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Tommy T.

Talk about getting screwed!

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3 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

Many years ago some products were introduced to "self-seal" car tires. I learned, when at a tire store that they hated that. The gooey stuff made a big mess inside the tire so that, when that goo didn't totally seal the tire, it was a nightmare to clean out all the gunk in order to fix the leak. I wonder how well the factory self-sealing tires work? I had a blowout with a run-flat last year but was able to drive the car - slowly - another 2 kms to where I could change to the spare (the lug bolts were on so tight with an air wrench that I couldn't crack them loose so I found a strapping young kid who did that for me). Of course, the tire was shredded, but the rim was fine. I am a believer!

I believe it was Michelin who made them and the viscous goo was between the inside rubber and the belts, so no mess. They just didn't seal when it got really cold.

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2 minutes ago, robert k said:

They just didn't seal when it got really cold.

Hmmm.... can't imagine that being too much of a problem here?:hystery:

Thanks for the details. Sounds a lot better than that old injectible goo system!

 

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1 minute ago, Tommy T. said:

Hmmm.... can't imagine that being too much of a problem here?:hystery:

Thanks for the details. Sounds a lot better than that old injectible goo system!

 

The other problem was they were expensive, at least in the early stages. They would have almost as much as new standard tires do now!:hystery:

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1 minute ago, robert k said:

The other problem was they were expensive, at least in the early stages. They would have almost as much as new standard tires do now!:hystery:

I hear you. I just had to buy a new set of tires that are a very odd size and almost impossible to find here - they ended up being Taiwanese and (knock on wood:bonk:) they seem okay so far. They ran me about P20,000 for the four.

The only problem I have now is the the rims (also an odd size) are chromed and tending to rust and chip - especially right where the tire bead meets the rim. Up until about a month ago, I had to take the care to a vulcanizing shop where they would check and find the slow leak at the bead, carefully grind the offending metal bits off, apply some sort of goo and then remount it. - All four tires needed this treatment at least once and the front two required 3-4 treatments each. Now they have been fine for over a month...fingers crossed.

It is not so expensive for them to do that repair - maybe P300, but it's the hassle of driving to a shop that I know does quality work and having to sit around for half an hour - swatting flies - while they do their magic...that's what irritates a bit.

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2 minutes ago, Tommy T. said:

I hear you. I just had to buy a new set of tires that are a very odd size and almost impossible to find here - they ended up being Taiwanese and (knock on wood:bonk:) they seem okay so far. They ran me about P20,000 for the four.

The only problem I have now is the the rims (also an odd size) are chromed and tending to rust and chip - especially right where the tire bead meets the rim. Up until about a month ago, I had to take the care to a vulcanizing shop where they would check and find the slow leak at the bead, carefully grind the offending metal bits off, apply some sort of goo and then remount it. - All four tires needed this treatment at least once and the front two required 3-4 treatments each. Now they have been fine for over a month...fingers crossed.

It is not so expensive for them to do that repair - maybe P300, but it's the hassle of driving to a shop that I know does quality work and having to sit around for half an hour - swatting flies - while they do their magic...that's what irritates a bit.

I would try rust converter, don't clean the rust, it adds to the thickness of the protection after it's converted. That or silicone grease. In that order, the rust converter wouldn't penetrate once the pores were full of grease. I used to also over inflate tires considerably to make the really seat on the bead, then let the air out to the proper specification. Might be worth a try.

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4 minutes ago, robert k said:

I would try rust converter, don't clean the rust, it adds to the thickness of the protection after it's converted. That or silicone grease. In that order, the rust converter wouldn't penetrate once the pores were full of grease. I used to also over inflate tires considerably to make the really seat on the bead, then let the air out to the proper specification. Might be worth a try.

Hey, robert...anything is worth a try! Thanks for the suggestions. I am familiar with rust converter - used it a number of times aboard my yacht as the salt water took its inevitable toll - but hadn't thought of that for this situation. When they show me problem, it seems to be mostly the chrome flakes off and leaves abrupt edges and that's where most of the leaks seem to be. But rust is increasing with age - like arthritis and flatulence with some of us oldies...(at least me:smile:). I will definitely see about the over -inflation trick too. I did that back when I worked in a gas station as a teen - usually helped seal problem tire/rim issues.

The good thing - like I mentioned before - is that I was having this problem every couple of weeks until recently and now all tires have been okay. I hope I didn't jinx myself by saying that... I will post next time it happens and share it with you.

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3 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

 

The good thing - like I mentioned before - is that I was having this problem every couple of weeks until recently and now all tires have been okay. I hope I didn't jinx myself by saying that... I will post next time it happens and share it with you.

Hopefully there won't be a next time.:smile:

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9 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

AK... that looks like it was a wet dream?:hystery:

Don't tell anybody,ok?:wait_80_anim_gif:

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5 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

Hey, robert...anything is worth a try! Thanks for the suggestions. I am familiar with rust converter - used it a number of times aboard my yacht as the salt water took its inevitable toll - but hadn't thought of that for this situation. When they show me problem, it seems to be mostly the chrome flakes off and leaves abrupt edges and that's where most of the leaks seem to be. But rust is increasing with age - like arthritis and flatulence with some of us oldies...(at least me:smile:). I will definitely see about the over -inflation trick too. I did that back when I worked in a gas station as a teen - usually helped seal problem tire/rim issues.

The good thing - like I mentioned before - is that I was having this problem every couple of weeks until recently and now all tires have been okay. I hope I didn't jinx myself by saying that... I will post next time it happens and share it with you.

I had a yacht once. It was about 10ft long and made out of aluminum. Had to row it tho..couldn't afford a motor.:tongue: 

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20 minutes ago, Arizona Kid said:

Don't tell anybody,ok?:wait_80_anim_gif:

Don't worry... it will be our secret - no one else will know...:whistling:

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