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I have not experienced drug abuse in the family thank God, however sadly my nephew's wife died of Alcoholism.

So tragic to see a beautiful young Lady, slowly kill herself because she could not cope with life.

 

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1 hour ago, Kuya John said:

Informative Topic

I have not experienced drug abuse in the family thank God, however sadly my nephew's wife died of Alcoholism.

So tragic to see a beautiful young Lady, slowly kill herself because she could not cope with life.

 

Alcoholism is a much more complex set of problems than being able to cope with life . I had one guy who I was trying to help ,shoot his brains out , I felt so guilty about what I saw as my failure ,at his service , his wife gave me a suicide note , he wrote ,"thank you fir everything that you and the fellowship.have done for me , please forgive me for my pain is too much "

I've seen peers of the realm , I was in first name terms with.rock and roll gods , ivevsat next to tradesmen ,soldiers and smoking hit women

Alcoholism is an illness that at present has no cure , only remission one day at a time , recovering alcoholics like myself had to get to a place in life where enough was enough , unfortunately not all alcoholics find that place

Sober and saner I think lol ( today ) 

24 years and 3 months since I took my last drink :thumbsup:

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5 hours ago, bastonjock said:

Alcoholism is an illness that at present has no cure , only remission one day at a time , recovering alcoholics like myself had to get to a place in life where enough was enough , unfortunately not all alcoholics find that place

Sober and saner I think lol ( today ) 

Bastonjock

Thanks for sharing that true life story, regards JB

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After almost 50 years into the "war on drugs" the problem is no better and likely even worse. The "war on drugs" has failed. The best strategy is to work towards harm reduction. Policies that reduce the overall harm to individuals, their families and society from those who abuse drugs (and I include alcohol as a drug).

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On 2/7/2019 at 8:17 PM, OnMyWay said:

It would appear to me, seeing all the kids staring at dumb phones all day, that many parents use Waze to direct their children in the right direction.  :89:

I thought those were “smart phones”

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On 2/7/2019 at 8:47 PM, bastonjock said:

I've just been watching a documentary on drug abuse ,I thought I had heard of them all ,but theres a new one to me called Krokodil ,apparently is got its origins in Russia and its spreading out ,its hit the USA and Europe , has it got to the Phil's yet ? It's on a price level with shabu , it usually kills the user within a year ,their flesh falls off right down to the bone 

The pictures are quite disgusting of the users , I thought shabu was bad but this stuff 

Apparently it can be made from over the counter medicines 

Its not new, there is a vice documentary on YouTube about it from several years ago

 

They use it because its cheaper than opiates, hopefully it doesn't get popular in the 🇵🇭 

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On 2/9/2019 at 5:32 AM, earthdome said:

After almost 50 years into the "war on drugs" the problem is no better and likely even worse. The "war on drugs" has failed. The best strategy is to work towards harm reduction. Policies that reduce the overall harm to individuals, their families and society from those who abuse drugs (and I include alcohol as a drug).

Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. The USA showed everybody that making illegal something people want does not work. They just find alternative ways of getting the drug they want. I am of course talking about Prohibition. To my mind, (and this is just my opinion, I don't expect to change the minds of those who think they should be able to "ban everything" they themselves don't like), it would be far better to regulate and tax drugs in the same way as cigarettes and alcohol. Money raised could then be used to help people who want to quit. Sadly I think it's a debate that gets shouted down far too quickly.

Please note I don't and never have done "drugs" other than alcohol and previously tobacco so I don't have any axes to grind.

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4 hours ago, DavidK said:

Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. The USA showed everybody that making illegal something people want does not work. They just find alternative ways of getting the drug they want. I am of course talking about Prohibition. To my mind, (and this is just my opinion, I don't expect to change the minds of those who think they should be able to "ban everything" they themselves don't like), it would be far better to regulate and tax drugs in the same way as cigarettes and alcohol. Money raised could then be used to help people who want to quit. Sadly I think it's a debate that gets shouted down far too quickly.

Please note I don't and never have done "drugs" other than alcohol and previously tobacco so I don't have any axes to grind.

I understand the argument about legalising and legitamising things that banning seems ineffective for but I have reservations about the argument that the tax money raised can/will be used effectively to treat the problem.  How much tax has been raised through tobacco sales and how effective has this been in reducing tobacco consumption?  I don't have the answer but my gut-feeling is that trends tend to impact consumption much more than anything else.  Maybe education influences those trends more than I give it credit for.  

Not rocket science, but taking the profit out of illegal ventures is the best way to stop them but, those involved simply turn to another income stream to replace the lost revenue.  

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7 hours ago, hk blues said:

Not rocket science, but taking the profit out of illegal ventures is the best way to stop them but, those involved simply turn to another income stream to replace the lost revenue.  

Yes, criminals will be criminals. Yet, the drug trade is tens of thousands of times more profitable than any other criminal enterprise. The money is so easy. Kids in the inner city see that selling drugs on the street corner is easy money compared to a real job. I think there will be far fewer criminals if they don't have an illegal drug culture to fuel their creation with easy money.

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17 hours ago, earthdome said:

Yes, criminals will be criminals. Yet, the drug trade is tens of thousands of times more profitable than any other criminal enterprise. The money is so easy. Kids in the inner city see that selling drugs on the street corner is easy money compared to a real job. I think there will be far fewer criminals if they don't have an illegal drug culture to fuel their creation with easy money.

I perceive there is a general acceptance of drugs in society, with comments like alcohol and tobacco are just as bad etc etc and people trying to quantify illegal drugs into not so bad illegal, bad illegal and very bad illegal.  I know the legal systems categorise similarly and I'm not saying it''s wrong to do so, but it all encourages a culture of tacit acceptance of some drugs - the thin end of the wedge comes to mind.  

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