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Cebu schools


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On 07/11/2016 at 1:07 PM, MartyC said:

Thank you all for your helpful feedback. It really is difficult to choose a school without being there . My wife thinks Sacred heart -Ateneo de Cebu in Mandaue may be a good place to start (thanks for the tip Old55 ) and she has an aunt and cousin nearby . I hear so much negative info about public schools but will see for ourselves once we get established there. Our daughter is a straight A 5th grader now  and I am still amazed at how  fast and far she has came from speaking very little English arriving here as a first grader to being in the top 5 students of all her subjects.  I am afraid public school there may be too much for her at first having forgotten nearly all of her native Cebuano language ,but I could be wrong. Thanks again

Virtually everything taught in schools is worthless. Schooling has virtually zero effect on your child's future so you should not worry about it too much. Also, about the only thing worth teaching children is language which they almost entirely learn from peers so you are doing your child a big disservice by enrolling her in an English school. 

Go for the local school, save your money, and she'll be fluent in a new language after a year. A skill she'll carry with her for life. The rest is garbage.

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1 hour ago, johnbarley said:

Virtually everything taught in schools is worthless. Schooling has virtually zero effect on your child's future so you should not worry about it too much. Also, about the only thing worth teaching children is language which they almost entirely learn from peers so you are doing your child a big disservice by enrolling her in an English school. 

Go for the local school, save your money, and she'll be fluent in a new language after a year. A skill she'll carry with her for life. The rest is garbage.

The ability to read write and think critically has value. 

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20 minutes ago, Old55 said:

The ability to read write and think critically has value. 

Reading and writing are a foregone conclusion that anybody with a bit of curiosity and exposure to modern materials will learn on their own easily and quickly. 

Schools have a negative effect, if any, on critical thinking.

I suggest you research the "Unschooling" movement.

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Unschooling is defined less by what its practitioners do and more by what they do not bring into their children’s educational environment. An unschooling parent does not impose a schedule or curriculum onto her child. Rather, she supports the child’s natural drive and hunger to learn with appropriate educational materials, tools, and activities. According to Jennifer James, Director of the National African-American Homeschoolers Alliance (NAAHA), “Families who are considering unschooling should ask themselves if they have enough learning aids in their home, from encyclopedias and bookshelves full of books to a computer and science kits. In order to unschool properly parents need to equip their home with learning tools.”                                    --------      Homeschooling or "unschooling"may be the way to go for some parents ,but I am moving to the Phils for retirement and hopefully ,a less stressful life. Turning my home into a library/lab and becoming a full time tutor is not what I have in mind, I struggle with her 5th grade algebra lol .not to mention the expense of updating learning material and equipment. I prefer to pay someone else to provide the " learning tools" . To each his own . 

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1 hour ago, MartyC said:

their home, from encyclopedias and bookshelves full of books to a computer and science kits. In order to unschool properly parents need to equip their home with learning tools.”                        

 

1 hour ago, MartyC said:

Unschooling is defined less by what its practitioners do and more by what they do not bring into their children’s educational environment. An unschooling parent does not impose a schedule or curriculum onto her child. Rather, she supports the child’s natural drive and hunger to learn with appropriate educational materials, tools, and activities. According to Jennifer James, Director of the National African-American Homeschoolers Alliance (NAAHA), “Families who are considering unschooling should ask themselves if they have enough learning aids in their home, from encyclopedias and bookshelves full of books to a computer and science kits. In order to unschool properly parents need to equip their home with learning tools.”                                    --------      Homeschooling or "unschooling"may be the way to go for some parents ,but I am moving to the Phils for retirement and hopefully ,a less stressful life. Turning my home into a library/lab and becoming a full time tutor is not what I have in mind, I struggle with her 5th grade algebra lol .not to mention the expense of updating learning material and equipment. I prefer to pay someone else to provide the " learning tools" . To each his own . 

The explanation you posted is very poor.

The idea behind unschooling is to let the kids do whatever they wants rather than forcing them to sit in class 8 hours a day for 12 years cramming their head with useless knowledge. Practitioners pretend to homeschool their kids because of state demands but in reality unschoolers do virtually nothing. There is quite a lot of data showing that the effect of education on grade-age children is almost nil.

But if you were to homeschool rather than unschool, the idea that you need elaborate learning tools, etc. is ridiculous. That's another topic. 

However, I'm not suggesting you do do either(unschooling or homeschooling). I'm only saying that spending money on expensive schools is a waste. And if you spend money on an English school it will prevent your child from learning language, which is the one skill best learned in childhood. 

Your child would be far better off if you take that extra 5k/year and put it in the stock market and turn it over to her when she reached 18 or whatever. 

Don't waste your money on schools that teach nothing. Do put your child in an environment where she can effortlessly pick up an extra language.

Edited by johnbarley
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Marty, that is some great information please start a new topic? I think it's worthwhile and interesting.

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No! I was tortured with school so everyone else must be also! Fair is fair after all.:hystery:

Really, I did learn in school. Some of what I learned I have never used but like jumper cables in the car, isn't it better to have and not need than to need and not have? Who knows what career that adolescent is going to grow up to have?

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