Growing Rice #2

Recommended Posts

Posted

Hi All , 

A bit of info about me first I guess  , nothing much to tell though , just ordinary .

Born in the UK ( Norwich ) , immig. to Aussie as a kid , returned to the UK in 1966 , 3 3/4  incredible years through the Hippie Era  :-)  returned to Aussie in 1970 , retired at 66 in 2014 .

How I found my way to Ozamiz is far more complicated  :-) .

I grew up in farming , mostly Sugar Cane , thats how I became interested in Rice . I will add I will never be able to afford a Paddy here , way to expensive , besides I'm to old any way , grinding to a halt ,  :-( . 

Because of the climate here the farmers can grow Rice all year around , 4 crops . 

Now we get back to the issue ,  Rice Growing , In Aussie they grow rice , 1 crop a year but that crop produces as much as 4 crops here in the Philippines ,   WHY  , surely the Agricultural people have clued the   farmers into the  use  the best varieties , methods , and what ever else is required .

Maybe some of the members of the group can help me ?

Thank you for your time . 

Regards Russ

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted
2 hours ago, Russell Clement said:

In Aussie they grow rice , 1 crop a year but that crop produces as much as 4 crops here in the Philippines ,   WHY

I did not know that and its a dang good question.  No answers from me but I'll follow along and see what others have to say.  I'm going to tag .jamesmusslewhite to see if he has any answers.  He studies Philippine farming more than most expats I know.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

The philippines used to be among the worlds top producers but would not change with the times and use new methods/varieties.Now they have to import a lot of their rice.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Forum Support
Posted
1 hour ago, sonjack2847 said:

change with the times

one of the reasons is that after the Marcos reign they started breaking a lot of the large plantations owned by the rich families and distributed it to the folks that lived there as workers. The small land owners did not have the resources to afford the machinery, fertilizers and stuff like that, and the production fell accordingly 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

My wife wondered that a lot of the problem is that there is no crop rotation so the land is becoming less productive and poisoned with fertilizer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

Most people are just clueless here, same with most businesses here. The Department of Agriculture is trying to get them to use hybrid types but most don't want to from what I've read. I think they only make about 50k pesos profit per hecatre per year, should be 100-200k if they know what they're doing.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

Yes a lot has got to do with varieties that they can sell to the local millers once harvested, also fertilizers, pesticides and planting techniques. With overseas workers bringing back new farming technology and with the education of farming children, this has helped to stem the flow of imported rice. Also note: it doesn't matter how much rain, fertilizer or pesticide you put on a crop, atmospheric conditions determine the outcome of a crop to some degree. Water your lawn each day and it will keep it alive, get 10/20 mil of rain and your mowing for weeks.

My wifes farm in the PI's is now up with the best in technology, but the old habits of how Tatay planted is going to take a generation of farmers to die out, just how it is over there. 

Our farm in Oz is the same, water you will keep things alive, rain and the fruit will fill out to a good size.

The PI's remind me of Oz 40 odd years ago with their agriculture techniques, it has taken a generation to change that past practise. I believe the PI's are going through an exciting time of change, not only with their agriculture but also, building, infrastructure, and schooling. 

When I'm trying to explain a change in farming techniques, I always back it up with photos and literature to put my argument forward. The brother in law allows me a small paty to plant as I see fit, he is slowly coming around when we do figures on productivity and expenses against his same size plot.

His children are all Uni graduates and also have a input into the farming now, but it takes time, their Tatay is still boss. :thumbsup:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Hmm thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

Thank you for your comments , I believe you are close to the mark Clermont , so much of the stuff that goes on here is straight out of the 60's  as I remember growing up in Qld, Aussie. 

I wasnt aware the farmers dont use hybrid seed , but I do know , by the time the farmer pays the ( Piper ) there is very little left for himself .

I guess its no business of mine and why should I care but I'm going to pursue this ,,, one never knows it may open avenues later, but thats another story  .

Russ. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted

In the US (Louisiana) after the harvest they flood the rice fields then use the fields as crawfish ponds. It's my understanding that the crawfish eat the stubble that they can't harvest and that the rice fed crawfish taste much better that the swamp grown crawfish. I've always wondered why they don't do something similar here as Asians love crawfish and they probably command a higher price than rice. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/us/in-louisiana-farmers-use-rice-fields-as-crayfish-ponds.html

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...