Jeepneys, How Do They Work?

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Posted

Simple question, I've been there many times, caught multiple trikes, taxis etc but I've only been in one or 2 jeepneys and that was with someone that was guided me after a few too many Red Horses or Tuandays.  

 

For example, I'm at Ayala in Cebu, I want to get to La Vie Parisienne in Lahug.  How do I know how much to pay and how do I know which one to be on?

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Posted
 But if you have to pay the conductor then just give him 10 pesos or give him a 20 and ask for change, or just give him the 20 and act bored so he thinks you know what you are doing and then he will give you back the change.

 

Hahahah so true of life there in general!

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Posted

Should cost 7.50 pesos for the whole line journey no matter if you go 100 meters or to the end of the line. Just get on & if your not close to the driver say "bayad" (fare) and hand the money to someone closer to the driver and they will pass the money up, if you have given him more than the fare he will prepare your change and hand it back. Do remember to carry loose coins or 20 peso bills as they aren't too impressed by people giving them 100's and so on

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Posted

True here in America, for another reason. It's a great day when you actually get your change back, instead of being coerced into a "tip"

 

 But if you have to pay the conductor then just give him 10 pesos or give him a 20 and ask for change, or just give him the 20 and act bored so he thinks you know what you are doing and then he will give you back the change.

 

Hahahah so true of life there in general!

 

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Posted (edited)

It's good to do is practice walking a tightrope in a hunched over position. :th_hu: . When you can do this easily, well..when you board a crowded jeepney, you'll know what I mean (I'm sure you do---). :cheersty:

max occupancy is one more...

Edited by Hey Steve
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Posted

The fare goes up a bit x 2 pesos as the trip gets longer.

 

It is absolutely necessary to state politely your destination.  eg, state the name of the landmark or cross street you want to go......Lacson po...means stop at Lacson Street and tells him how much he's going to charge you.

 

Don't converse with the other passengers and avoid body contact, it is considered rude like an invasion of privacy.

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Posted

We were in Angeles City 2 years ago and the jeepney fair was 8 pesos. Whenever I rode one by myself, I always asked the driver where he was going to make sure it was my destination. I always tried to carry some 10 peso coins with me to pay for the ride.  When the driver tried to give me change I would tell him to keep it.  Not much of a tip but I always got to where I wanted to go and the driver was always helpful in getting me there.

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Posted

I visited Cebu recently an did not like the jeepney setup.  They all had route numbers instead of the usual mass of destinations written on the windshield.  They were numbered like '6b', which meant nothing to me.  I like what most other cities have - just a list of destination written on the windshield.  That way I can just look for a jeepney that says "ayala", or "sm city" , and you know about where you are going...

 

In Iloilo the base jeepney fare was lowered from p7.5 to p7 last year.  It does go up depending on how far you are going.  The ones that circle around inside Iloilo proper are just p7.  To get to my house it is p16.

 

 

No guarantee what language these are... or the spelling... but they work in Iloilo  :)

Bayad palihog - fee please

sa lugar - this place... kind of means stop here

sa lugar sa babow - not sure of actual translation, but stop where you can.  As opposed to stop now...

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Posted

Simple question, I've been there many times, caught multiple trikes, taxis etc but I've only been in one or 2 jeepneys and that was with someone that was guided me after a few too many Red Horses or Tuandays.  

 

For example, I'm at Ayala in Cebu, I want to get to La Vie Parisienne in Lahug.  How do I know how much to pay and how do I know which one to be on?

I would like to add some more tidbits of information.  Often times you can readily see their routes painted on the side, some are even color coded (like in Olongapo) for certain routes.  More tagalog instructions: para po (stop sir), sa canto po (at the corner sir) or a sharp rap on the ceiling to signal him to stop.  Speaking of stopping, sometimes the driver will, all of the sudden stop and take a leak at his front left wheel.  Also don't be alarmed he's still smoking a cigarette while pumping diesel (usual near his seat or underneath it).

 

If you're lucky enough to sit at the front, you will be amaze how they can drive, collect money, give proper change while navigating through traffic like a rape ape.  By the way, they love having a beautiful Pinay sitting next to them.

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