Update On Tipping

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Posted

During our brief visit to Metro Manila, I noticed that all the restaurants we frequented automatically added a 10% service charge.  The only additional tip I left on the table were the coins that came with the change.  The bills were taken, the coins left behind, except on one occasion when there was more than P40 in coin change.  I pocketed all of it.

The VAT was included in the price of dishes on the menu.  The exception were luxury class hotels like Shangri-La.  The VAT and service charge were added items plus the city tax.  So it was the price of the food plus nearly 23%.  I left no additional tip, but our lunch guest said she does because her company frequently entertains clients at this particular restaurant.  The additional tip was customary to assure excellent service.  

Recently, several articles have appeared in digital media claiming that the standard minimum tip should be 20%.  Furthermore, the calculation should be on top of sales tax.  For really good service, it should be increased to 30% to 40%.  However, I suspect these articles are paid for by trade associations who sponsor bloggers and digital reporters to promote their agenda.  Cheaper than for restaurants to pay the minimum wage.  Current laws permit food and drink establishments to calculate tips as part of employee salaries.  

When using the hotel exercise room, my wife would tip ahead of time.  "Do you have a machine available?" she would ask while handing the attendant P50.  They would wipe down the equipment, then give her extra towels and bottled water. 

Finally, our hotel package included daily buffet breakfast during our 10 days stay.  The regular staff were polite but nothing special.  The enthusiasm and warmth came from a young girl serving everyone coffee and tea.  In turned out she is studying hospitality industry and the school had a tie-up with the hotel.  The current assignment was three months training.  No pay.  Free labor.  Because of her limited experience, she was to pour coffee or tea, nothing else.  So much for training. No pay.  Free labor.  I left her a substantial tip in a sealed envelope on our last day.  Big smile.  Thank you.  Sometime during our breakfast, she must have gone somewhere to open the envelope.  She was nearly crying while thanking us again.  Probably the first time she has received a tip.  It felt good knowing her "Thank You" came from the heart.

 

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Posted

Are wwe talking about the Philippines?  I really think people need to get a grip on life and work out the legale salary per day and the inflated foreigner tip. 

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Posted

The new USA law is waiters and bartenders can keep all the tips, individually or as a pool to be shared equally, if they are paid below the minimum wage.  If they receive the minimum wage, management can institute a policy sharing the tips with others -- for example, cooks and dishwashers.  

Any tips given in the Philippines can be considered as part of the employees' wages.  Possibly this is one reason more restaurants are adding an automatic 10% to the bill.  The rich foreigner usually gives more than 10%, but apparently this is causing some resentment among Filipinos.

 

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Posted
5 hours ago, JJReyes said:

The enthusiasm and warmth came from a young girl serving everyone coffee and tea.  In turned out she is studying hospitality industry and the school had a tie-up with the hotel.  The current assignment was three months training.  No pay.  Free labor.  Because of her limited experience, she was to pour coffee or tea, nothing else.  So much for training. No pay.  Free labor.  I left her a substantial tip in a sealed envelope on our last day.  Big smile.  Thank you.  Sometime during our breakfast, she must have gone somewhere to open the envelope.  She was nearly crying while thanking us again.  Probably the first time she has received a tip.  It felt good knowing her "Thank You" came from the heart.

 

This is the way to do it.  Love it!  :tiphat:

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Posted
6 hours ago, JJReyes said:

Recently, several articles have appeared in digital media claiming that the standard minimum tip should be 20%.  Furthermore, the calculation should be on top of sales tax.  For really good service, it should be increased to 30% to 40%.  However, I suspect these articles are paid for by trade associations who sponsor bloggers and digital reporters to promote their agenda.

Where did you find this JJ?  I googled and could not find anything suggesting such an outrageous tip.

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Posted

The province and city where I live has very few visible foreign residents. There are some that I know of, that are pretty much stay-at-homes, and only a few that make it it to the mall coffee shops regularly, the point being.... there is no social expectations of tips locally. So when and if the few expats here tip, a little goes a long way. Which is one of the reasons I enjoy living here. 

Case in point: once or twice a week we treat ourselves to breakfast at Chow King. Over the years, I'd give P10 to the sever who brought the food to our numbered table, because the wife would always ask for a couple of iced tap water drinks when he'd bring the food, and he'd promptly return with them. 

One day I felt the delusional need to be a grandiose patron. Maybe because when I was 16 I worked as a busboy and waitress helper in a famous restaurant and could identify with the role somewhat, maybe not, who examines or knows anymore why we do what we do sometimes. Anyway, I give the young guy a P20 note. So as we're leaving the joint, he stops his other tasks and rushes over to open the heavy glass door for our exit with a smile and 'thank you'.  I see his name tag is John, so I say, "Thank you, John." and we leave.

 A few days later we're back again. John sees us, and after we pay and have our receipt, he takes it from the wife, and brings us everything in 2 or 3 trips, silverware, pile of extra napkins, straws, ice water...including my two extra eggs (P10@... good deal for a big lad).  I discover that we now have a private server in a chain resto. Every time we visit now, he waits on us and I tip him P20 and bandy about his name in front of the pretty counter girls... which he enjoys. Heck, that probably enhances his self pride more than the extra pisos.

For me, like for J J Reyes, tipping, when done right, enhances your dining experiences and should leave you with positive feelings.  If done wrong it leaves you feeling like you've been an abused chump. Yeah, its a tough high-wire act to walk sometimes when you dine out, but it does come with some interesting and surprising opportunities to make life a bit more interesting for all involved.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

Where did you find this JJ?  I googled and could not find anything suggesting such an outrageous tip.

Every morning, I read news aggregator websites like Google, Yahoo, MSN and Bing.  However, I don't save the stories or articles.  The new rules on tipping is part of the Omnibus Bill.  The purpose is to clarify rules as to who is entitled to keep the tips.  The President administration held the opinion it was to be determined by management.  The new law clarifies that management and supervisory personnel are not entitled to a share.  Only employees, but the sharing method depends on policy guidelines by the US Department of Labor and the restaurant.  If employers pay everyone the minimum wage, they can rule that waiters and bartenders share tips with cooks, dishwashers, etc.

In terms of tip percentage, several restaurant chains like Olive Garden have a device on your table for additional orders like dessert and calculating the bill.  The default setting for tips is 20%.  You can change the tip percentage up or down, but most restaurant patrons don't bother.  

Like I said, the digital articles and their authors probably receive compensation from advocacy groups.  Any suggestion of a minimum tips at 20% or higher is outrageous.  I don't mind leaving a generous tip for excellent service, but not because it is customary or expected.  10% in the Philippines and 15% in the United States, in my opinion, is sufficient. 

Edited by JJReyes
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Posted
24 minutes ago, JJReyes said:

The President administration held the opinion it was to be determined by management. 

So Nothing will change on Distribution :whistling: Another thing that will be a 10 minute Directive to be followed :89: 

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Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Jack Peterson said:
58 minutes ago, JJReyes said:

The President administration held the opinion it was to be determined by management. 

So Nothing will change on Distribution :whistling: Another thing that will be a 10 minute Directive to be followed :89: 

Sorry.  It should read present administration.  I tried using the name of a high ranking current politician but the programming on this forum won't permit it. 

Employees deserve to receive at the very least the minimum wage.  Tips should be considered as extra, not salary.   One of my pet peeves are cruise lines who have a mandatory gratuity added to your bill of $14.00 per person per day.  Supposedly this goes to cabin attendants, restaurant staff and bartenders.  The truth is the mandatory gratuity is given to them as part of their wages.  My wife and I therefore give an additional $100 per week to the cabin attendant and another $100 per week for the restaurant team.  None to bartenders since neither one of us drink during a cruise.

Edited by JJReyes
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Posted
1 hour ago, JJReyes said:

I tried using the name of a high ranking current politician but the programming on this forum won't permit it. 

Yes stops the arguments :smile:

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