.  No since wasting money flying me elseware.  Didn't really like flying too much while alive.  Of course if transporting me home is someone's wish, at least I'd me more comfortable laying down for the long flight with plenty of room! :hystery:

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