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Tommy T.

Chocolate Cookies with Salted Caramel Chips

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2 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

Well, Viking, the main reason for us picking gas for all cooking is because electricity is expensive here. Water is practically free, but power is costly. Since I like to bake things and also roast meats, I tend to use an oven often. I think it is an overreaction after all those years on the yacht in the tropics where baking or roasting made the boat unlivable. Now I can turn on a fan.

I'm sure someone here on the forum will have numbers to compare for electricity vs. gas. I have not had my coffee yet so am rather unmotivated to look them up right now... But I just brewed some so I will fully awaken soon...:morning1:

I always thought it was nice to have gas burners/stove in the Philippines so you can still cook during a brownout.

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, earthdome said:

I always thought it was nice to have gas burners/stove in the Philippines so you can still cook during a brownout.

Yes... we thought that also, so we paid almost 30,000 for a combination gas/electric stove.

In the 12 months before I got stuck for the duration in Aussie the electric 'burner' still hadn't been used (except by me to make sure it worked).  When the gas runs out SWMBO's mama asks someone to go get more gas so she can continue cooking LOL or she goes to the small bench top gas cooker in the dirty kitchen.

It would be ok if you do your own cooking.

Edited by GeoffH
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We have an Elba stove/cooker - we chose the particular model because it had a side section for the gas cylinder so more attractive.  It's all gas but has 1 electric "burner" so even if we suddenly run out of gas we have some means to cook.  The problem with the gas is there is no way to tell how much is left so suddenly running out always happens.  That said, we are able to get another cylinder quickly so no big deal.  

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47 minutes ago, hk blues said:

It's all gas but has 1 electric "burner" so even if we suddenly run out of gas we have some means to cook.  The problem with the gas is there is no way to tell how much is left so suddenly running out always happens.  That said, we are able to get another cylinder quickly so no big deal.  

That's why I am opting to have a two-tank manifold. I guess I got used to that on the yacht when there was no replacement for a gas bottle thousands of miles from a dealer?:smile:

I don't know if you wish to drop the cash for one, but I have seen fiberglass propane tanks for sale here. They are translucent so you can actually see the level in the tanks. In USA they were spendy (I just kept with two aluminum tanks since I already had them.

Anyway... just a couple of ideas for you, HK...

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36 minutes ago, Tommy T. said:

That's why I am opting to have a two-tank manifold. I guess I got used to that on the yacht when there was no replacement for a gas bottle thousands of miles from a dealer?:smile:

I don't know if you wish to drop the cash for one, but I have seen fiberglass propane tanks for sale here. They are translucent so you can actually see the level in the tanks. In USA they were spendy (I just kept with two aluminum tanks since I already had them.

Anyway... just a couple of ideas for you, HK...

I've not seen such tanks here, Tom.  I doubt my supplier has them.  Anyway, my wife would no doubt ignore that anyway!  

As I said, we can get a tank in a few hours and we have a microwave, a toaster oven and the electric burner so unless we have a brownout and the cylinder goes empty at the same time we're good.  

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tommy T. said:

I have seen fiberglass propane tanks for sale here.

You can buy inline propane pressure guages in Australia and New Zealand as well as Propane Level indicators.  I couldn't find one in the Philippines when I was there, maybe I should bring some back with me?  I'd have to find out if the threads for the tanks are the same for the guages but the level indicators that doesn't matter.  The level indicators are just put on the sides of the tank and show the temperature difference between the liquid propane level and the gas above that (which are at different temperatures).  Not sure if those middle ones can be easily swapped between tanks (sticky type) but there are magnetic ones as well.

 

 

Propane Pressure Guage.jpg

Propane Level Indicator.jpg

Propane Level Indicator Magnetic.jpg

Edited by GeoffH
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43 minutes ago, GeoffH said:

guages

I am not sure what is available any more, but the gauge I had on the yacht fit into a T connector in the supply line itself, not as part of the actual tank fitting.

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1 hour ago, Tommy T. said:

I am not sure what is available any more, but the gauge I had on the yacht fit into a T connector in the supply line itself, not as part of the actual tank fitting.

I confess I have not seen that type.  On my investment property that I recently sold there was a T piece with a rotating lever to switch between the two tanks but each tank just had a stick on level indicator (which was really only of use when the tank got low).

In Bendigo where I am now there is piped natural gas so there aren't many suppliers of propane equipment except for BBQ and camping shops.

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2 hours ago, GeoffH said:

In Bendigo where I am now there is piped natural gas so there aren't many suppliers of propane equipment except for BBQ and camping shops.

Those are the sort of shops to check out. Also, stop by marine stores - they usually carry propane plumbing - and actual propane suppliers. I wish I had a photo to show you from the yacht.

Even then, the gauge is normally referred to as a "leak detector." You charge up the line from a tank, then shut off the tank valve and see if the line with the gauge holds the charge. If not, then break out the soapy water and watch for bubbles at all the fittings.

For me, having the two tanks was wonderful and made for only a minimal disturbance. I did not have the two tank manifold, but just a hose with fitting that I would swap from one tank to the other. In Oz and NZ, you need to have rigid piping from tank to appliance. Being a foreign yacht, the requirement was waived.

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14 hours ago, hk blues said:

The problem with the gas is there is no way to tell how much is left so suddenly running out always happens

From memory you can tell by the coldest on the side of the bottle but of course have to check from time to time.

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