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I recently got married,last month ago. My question is what is the advantages of 13A visa and how can I get double citizenship?  

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Congratulations on your marriage.

Dual citizenship is not possible for you but in many cases a Filiina can become a dual citizen. Not sure how laws are in Russia.

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5 minutes ago, Old55 said:

Congratulations on your marriage.

Dual citizenship is not possible for you but in many cases a Filiina can become a dual citizen. Not sure how laws are in Russia.

Same as Europe. After a period. But I don't know how much time

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30 minutes ago, Evegheny Adrian said:

advantages of 13A

Welcome!!! The main advantage is that you do not have to continually renew your tourist visa. You man also work in the country with certain restrictions (see other topics or BOI and BOE for details). The only disadvantage I have run into with a 13a is that we need to get an exit clearance if we leave the country.

Briefly the process is (other topics cover this in detail). Onse you have been in the country for 6 months with out a break you get a NBI clearance, then visit the BOI web page and follow the instructions. Pretty easy, but depending on where you live it can be inconvenient for several trips are needed. Onse approved you will get a 1 year 13a, to be extended to 5 years after your probation.

33 minutes ago, Evegheny Adrian said:

how can I get double citizenship?  

Unless things have changed since I researched this it is possible but extremely difficult to get Philippine citizenship. 10 year residency and fluent in Tagalog or one of the major dialekts. 

In fact just last week I met an Englishman, who was raised here from the age of 9, is married to a Filipina and has 3 dual citizen children. He is fluent in Tagalog. I asked him why he did not go through the process. Since he works for a foreign based company he said it just wasn't worth the hassle :thumbsup:

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8 minutes ago, scott h said:

10 year residency and fluent in Tagalog or one of the major dialekts.

I believe it is five years residency if married to a Philippine citizen.

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On 4/22/2018 at 5:37 PM, Old55 said:

Congratulations on your marriage.

Dual citizenship is not possible for you but in many cases a Filiina can become a dual citizen. Not sure how laws are in Russia.

Technically Dual Citizenship in the Philippines is only for former Filipinos.

But you can become a Citizen and hold citizenship elsewhere.

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On 4/22/2018 at 6:03 PM, scott h said:

Welcome!!! The main advantage is that you do not have to continually renew your tourist visa. You man also work in the country with certain restrictions (see other topics or BOI and BOE for details). The only disadvantage I have run into with a 13a is that we need to get an exit clearance if we leave the country.

Briefly the process is (other topics cover this in detail). Onse you have been in the country for 6 months with out a break you get a NBI clearance, then visit the BOI web page and follow the instructions. Pretty easy, but depending on where you live it can be inconvenient for several trips are needed. Onse approved you will get a 1 year 13a, to be extended to 5 years after your probation.

Unless things have changed since I researched this it is possible but extremely difficult to get Philippine citizenship. 10 year residency and fluent in Tagalog or one of the major dialekts. 

In fact just last week I met an Englishman, who was raised here from the age of 9, is married to a Filipina and has 3 dual citizen children. He is fluent in Tagalog. I asked him why he did not go through the process. Since he works for a foreign based company he said it just wasn't worth the hassle :thumbsup:

13a Permanent is not for 5 years, it is for life. Once you convert your CRTV into an ICR, it never expires!

Citizenship is after 5 years, and you have to prove you are not deadbeat, know Philippine history, law, and speak one of the languages, and English or Spanish. Basically, you just have to be Filipino.

 

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59 minutes ago, DonnyQ said:

13a Permanent is not for 5 years, it is for life. Once you convert your CRTV into an ICR, it never expires!

It is only permanent so long as your wife wants you to stay.  If you split with your wife and she goes to immigration they WILL cancel your 13a and if she is horribly mean enough she MAY tell a bunch of lies to get you blacklisted.  The for sure thing is they WILL cancel your 13a in that situation.

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5 hours ago, DonnyQ said:

Technically Dual Citizenship in the Philippines is only for former Filipinos.

But you can become a Citizen and hold citizenship elsewhere.

 

Ummm... I'm not sure I understand what the difference is?

I thought you had to renounce your existing citizenship to become a Filipino citizen if you weren't a former Filipino?

 

Or are you implying that you can obtain a 2nd citizenship after you become a Philippines citizen (so you could get a Panama passport for example but only after you ceased to be a US citizen or an EU citizen or an Australia citizen)?

 

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, GeoffH said:

 

Ummm... I'm not sure I understand what the difference is?

I thought you had to renounce your existing citizenship to become a Filipino citizen if you weren't a former Filipino?

 

Or are you implying that you can obtain a 2nd citizenship after you become a Philippines citizen (so you could get a Panama passport for example but only after you ceased to be a US citizen or an EU citizen or an Australia citizen)?

 

 

 

 

No, you don't have to renounce anything legally. It is only a ceremonial thing. I think Germany and Japan are the only nations in the world that require you legally renounce. Taiwan does as well, but before you even begin the process,effectively making you stateless. Strange rule for a nation not recognized by half the world.

In the Philippines, Dual Citizens can have the rights of both. Whatever that is. But if you naturalize, and still have a different nationality, you will always be Filipino on Philippine soil. Not much of a difference, but it is technical. Like if you have kids that are Natural Born versus born to a former Filipino Naturalized under the Requisition law. They are still Filipino, but are listed different.

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