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Kuya John

Have's and Have-not's in Philippines

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4 hours ago, Tukaram (Tim) said:

I see it here all the time here.  I always kind of attributed it to the Spanish colonial period - the peons,  and the dismissive attitude towards them.  I know it is more popular here to blame the US but most of what I see, I think, is more of the Spanish colonial influence.  

The Spanish ruined almost everything wherever they went.

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God only knows what it was like BEFORE the Spanish arrived though (well,  according to their god anyway).  :biggrin:

 

eskimo.jpg

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13 hours ago, JJReyes said:

You cannot compare current social attitudes in the Philippines with modern day England.

I never did?

13 hours ago, JJReyes said:

The comparison for the Philippines today would be during the Victorian period and the exploitation of the British colonies.

That is the comparison I was making, it was only after the !st and 2nd World Wars that the lower classes in UK started to demand justice and rights, prior to that in1800's-1900's they were treated as badly and exploited as any overseas colonies.

In many ways the Filipino communities I have met remind me of my time growing up after the 2nd world war.

Every working class family pulled together and shared what little they had, a time when you could leave your doors open,

( most people had nothing worth stealing anyway) when you knew your neighbours and had a mutual trust for each other.

Days that will never come back....."The good old days" in some ways it was!

 

 

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On my visits to the Philippines I did too notice that there was no please and thank you, and when Emma came here I had to pull her up a few times about saying thank you, maybe it’s a different culture thing but you can’t beat good manners ,

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18 hours ago, JDDavao said:

I spent far too long in the trenches as a janitor and a maintenance worker

I experienced being looked down upon in the UK.Some people would say oh but you`re just a plumber.I walked off of several jobs and left them without hot water or heating yeh who`s just a plumber now then.I made one man wait a week for a new gas valve for his boiler and that winter was cold.We all have a role in society and should be treated with a certain level of respect.I too find it difficult to get workers to sit at the table when we eat I think a lot of it is shyness.

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I remember well getting bathed in a tin bath on the kitchen floor... or sometimes even the large 'Belfast' kitchen sink, back in the 50s.  

Water was heated in a 'copper'. 

Naturally the toilet was outside in the yard of our two up two down terrace house. 

The we went to live in comparative luxury in Malaya, back in 1955.  -  Had this amazing thing called a 'shower' ! 

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21 hours ago, Gary D said:

5. Police directing traffic.

You've noticed that too huh? That's what my gf and I always say to each other when we come up to a clogged intersection, and it's usually true.:thumbsup:

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23 hours ago, stevewool said:

maybe it’s a different culture thing but you can’t beat good manners ,

Well thats your perspective. If the culture does not say , please or thank you then you're only thinking in your culture ways so is there any good manners to debate here because its not the UK. 

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14 hours ago, Jollygoodfellow said:

Well thats your perspective. If the culture does not say , please or thank you then you're only thinking in your culture ways so is there any good manners to debate here because its not the UK. 

I think here the local culture does include manners how ever seldom now are they expressed. 

I notice filipino friends and family of my partner always express appreciation, how ever open a mall door for someone, slow the car for a pedestrian to cross and rarely does one get an acknowledgment. 

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5 hours ago, RBM said:

I think here the local culture does include manners how ever seldom now are they expressed. 

I notice filipino friends and family of my partner always express appreciation, how ever open a mall door for someone, slow the car for a pedestrian to cross and rarely does one get an acknowledgment. 

I greet a lot of Filipino guests for condos I manage and I think everyone of them have said thank you so it might depend on the situation. 

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