Pili nut tree

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Posted (edited)

Hi all,

So I think I've told you guys of my interest in growing macadamia trees when I retire to the Philippines.  Not necessarily any kind of commercial venture but for fun, shade and (of course) awesome tasting nuts.

I've also come across the Pili tree in my research which is indigenous to the Philippines.  I've had the chance to taste them and their like the second cousin to the macadamia in taste.  Both very buttery tasting.

Has anyone grown these in their garden?  I'm also going to do some more research on pollination of these trees and whether being in close proximity whether these two could be subject to cross-pollination.

Anyone know of any other good nuts grown in the Phillipines?  I know about Brazil nuts and cashews but any other good native plants?

Yes, I know.  I love nuts...and I am nuts 😂😂

Edited by Balisidar
Edited for spelling in title
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Posted

Pili nuts are now an export product. I have seen them sold in Honolulu and Los Angeles, although the buyers maybe Fil-Ams.  Bicol reputed grows the best quality nuts and plants sell at a premium when the seller claims they are from Bicol.  

Macadamia is a little more difficult to cultivate. We had a few trees at the family farm, but it was mostly for novelty. Difficult nut to crack. Literally. Biggest commercial growers at in Fiji, Central and South America. I met several farmers at a food show in Ecuador.  There are commercial growers in the Philippines for the Hawaii macadamia market. You should therefore be able to source for plants.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, JJReyes said:

Pili nuts are now an export product. I have seen them sold in Honolulu and Los Angeles, although the buyers maybe Fil-Ams.  Bicol reputed grows the best quality nuts and plants sell at a premium when the seller claims they are from Bicol.  

Macadamia is a little more difficult to cultivate. We had a few trees at the family farm, but it was mostly for novelty. Difficult nut to crack. Literally. Biggest commercial growers at in Fiji, Central and South America. I met several farmers at a food show in Ecuador.  There are commercial growers in the Philippines for the Hawaii macadamia market. You should therefore be able to source for plants.

Nice JJ.  Yes, I saw that Pili nuts are becoming a popular export.  I actually convinced the Filipino food store in my neighborhood to stock them.   It's how I got my first taste.  Delicious 😋.

Macadamia trees are also pretty available and another up and coming agricultural product in the P.I.  Like I said though, I'm more into the home use and using a hammer 🔨 to crack em  open don't bother me.

Any more suggestions on local nuts?  My wife and I both love cashews and cashew apples.😁

Edited by Balisidar
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Posted

Filipinos love to eat cashew, pili, watermelon, sunflower, squash/pumpkin seeds and peanuts. At one time, brown sugar coated barako coffee beans were a fad, but their popularity faded. They have chocolate covered coffee beans in the United States which my wife buys from Cracker Barrel. We are in Bend, Oregon on our way to Kitsap Peninsula, Washington and yesterday, my wife asked me to keep an eye out for a Cracker Barrel restaurant. That means her stock is getting low. (I personally don't like them).

My childhood memories include molasses cakes from Negros embedded with tiny nuts. It could be something similar to pine nuts.

I read that there are macadamia farms in the Philippines. The corporate ownership is Japanese or Hawaiian. With the high cost of labor, you can no longer profitably grow macadamia in Hawaii. They have a few demonstration farms on the Big Island for visitors, but nearly all macadamia nuts come from elsewhere.

By the way, they have a tool that reminds you of pliers. At the demonstration farms, visitors can try cracking nuts. You might try to source for this nutcracker to take to the Philippines. Better than using a hammer.

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Posted
7 hours ago, JJReyes said:

We are in Bend, Oregon on our way to Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

Off topic, but be sure to go to "Grove of the Patriarchs" located in Mount Rainier National Park.  Huge trees, some estimated to be over 1000 years old.  If it fits your schedule, also drive the "North Cascade Highway".  Incredible views and scenery.

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41 minutes ago, Mike J said:

Off topic, but be sure to go to "Grove of the Patriarchs" located in Mount Rainier National Park.  Huge trees, some estimated to be over 1000 years old.  If it fits your schedule, also drive the "North Cascade Highway".  Incredible views and scenery.

Off topic.  Thanks for the heads up. We have two weeks for touring before meeting our children and their families for a cruise to Alaska from Seattle. Memorial Weekend is the start of the summer and prices have gone up. Our current RV park is charging $60.00 per night for what is essentially a parking space with electric, water and sewage connection.

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23 hours ago, Balisidar said:

Nice JJ.  Yes, I saw that Pili nuts are becoming a popular export.  I actually convinced the Filipino food store in my neighborhood to stock them.   It's how I got my first taste.  Delicious 😋.

Macadamia trees are also pretty available and another up and coming agricultural product in the P.I.  Like I said though, I'm more into the home use and using a hammer 🔨 to crack em  open don't bother me.

Any more suggestions on local nuts?  My wife and I both love cashews and cashew apples.😁

Balisidar,  I know that Antipolo City and surrounds are famous for their cashews and  popular cashew products  I'm not familiar with any nuts or trees in our area of Cebu..

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On 6/2/2018 at 6:03 PM, Mike J said:

Actually Queenie, you have gotten to know a few "nuts" right here on this forum.  :mocking:

HEY, I resemble that remark :shock_40_anim_gif: 

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