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Mark Berkowitz

Repatriation:  Yes, you can go home again!

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5 hours ago, Gary D said:

Not sure that's true. It would effect any widows pension but everyone now get their own pension depending on how many years they have worked. My wife will see about 2/3 of the srate pension for her 23 years.

Yes and you are in the UK this about repatriation.

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Regarding education and job opportunities for my daughter. My goal is that our daughter will receive an education and life experiences that will help her be successful and happy regardless of where in the world she decides to spend her time.  There is a small but growing number of digital nomads. Young people who have no permanent home but travel the world making their money doing work on their laptop.

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7 hours ago, Gary D said:

Not sure that's true. It would effect any widows pension but everyone now get their own pension depending on how many years they have worked. My wife will see about 2/3 of the srate pension for her 23 years.

I'm confused by your answer.  Are you talking about state pension or private pension?  If state pension, it is my understanding that as the age gap between my wife and I is over 10 years she would not get any widow's pension when I pass away - that was the position when I last checked.  The state pension is not based on years worked - regardless of working 35 years or 40 years the amount is the same i.e. when you reach the maximum that's it.  Of course my wife will get zero state pension in her own right as she has never paid NI - she is a Filipina living in the Philippines! 

 

 

Edited by hk blues
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2 hours ago, hk blues said:

I'm confused by your answer.  Are you talking about state pension or private pension?  If state pension, it is my understanding that as the age gap between my wife and I is over 10 years she would not get any widow's pension when I pass away - that was the position when I last checked.  The state pension is not based on years worked - regardless of working 35 years or 40 years the amount is the same i.e. when you reach the maximum that's it.  Of course my wife will get zero state pension in her own right as she has never paid NI - she is a Filipina living in the Philippines! 

 

 

   I'm glad to see someone has mentioned the fact that many government pensions have quite a series of qualifiers and limitations on a widow's possible pension survivor's  claims.  In many cases of an older man who lives here solely on his USA social security old age benefits, his wife will no longer have any income source when he dies. (if they have minor children she will have limited benefits until the children become young adults, then it ends for all, I believe.)This is something that should be taken into consideration when entering a large age gap marriage.  One would be wise to check the government's web sites re survivor benefits to see what your wife's standing will be someday if you pre-decease her.

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4 hours ago, hk blues said:

I'm confused by your answer.  Are you talking about state pension or private pension?  If state pension, it is my understanding that as the age gap between my wife and I is over 10 years she would not get any widow's pension when I pass away - that was the position when I last checked.  The state pension is not based on years worked - regardless of working 35 years or 40 years the amount is the same i.e. when you reach the maximum that's it.  Of course my wife will get zero state pension in her own right as she has never paid NI - she is a Filipina living in the Philippines! 

 

 

Yes you are correct aboit age difference but even if she did qualify it's only for something like 18 months. Re private pension it depends how you set it up, she could get some pension surviving you but at a reduced pension whilst you receive it.

Edited by Gary D

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10 hours ago, hk blues said:

I'm confused by your answer.  Are you talking about state pension or private pension?  If state pension, it is my understanding that as the age gap between my wife and I is over 10 years she would not get any widow's pension when I pass away - that was the position when I last checked.  The state pension is not based on years worked - regardless of working 35 years or 40 years the amount is the same i.e. when you reach the maximum that's it.  Of course my wife will get zero state pension in her own right as she has never paid NI - she is a Filipina living in the Philippines! 

 

 

I don't think there's an age gap rule anymore, it's called something else now. It's only about a total of 4k though anyway.
https://www.gov.uk/bereavement-support-payment

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10 hours ago, manofthecoldland said:

   I'm glad to see someone has mentioned the fact that many government pensions have quite a series of qualifiers and limitations on a widow's possible pension survivor's  claims.  In many cases of an older man who lives here solely on his USA social security old age benefits, his wife will no longer have any income source when he dies. (if they have minor children she will have limited benefits until the children become young adults, then it ends for all, I believe.)This is something that should be taken into consideration when entering a large age gap marriage.  One would be wise to check the government's web sites re survivor benefits to see what your wife's standing will be someday if you pre-decease her.

Yes, I have done the research for U.S. SS and in most cases the young wife will have to wait until she is old to collect on her older husband's account.

Without any children involved, first she has to live in the U.S. for 5 years.  Then she can collect on his account when she is 62.  If he is still alive, it would be about 50% of his.  If he is dead, it would be somewhat higher.  If she works and builds her own SS account, they will give her the higher of the two when she is 62.

In my case, adding my wife to SS does nothing because I have 2 kids collecting until they are 18 and we are at the family maximum.  When the first turns 18 she will be 57 and would still need to wait until she turns 62 to collect, if she meets other requirement.

Edited by OnMyWay
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10 hours ago, Gary D said:

Yes you are correct aboit age difference but even if she did qualify it's only for something like 18 months. Re private pension it depends how you set it up, she could get some pension surviving you but at a reduced pension whilst you receive it.

Yes, state pension (widow's pension) is a no-go for us as we have a 12 year age gap. I have 4 private pensions which will become payable when I'm 65 and I can choose from a menu of options including a widow's pension once I'm gone.  

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On 2/14/2019 at 1:45 AM, nor cal mike said:

However the problem I see here is the amount of political reference brought into the classroom. What I see taking place is indoctrination instead of education. If you look at our institutions of higher learning you see ongoing civil unrest and political violence.

Your post is a good summary of a big problem.  Jordan Peterson on the PragerU channel has a great segment on this very problem. I think it's called something like 'Dangerous people are teaching your kids'.

 

Edited by CoffeeRulzMe
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2 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

Yes, I have done the research for U.S. SS and in most cases the young wife will have to wait until she is old to collect on her older husband's account.

Without any children involved, first she has to live in the U.S. for 5 years.  Then she can collect on his account when she is 62.  If he is still alive, it would be about 50% of his.  If he is dead, it would be somewhat higher.  If she works and builds her own SS account, they will give her the higher of the two when she is 62.

In my case, adding my wife to SS does nothing because I have 2 kids collecting until they are 18 and we are at the family maximum.  When the first turns 18 she will be 57 and would still need to wait until she turns 62 to collect, if she meets other requirement.

Great information, thank you.  My situation is similar to yours in that we have 2 children and my wife will be 57 when the oldest turns 18. Do you happen to know if that 5 years has to be immediately preceding the claim? My wife has been here 18 years but will be living in PI when the time comes for her to file for benefits. I’m wondering if she will have to come back here for 5 years before she qualifies?

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