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Jack Peterson

Somedays I sit and Wonder

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Interesting information. Mine also teaches grade 7. Yeah... the requirement here is to teach in Tagalog. I am learning that there are a lot of things here that just don't make sense to me. No criticism, just the observation. I have seen some Filipinos use incredible ingenuity to repair or create amazing things in ways that Westerners could never imagine. I have seen some really nice welding work too. But then I look at the laying of hollowblocks (cinderblocks in my language) that look like 5 year old kids did the "work" and then just tossed the masa(?) afterwards to sort of fill in the gaps. This is definitely a nation with many interesting facets. I learn new things every day...

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4 hours ago, Old55 said:

Could your friends inability to be understood speaking Bisaya be due to the fact he spoke it with an English accent? :2245_safe:

Could be true. 

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I've never had a problem with any Filipino understanding me when I speak English to them. The problem seems to be that some of them are too embarrassed and intimidated to respond in English. They call it making their nose bleed.:unsure: 

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3 hours ago, Arizona Kid said:

I've never had a problem with any Filipino understanding me when I speak English to them.

AK your day will come believe me :wink:

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The main problem is that they are very good at making you think they have understood you.

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6 hours ago, Gary D said:

The main problem is that they are very good at making you think they have understood you.

Maybe part of the culture?  I have read that it is common for some asian people to answer "yes" , or smile and nod "yes" , when someone is trying to explain something even when they do not understand what you said.   I can kind of see their point of view considering some people seem to think the way to make the message more clear is to say the same thing but RAISE THEIR VOICE.  Americans seem to do this fairly often.  A raised voice in the Philippines is representative of either anger, frustration, or disrespect, none of which facilitates an exchange of information.

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I have seen many foreigners in so many countries say something to a local in English and when the locals show no understanding, the foreigners raise their voice. Rather, I try to speak more slowly than usual and use hand motions to try to communicate when I cannot use the local language. I smile a lot too - and that helps a bunch!

I once asked a guy in Tonga "Is this a cooking banana or an eating banana?" The answer was, "Yes" So either it was both or no understanding... I will never know. (but it turned out to be a cooking banana).

I have also asked for directions to get to some place and been sent kms in the wrong direction just because the locals were eager to please and not seem helpful or knowledgeable. It really touches me with the friendliness and eagerness to please foreigners that I have encountered in so many places - and especially her in the Philippines!

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20 hours ago, Jack Peterson said:

AK your day will come believe me :wink:

I may have misspoke. Last time our old washing machine was on it's last legs my GF told me that her mom, our housekeeper wanted a bigger one when we replaced it. So off to the store we go and immediately I start looking for a 7.0 kilo or bigger machine. I found one at a good price and showed her. She rejected it and led me to a 6.2 kilo machine and said we needed to buy it. Turns out it wasn't the bigger capacity that the mom wanted but a bigger opening where the clothes are put in. She has fat arms!:hystery: 

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8 hours ago, Mike J said:

Maybe part of the culture?  I have read that it is common for some asian people to answer "yes" , or smile and nod "yes" , when someone is trying to explain something even when they do not understand what you said.   I can kind of see their point of view considering some people seem to think the way to make the message more clear is to say the same thing but RAISE THEIR VOICE.  Americans seem to do this fairly often.  A raised voice in the Philippines is representative of either anger, frustration, or disrespect, none of which facilitates an exchange of information.

Especially in Japan. Even if they don't understand you, you think they do with the nod. I have a new neighbor next door here in the Phills, maybe in his mid 30's. Has a boyfriend. My sons basketball went in their yard 2 days ago and he refused to give it back. I called his name over the 4 ft fence just to talk to him about it and he was full of rage. Couldn't believe it, over a basketball. I calmed him down enough to get the ball back with a promise that it wouldn't happen again. Apparently some people aren't happy unless they are angry.:shock_40_anim_gif:   

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10 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

"Is this a cooking banana or an eating banana?" The answer was, "Yes" So either it was both or no understanding..

Either way it is to be eaten :smile:

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