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Dave Hounddriver

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Sometimes air temperatures are kept low to reduce the spread of disease.  Both US hospitals and prisons are kept at low temperatures.

Edited by earthdome

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59 minutes ago, earthdome said:

Sometimes air temperatures are kept low to reduce the spread of disease.  Both US hospitals and prisons are kept at low temperatures.

I see, although I doubt that this is their reasoning in malls, bars etc. Plus, if it was that, they would have to maintain their A/Cs on a very strict schedule, otherwise they’re nests of bacteria, and probably worse than warm or hot temperatures. 

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4 minutes ago, KurtVD said:

I see, although I doubt that this is their reasoning in malls, bars etc. Plus, if it was that, they would have to maintain their A/Cs on a very strict schedule, otherwise they’re nests of bacteria, and probably worse than warm or hot temperatures. 

Likely true. Just pointing out that in some instances there is a valid reason to keep the aircon turned down low.

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On 7/3/2018 at 4:24 PM, KurtVD said:

When I read the title, I thought this was going to be about the temperatures in places like malls, restaurants and the like. I am pleasantly surprised, here in the Philippines they usually set the A/C to reasonable temperatures. In Thailand, especially in Bangkok, I can’t go anywhere indoor without a warm sweater or I will definitely catch a cold; they use their A/Cs as if electricity was free, it’s a pretty stupid waste of energy, if you ask me. 

Electricity in Thailand is generated by nuclear power so it is much cheaper than in the Philippines. Indeed nuclear electricity is too cheap to meter.

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1 hour ago, Seth said:

Electricity in Thailand is generated by nuclear power so it is much cheaper than in the Philippines. Indeed nuclear electricity is too cheap to meter.

I had no idea about el. rates in Thailand, but I found that hard to believe, so I googled it and found this article (https://www.infrastructureasiaonline.com/government/indonesia-electricity-tariff-still-competitive-asean-region) which compares the rates from December 2017. Thailand is cheaper for private users, but a little bit more expensive for large businesses:

When converted, the electricity tariff in Indonesia for household users is 11 cents USD/kWh, while in Thailand it reaches 12,7 cents USD/kWh, Singapore 16,73 cents USD / kWh, Philippines 15,61 cents USD/ kWh. Rates in Malaysia and Vietnam for household consumers are cheaper, ie 9,34 cents USD/kWh and 9,67 cents USD/kWh, respectively.

For medium business consumer power, tariffs in Indonesia are 11 cents USD/kWh, lower than Malaysia (12,68 cents USD/kWh), Singapore (11,88 cents USD/kWh), and Vietnam (12,07 cents USD/kWh). Meanwhile, electricity tariffs for the same consumer in Thailand and the Philippines are lower, ie 9,6 cents USD/kWh and 9,44 cents USD/kWh.

However, for the type of large business users, electricity tariffs in Indonesia became the cheapest in ASEAN, which are 8,36 cents USD/kWh, compared to the same class consumers in Singapore which reached 11,62 cents

Edited by KurtVD

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10 hours ago, Seth said:

Indeed nuclear electricity is too cheap to meter.

A new plant would cost close approximately 8-10 billion US dollars.  Meters are extra.  If you are interested you can get a good buy on slightly used nuclear power plants.  Three Mile Island USA, Chernobyl Russia, and Fukushima Japan come to mind. :whistling:

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On 7/5/2018 at 2:03 AM, earthdome said:

Sometimes air temperatures are kept low to reduce the spread of disease.  Both US hospitals and prisons are kept at low temperatures.

 

Interesting... hospitals in Australia are generally between 22C and 26C, which falls into the Department of Health (Occupational Health & Safety) recommended range for work environments.

Edited by GeoffH
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It's not the actual price of the electricity, it's all the add ons that make the power bills so high. :whatever:

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3 hours ago, Clermont said:

it's all the add ons that make the power bills so high.

Would you be referring to various people in the neighborhood who think it is OK to attach themselves to some rich foreigner's electric supply because he will not notice or care about a few people adding themselves on? :cheers:

Edited by Dave Hounddriver

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I think it is called power loss on the bill, explained to me as a way for the electricity company to recuperate their loses from jumpers, ( where an illegal connection by someone in your area is made.) All areas are metored out and if the figures don't add up, then the shortfall is divided between the legal connectors and they pay for it. Just a note: getting less by each electrocution death. :wave:

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