It's Not Just A Job, It's And Adventure!

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I was asked by a VERY prominent member of this forum to tell more about the things I did in the US Navy. I will not bore you with my entire career, but I will tell you about one incident. Because this is when it became "Not just a job, but an adventure"

 

In 1989 I had the distinct honor of being a plankowner and member of the commisioning crew of the guided missile cruiser USS Princeton CG-59. In Dec 1990 we were deployed to the Persain Gulf as a member of the USS Ranger CV-61 Battle Group in support of Operation Desert Storm. In Feb we were detached and ordered to the Northern Persian Gulf to provide Air Defense coverage for the 10,000 sailors and marines of the USS Peleliu's Amphibious Landing Group.

 

The folowing is an exerpt from Wikipedia (with my comments in italics)

 

On the morning of 18 February 1991, during Operation Desert Storm, Princeton was patrolling 28 nautical miles (52 km) off Failaka Island in the Persian Gulf (we were a F*** of alot closer than that, trust me), on the west side of the decoy U.S. Marine and naval invasion forces afloat.(we were their Air Defense protection) At exactly 7:15 AM local time two Italian-made MN103 Manta bottom-mounted influence mines detonated, one just under the port rudder and the other just forward of the starboard bow, the second explosion most likely being a sympathetic explosion caused by the first. The blasts cracked the superstructure, buckled three lines in the hull, jammed the port rudder, flooded the #3 switchboard room through chilled water pipe cracks, and damaged the starboard propeller shaft. BM3 Ford was seriously injured (he was manning the 50Cal on the forecastle along side the mine watch. Launched him into the air like a springboard. He came down on his head on the port side turnbuckles), along with two other crewmembers who sustained various injuries (one was the GSE3 in the #3 switchboard room. The other was a GM2 who happened to be in MT52 at the time). Despite the severe damage, the forward weapons and the AEGIS combat system were back online within 15 minutes. (Had this occured 15 or 20 minutes later it would have been a disaster because the entire Combat Systems Dept whould have been at quarters on the fantail. As it was most of the crew was on the mess decks eating breakfast. I myself had just got off the midwatch and was in my rack.)

 

At great peril, the Canadian warship HMCS Athabaskan (Canucks to the rescue!) moved north through the minefield to deliver damage-control supplies to the severely damaged Princeton, which remained on station for 30 hours until she was relieved.( at General Quarters the entire 30 hours as well. Still providing Air Defense coverage for the marines) The crippled ship, with a locked starboard propeller shaft and a locked port rudder, was guided from the minefield by the minesweeper USS Adroit.(She ran out of flares marking all the mines and started using chem lights. We were towed out by an ocean going Fleet Tug that followed the minesweep in.) Temporary repairs were conducted first in Bahrain, and then in the port of Jebel Ali near Dubai by the duty destroyer tender USS Acadia,(We were guarded by the Brits with machine guns. No-nonsense blokes with orders to shoot first, ask questions later) and finally in a Dubai drydock. After eight weeks, the Princeton returned to the United States under the ship's own power for additional repairs. The ship and her crew were awarded the Combat Action Ribbon.

 

I served 5yrs 2mths 10days 14hrs and 10min aboard USS Princeton (but who was counting?) with one of the finest crews that I have ever had the honor and priviledge to have served with.

 

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Posted

I was asked by a VERY prominent member of this forum to tell more about the things I did in the US Navy. I will not bore you with my entire career, but I will tell you about one incident. Because this is when it became "Not just a job, but an adventure"

 

I served 5yrs 2mths 10days 14hrs and 10min aboard USS Princeton (but who was counting?) with one of the finest crews that I have ever had the honor and priviledge to have served with.

 

Damn, I love these modern day war stories!  Master Chief Henk was the head MoFo of CIC (combat information center) shown below:

      post-686-0-13297800-1446784497_thumb.jpg

 

All the radar scopes/display, weapons consoles, satcom, sonar gear and electronic warfare are under his direct supervision and training.  And on top of that, Ron was a plank owner of a brand new Ticonderoga class missile cruiser.  A bad ass warship that often times serves as the flagship of a battle group commander.

      post-686-0-91011800-1446786741_thumb.png USS PRINCETON CG-59

 

I hope your shipmates god speed and all ahead flank!  Thank you for sharing your adventures in the Persian Gulf during Desert Storm.  That minefield also forced me to have more pucker power in pinching my butt cheeks......he, he.

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I was there in Riyadh 1991 as a civilian.

 

We had 2 scud missiles shot down over Riyadh and one landed on the outskirts of the city, 3 killed.

 

The main problem we faced was the reverberating boom and broken windows. So we were told to tape them up with masking tape. We went to work as normal and although we did not feel any present danger there was a tension for a 6-8 weeks period. Children asked to sleep on the floor and we got issued with some rudimentary gas masks. We did not have International News at the time, but very quickly they allowed us CNN, BBC and Al Jazeera to to cut down on panic via rumors.

 

I looked out a double glass door and saw a flash in the sky. I called my wife but before she could answer me, like 3 seconds later, I was thrown backwards because I had my 2 hands on the glass. Then I knew we were close to trouble.

 

A Scud missile had been tracked and intercepted by a US Patriot Missile resulting in the flash in the sky.  The picture made Newsweek and a lady professional photographer made what we heard was $175, 000 framing and selling the copies. I had one but it is not with me now.

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I was there in Riyadh 1991 as a civilian.

 

We had 2 scud missiles shot down over Riyadh and one landed on the outskirts of the city, 3 killed.

 

The main problem we faced was the reverberating boom and broken windows. So we were told to tape them up with masking tape. We went to work as normal and although we did not feel any present danger there was a tension for a 6-8 weeks period. Children asked to sleep on the floor and we got issued with some rudimentary gas masks. We did not have International News at the time, but very quickly they allowed us CNN, BBC and Al Jazeera to to cut down on panic via rumors.

 

I looked out a double glass door and saw a flash in the sky. I called my wife but before she could answer me, like 3 seconds later, I was thrown backwards because I had my 2 hands on the glass. Then I knew we were close to trouble.

 

A Scud missile had been tracked and intercepted by a US Patriot Missile resulting in the flash in the sky.  The picture made Newsweek and a lady professional photographer made what we heard was $175, 000 framing and selling the copies. I had one but it is not with me now.

 

I remember that. We were in Bahrain by that time getting initial repairs. I remember the warning sirens going of everywhere. Because them damn scuds, you could never tell where the heck they were going to land. Not even the people that launched them had a clew.

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I was there in Riyadh 1991 as a civilian.

 

We had 2 scud missiles shot down over Riyadh and one landed on the outskirts of the city, 3 killed.

 

The main problem we faced was the reverberating boom and broken windows. So we were told to tape them up with masking tape. We went to work as normal and although we did not feel any present danger there was a tension for a 6-8 weeks period. Children asked to sleep on the floor and we got issued with some rudimentary gas masks. We did not have International News at the time, but very quickly they allowed us CNN, BBC and Al Jazeera to to cut down on panic via rumors.

 

I looked out a double glass door and saw a flash in the sky. I called my wife but before she could answer me, like 3 seconds later, I was thrown backwards because I had my 2 hands on the glass. Then I knew we were close to trouble.

 

A Scud missile had been tracked and intercepted by a US Patriot Missile resulting in the flash in the sky.  The picture made Newsweek and a lady professional photographer made what we heard was $175, 000 framing and selling the copies. I had one but it is not with me now.

 

I remember that. We were in Bahrain by that time getting initial repairs. I remember the warning sirens going of everywhere. Because them damn scuds, you could never tell where the heck they were going to land. Not even the people that launched them had a clew.

 

The SCUD was just about as useless (But as Destructive) as the the V1 (The Duddlebug) in WW2 it was indiscriminate, Murderous and says it all about the ME and any Form of Humanity. As an Ex Military man it sickens me to think that Civilian Targets are just that, a Target. Damn them all but as we know Dirty war is and easy war.

That's me Folks.

 

Jack :unsure:

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