Pig Breeding And Raising. The Definitive.

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chris49
Posted
Posted

Clear the air first.  Have had word with Thomas on the subject, and we either disagree or have a communication, perhaps language gap.

 

Interesting subject living in the province. We have 4 going at the moment. There is an American close to here running 80-90 head for rearing and sale. They have 5 mother pigs, so a big operation. I have a visit over there tomorrow so will know more.

 

We have land, we have built a pen, we have labor. But the hard numbers are not yet 100% clear.

 

Thomas and someone else has mentioned a sell points of 60 kg.  That would get you about 7000 in today's market. That's against a 5-6 month old hog which could bring you double, 120 kg @ 120=14, 400, let's say 14, 000.

 

So lets have the hard numbers and don't let me confuse the picture by quoting more.

 

A 45 day old piglet if healthy and growing normally will cost 3000-3200.

 

Home breeds are free. You either raise or sell, with 45 days being the sell point.

 

Pig food is 1560 a bag or 1500 depends on the terms.

 

Corn is an additive. Currently 13 pesos/kg plus a small milling fee for grinding.

 

Rice husks are 2 pesos per kg per 50 kg bag. They can also be mixed in.

 

So let's have the hard numbers. We are on it at the moment, looking to expand.

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Dave Hounddriver
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From the consumer point of view:

 

Those of us who could care less about whether the farmer/breeder is making money are more interested in what we have to pay when we go to a Lechon supplier.  These suppliers are regular folk who live in the populated areas, roast the pigs, and sell the finished product.

 

We walked by one of these vendors yesterday.  He showed us some live pigs and some finished product.  The smallest pig he would sell was only 20kg and it would cost me 4,500 pesos roast and delivered to my door.  Larger lechons were selling for 5,000 to 6,000 pesos.  So the farmer selling his pig for lechon is going to do best when the pig is only 20 to 30 kg.  This is in Dumaguete area and to show how the price of Lechon has gone up, I bought a 20kg lechon in Cebu in 2008 for only 3,500.

 

Pork chops in the store are a different matter and I suspect the size and price of pig used for pork meat is much different   So long as the cost of pork chops stays reasonable then I am happy for the farmer to make money.  Best of luck to ya.

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scott h
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I am coming down with Dave on this one. Bargain hunting is as ingrained in the Filipino psychic as eating gobs of rice every meal is. For example the buy 1 take 1, or if you go into a jewelry store, look at a piece ask the price and the response is "XXX pesos less 20% sir" with out even asking for a break lol.

 

I think the real debate is going to start after your visit to the neighboring farmer (which I am very interested to hear about). If I may, I suggest you ask about the hidden costs, those we don't think about. Like:

 

1. Veterinary costs (if any) (we are on a "all creatures great and small" CD kick right now :mocking: )

2. Any extra electricity needed? (I can't see any but throw it against the wall and see if it sticks)

3. Security at night? You never know pig rustling is big I hear heh heh.

4. Water costs?

5. Salt licks? I don't know all my time was spent on cattle ranches.

6. Extra soap? I know my brother raised a couple of pigs for 4H, and he always came into the house stinking to high heaven and mom made him bath immediately :thumbsup: .

 

Bottom line is, I would really pick this guys brain. Like most things out there is isn't the obvious things that trip a guy up, its the little chit that no one thought of.

 

Really looking forward to what he has to say. :cheersty:

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chris49
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Will definitely get back to you. Meanwhile.

 

1, Vets Costs: unavoidable as they seem to do a round here, in this case injecting vitamins. another visit giving antibiotic injections after maybe a bacterial infection. Who knows, it cost a few hundred, but hard to argue with the family so let it go.

 

2. Electricity: no, we could run a line over there but have not thought about it.

 

3. Security: at this stage not a problem. If it is it's going to be internal, maybe someone here looking to settle debts and sweet talking GIna, 90% no. 10%, they have there way, better be alert. Leaving the property for a longer period, we would not do that.

 

4. Water: yes we have another pump but we haven't installed it yet. The mayor gave one to every household after she was elected, we got 2. The first pump is 30 metres walk, so we should have one next to the pen. Lovely sweet water here from underground and the Govt irrigation canal out back. All free, we do need to install the pump.

 

5. Salt licks: good point. I mix in some local salt into there drinking water AM. LIke a rehydration fluid, they really go for it too. Licking the pail when the water is gone.

 

6. Soap: No. It's is not "hands on", we have buckets, brushes on long handles, have not needed to get in the pen yet. Water runs out the back and we have a pumpkin patch there.

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chris49
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Dave the lechon business is done differently here. There is no vendor doing orders in this area. The system is to get a pig and contact the people, home based, who can cook the lechon. Not sure how much it costs or if the price is nudged up on a small piglet.

 

I talked to Gina and the way I would do it is to buy a piglet and decide when to send it to the cooking specialists.

 

Dam, haven't had one for a while. Sounds amazing.

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scott h
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Oh ya,,,one other thing, Bowling balls. You'll need lots of bowling balls. My brothers pigs were given a bowling ball which they rolled around their pen like two very ungraceful soccer players. And make sure you have no swimming pools in the area, his pigs once escaped and ended up in a neighbors pool. Needless to say our family was uninvited to the 4th of July pool party :hystery: .

 

When you visit tomorrow brother, keep your head on a swivel, if you spy anything that is the least bit unrecognizable ask "what the hell is that thing?" then "is it used for the pigs?" and "how much it cost?"

 

This could be fun, setting up a piggery in absentia :tiphat: . :dance:

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Thomas
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We walked by one of these vendors yesterday. He showed us some live pigs and some finished product. The smallest pig he would sell was only 20kg and it would cost me 4,500 pesos roast and delivered to my door. Larger lechons were selling for 5,000 to 6,000 pesos. So the farmer selling his pig for lechon is going to do best when the pig is only 20 to 30 kg.
  I don't know the English expression for small pigs meet, but people can be interested in paying more per kilo for small pigs, because they taste better.  
Have had word with Thomas on the subject, and we either disagree or have a communication, perhaps language gap.
Well. Numbers are SAME in different languages  :)   but we talked about piglets with a bit DIFFERENT AGE at START of the breeding.  Perhaps there are regional differences. And perhaps we talk about different pig races too.  Sure there are different best weights for selling for different races.  I heared 60 kg is best in economical point of view for the race which is common in Central Visayas. (That's MUCH different from the "Swedish" pigs which I believe they START breeding away from their mother close to that weight  :lol:

 

Here is the values I got from rural Cebu island for TWO:

Piglets 2 x 2000   so obviosly they were younger than them Chris start with.  Younger are MORE RISKY, because they have less developed imune system, but it's better profit IF the breeder is lucky they don't get ill,

which they were in this case so NO MEDICAL cost in THIS case.

Feed TOTAL 5000

Transport to get them  200     No transport cost to sell them, because they were sold to a neighbour.

Sold for 17 000p after 4 months (Sold in middle of March 2015).

= 9200 > 17 000 in 4 months with some luck.

 

The family is builders so the pig "house" they made of some scrap.

6. Soap
In this case her brother breed some other animals, so I suppouse he need soap anyway   :) 
make sure you have no swimming pools in the area, his pigs once escaped and ended up in a neighbors pool.
Biger pig farms have for pigs very SAD contructions normaly, but I saw an IMPRESSING Filipino exception.

/They have built so it's self ventilating by air get in through sides and out throw the roof.

/Movable covers so they can give shade from the sun.

/The walls are cement in BOTTOM part, but higher up it's bamboo fence so the pigs can LOOK OUT at nice sorounding.

/Ribbs in the floor in the "toilet part" covered by something which let pee por through and poo stay at the top, so they mix much less =Much less smell.    Caretakers walk around and pick up the poo with tools, so the toilets are rather clean !

/A part where the pigs can move around the bottom cover.

/More space than normal for each pig. Still some crowded, but MUCH better than most pigs have.

/And a small POOL in each section !   :lol:   :thumbsup:

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Mike In Canada
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In Ilocos Sur piglets are 2500 and the relatives will not sell until they reach a minimum of 100 kilos or they don't make enough money. I believe that takes 3 or 4 months and 3 sacks of feeds at 1400 to 1500 per sack. So the cost with out there labor which they don't pay directly for is about 7000 to selling time. The price fluctuates depending if it is school graduation, Christmas, New Years etc. then they get higher prices per kilo as there is high demand. The sell price I think is about 115 per kilo, therefor the profit is  about 4,500 per pig.

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Mike J
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I think one thing to consider is how thin the profit margins are for the vast majority of any small business here.  You would (probably) be competing with a number of competitors all of whom have experience raising pigs.  These folks are Filipino and know how to keep costs at rock bottom.  Supply and demand here for food products of any kind seems to keep profit margins at a very low level.  There can also be a tendency for a family subsidized business to "eat" up the profit when a birthday, holiday, funeral, or festival comes around and serving lechon baboy elevates the self esteem of the family.  

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Gratefuled
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My brother-in-law has a farm but every once in a while he buys a small piglet and raises it. Then, when it matures, he has it butchered and cooked. He then takes it to the local church and sells the lechon and takes home the rest. I don't know if it's worth the trouble but I don't eat lechon so I don't really care.

I do enjoy chicharrones and  adobo

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