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What pipe did you use in your construction Tommy?  The plastic pipe which the joints are glued or the PPR which has the heat bonded/welded joints?  I just cannot think how the heat bonded joint would have leaked if installed properly.  The PPR is rated at 360 PSI/25 Bars with a 50 year life span at temp of 70*C

The one thing I don't like about the PPR is that there are times where it requires 2 people to connect joints because of the fussion/heating tool being operated by one in confined spaces.

Edited by intrepid
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3 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

copper for the pressure lines with the sweated solder joints.

They have some new copper joints, all you have to do cut two sides of a leak and slip them into the sleeve.  I was not sure about them, tried them and worked on a few pipes that leaked.  Also used them when I installed a new hot water heater at the house, worked like a charm.  No need to solder joints anymore.

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http://mobileimages.lowes.com/product/converted/697285/697285500792.jpg?size=pdhi

SharkBite 1/2-in Push-to-Connect x 1/2-in Push-to-Connect dia Coupling Push Fitting

  • Lead free DZR brass construction for durability and reliability

  • Use to connect to any combination of copper, PEX, CPVC or PE-RT pipes

  • Innovative push-to-connect design makes for quick and easy installation

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2 hours ago, intrepid said:

What pipe did you use in your construction Tommy?  The plastic pipe which the joints are glued or the PPR which has the heat bonded/welded joints?  I just cannot think how the heat bonded joint would have leaked if installed properly.  The PPR is rated at 360 PSI/25 Bars with a 50 year life span at temp of 70*C

The one thing I don't like about the PPR is that there are times where it requires 2 people to connect joints because of the fussion/heating tool being operated by one in confined spaces.

They used PPR for the pipes Intrepid. I can give you many reasons why it might have leaked (as in not installed properly?:89:) Not all was constructed to "factory" spec. The foreman did most of the plumbing and he is definitely not a journeyman plumber. However, upon observation, most of the work he did looks okay. We will have a one year warranty on the construction and you can count on it that we will do everything to make things break before time's up....not maliciously, of course, but we will exercise everything we can to find weak points.

 

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2 hours ago, Yeochief said:

They have some new copper joints, all you have to do cut two sides of a leak and slip them into the sleeve.  I was not sure about them, tried them and worked on a few pipes that leaked.  Also used them when I installed a new hot water heater at the house, worked like a charm.  No need to solder joints anymore.

That's very interesting... I wonder how they do that?

On the yacht, an Ozzie guy showed me high pressure oil fittings that did not require clamps... what??? They are barbed fittings that, once hoses are installed, they cannot be removed without cutting the hose.

I actually got pretty good with sweating copper pipes...I watched our plumber very carefully when he plumbed the house years ago... My work was not nearly as neat, but it held okay.

Ooops! I just read your second post about how this works - as Spock would say..."fascinating!"

Edited by Tommy T.
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8 hours ago, Yeochief said:

http://mobileimages.lowes.com/product/converted/697285/697285500792.jpg?size=pdhi

SharkBite 1/2-in Push-to-Connect x 1/2-in Push-to-Connect dia Coupling Push Fitting

  • Lead free DZR brass construction for durability and reliability

  • Use to connect to any combination of copper, PEX, CPVC or PE-RT pipes

  • Innovative push-to-connect design makes for quick and easy installation

I used these recently for tapping in to existing copper pipes when installing a laundry sink. A bit expensive but works great for small DIY projects when you don't want to buy any special tools.

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3 hours ago, earthdome said:

A bit expensive

I am wondering why not use old fashioned compression fittings which are just a bit more than the soldered kind and you only need a wrench to tighten

https://www.grainger.ca/en/product/p/FAR62-10

 

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18 hours ago, Tommy T. said:

:SugarwareZ-037:)

 

By the way, HK the Stiebel Eltron heaters are wonderful. So much better and reliable water temperature than the Voda model at the apartment. Thanks for the recommendation! I am loving having hot water at the kitchen tap for dishwashing and even hand washing - it just feels cleaner to me.

Happy to read this Tommy, myself and from memory HK both recommended these. Reliable and not expensive. 

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I learned the hard way about the plumbers that work inside the resort where I have an apartment. My sink drainage started leaking so as I was near figured I'd repair what should be a 5 minute job.  I'd previously paid for new pipe work, all simple screw compression fittings.  Looking under the sink I was met by different sized pipe work joined with a mass of what looked like concrete. I checked the other sinks out and sure enough he'd got a job lot of cement. 

I tried to explain to my caretaker who supervised it that the pipework paid for had simple joints that pushed together, then by tightening the screwthreads compressed a rubber seal which prevented leaks. If the sink got blocked just unscrew them, pull them apart, clear the blockage and rescrew them together again. I was met by a blank look. Lots of chiselling later I got the pipes apart and there were no screw fittings to be seen. I asked the caretaker where they were and she produced a bag of bits from a tool cupboard. The plumber had told her he never needed them as the cement will stop leaks. 

They were carrying out repairs in all the apartments so I had a quick look inside a few, sure enough every sink was cemented. :571c66d400c8c_1(103):

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7 minutes ago, Snowy79 said:

I learned the hard way about the plumbers that work inside the resort where I have an apartment. My sink drainage started leaking so as I was near figured I'd repair what should be a 5 minute job.  I'd previously paid for new pipe work, all simple screw compression fittings.  Looking under the sink I was met by different sized pipe work joined with a mass of what looked like concrete. I checked the other sinks out and sure enough he'd got a job lot of cement. 

I tried to explain to my caretaker who supervised it that the pipework paid for had simple joints that pushed together, then by tightening the screwthreads compressed a rubber seal which prevented leaks. If the sink got blocked just unscrew them, pull them apart, clear the blockage and rescrew them together again. I was met by a blank look. Lots of chiselling later I got the pipes apart and there were no screw fittings to be seen. I asked the caretaker where they were and she produced a bag of bits from a tool cupboard. The plumber had told her he never needed them as the cement will stop leaks. 

They were carrying out repairs in all the apartments so I had a quick look inside a few, sure enough every sink was cemented. :571c66d400c8c_1(103):

And of course we all know the next time you are away and there is a leak the joints will be cemented again.  :angry:

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