Plane Door Opens After Leaving Cebu

Recommended Posts

Posted

Hey bud, did you lock the door on that plane  :unsure:  Um I thought you did  :no:

 

South Korean airliner forced to land after open door discovered
 
 
A South Korean flight bound for home was forced to return to the Philippines after staff noticed that a door on the craft wasn't closed properly.
 
Luckily the potentially catastrophic oversight was noticed by staff about half an hour into the flight, at which point the Jin Air Boeing B737, which was carrying 163 passengers, headed back to Mactan Cebu International.
 
A quick-thinking passenger managed to capture footage of the unsealed exit from inside the craft, through which thin air can be heard whistling; several, passengers complained of head and ear aches, as well as nausea, after the plane safely touched down.
 
The mishap delayed the passengers' arrival in Busan, a port city in the country's southeast about 4.5 hours away by air, by around 15 hours.
 
Generously, Jin Air doled out $118.20 to each passenger as compensation for almost sending them plunging to a terrifying death from 3000m above sea level.
 
South Korea's Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport said it would conduct safety audits of the country's six low-cost carriers; according to Korea Joongang Daily, the door seemed to be working properly when staff had a second at go at closing it.
 
 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted

Lucky they caught it or an embarrassing story could have been a deadly news item.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted (edited)

It's a new aircraft something was very wrong and not with just the door.

There are several sensors (manual and electrical) that would alert the crew in the event a door were not closed correctly. Keep in mind the door would not open in flight at altitude it is impossible for a human to do so unless the cabin were to lose pressurization.  Lucky the aircraft was under 10,000 feet when they turned back

.

Edited by Old55
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

It's a new aircraft something was very wrong and not with just the door.

There are several sensors (manual and electrical) that would alert the crew in the event a door were not closed correctly. Keep in mind the door would not open in flight at altitude it is impossible for a human to do so unless the cabin were to lose pressurization.  Lucky the aircraft was under 10,000 feet when they turned back

.

 Agree with you here but will add that to me, this is also Human Error of the  Cabin Crew, Have we not all heard that last Pre-flight Check on the Tanoy from the 1st Officer, " Doors Locked and cross checked. Not done methinks. :no:

 

Jack :thumbsup:

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted
Luckily the potentially catastrophic oversight was noticed by staff about half an hour into the flight,
Lucky the aircraft was under 10,000 feet when they turned back

 

Thats what got me puzzled.  Any plane I have been on reaches cruising altitude within the first half hour.  I would suspect it was at 30,000 feet by that time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted
Nervous fliers may be interested to know that Qantas has been named the safest airline for the third year running. 

 

According to AirlineRatings.com, which monitors 407 flight companies around the world, Qantas is the safest airline around. It has a fatality-free record in the jet era, which has been described as “extraordinary”. 

 

The top twenty safest airlines include Emirates, American Airlines, Cathay Pacific, United Airlines and Virgin Atlantic.

 

The website rated airlines based on a number of things. It looked at audits run by aviation industry bodies, government reports, each airline’s fatality records, incident reports and company history, as well as how well they are run.  

 

Those on a strict new year’s budget might be more interested in the safest low-cost airlines. They are (in alphabetical order): Aer Lingus, Flybe, HK Express, Jetblue, Jetstar Australia, Thomas Cook, TUI Fly, Virgin America, Volaris and Westjet.

 

The website says that what sets these cheaper airlines apart is that they’ve all passed the International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) - which really sounds like something all airlines should be required to do - and have excellent safety records. 

 

The world’s airlines carried a record 3.6 billion passengers on 34 million flights in 2015. Making up the full top twenty in alphabetical order are: 

 

Air New Zealand, Alaska Airlines, All Nippon Airlines, American Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, Etihad Airways, EVA Air, Finnair, Hawaiian Airlines, Japan Airlines, KLM, Lufthansa, Qantas, Scandinavian Airline System, Singapore Airlines, Swiss, United Airlines, Virgin Atlantic and Virgin Australia.

 

 

From Yahoo news

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted

Dave I suspect "they" may have known (discovered) the door was not sealed soon after takeoff. The aircraft never got to altitude but turned back and landed. The fuselage is a pressure vessel has sensors indicating a seal. I think the crew screwed up. The door latches and cam plates are very hardened I seriously doubt there was a mechanical failure on so new an aircraft.
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted
I think the crew screwed up. The door latches and cam plates are very hardened I seriously doubt there was a mechanical failure on so new an aircraft.
  I agree. I find it very difficult to believe that on a newer aircraft there is not a warning that comes on in the cockpit when the plane backs away from the loading dock when a door is ajar. My car lets me know when a door is not latched properly when I put it in gear hopefully a airplane has similar safety checks!!!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted
Air New Zealand, Alaska Airlines, All Nippon Airlines, American Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, Etihad Airways, EVA Air, Finnair, Hawaiian Airlines, Japan Airlines, KLM, Lufthansa, Qantas, Scandinavian Airline System, Singapore Airlines, Swiss, United Airlines, Virgin Atlantic and Virgin Australia.

 

Malaysian Air did not make the list?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 

I think the crew screwed up. The door latches and cam plates are very hardened I seriously doubt there was a mechanical failure on so new an aircraft.
  I agree. I find it very difficult to believe that on a newer aircraft there is not a warning that comes on in the cockpit when the plane backs away from the loading dock when a door is ajar. My car lets me know when a door is not latched properly when I put it in gear hopefully a airplane has similar safety checks!!!

 

Roger that guys, the crew really screwed up starting with the flight engineer looking at his summary alarm boards. One LED must have been flashing RED, with possible audible alarm associated with it (unless it was muted).  

 

But the human factor will allow ambiguities and confusion, even within a high tech environment.  A case in point -- on my last command, a nuke missile cruiser......we departed our homeport for a 6-9 months WestPac deployment with the reactor door open.  

 

Yeah, my bayag was never the same after that......he, he.   

Edited by Jake
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...