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4 hours ago, Mike J said:

 Paint is one of those things where you almost always "get what you pay for".  I do not like to paint, so I try to buy the best and most long lasting paint so I don't have to repaint so often.

I'll second that!  Here, there seems to be a much wider range of paints thus a greater variation in quality.  i made the mistake (twice but that's another story) of buying a brand that I though was another due to the names being similar (Sun and Rain v Rain or Shine) - it was a disaster and I needed 6 coats where 3 would normally be sufficient.  I would say never again, but I only went and made the same mistake again for exactly the same reason - dumbass! 

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More excellent advice! Thanks so much, Mike!

I will follow your suggestions especially regarding paint. I also believe that you get what you pay for - usually... I am a very lazy guy so just want to do a project once, not many times as a career...

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6 hours ago, Gary D said:

My immediate concern with plaster board was moisture and leaks. Until the conversation I wasn't aware that plaster board was available here. Our current ceilings where narra but a couple of sheets bubbled once the varnish was applied. That ceiling was replaced later on, the rest have been there for nearly 20 years. The new ceiling is the more traditional painted design.

IMG_20191004_091107.jpg

How are these made or hung.

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6 hours ago, Mike J said:

Hardiflex comes in different thickness, 4.5mm, 6mm, 9mm depending on the application.  You can actually bend some of the thinner stuff if you have curves in walls or ceiling.  I agree about the texture collecting dust and also spider webs.  I usually paint walls with semi-gloss.  The flat gets dirty easily and is a bitch to try and clean, dirt seems to actually penetrate the paint.  I have never cared for a gloss finish, just a personal preference.  So semi-gloss is kind of a compromise for me.   The exception to this is the CR where I do use gloss enamel, where there is no tile, because of the moisture and need to wipe down walls to prevent mildew.  Anything other than gloss does not seem to hold up to frequent cleaning.  Paint is one of those things where you almost always "get what you pay for".  I do not like to paint, so I try to buy the best and most long lasting paint so I don't have to repaint so often.

Seems like flat just collects dirt..especially hand prints. We use gloss enamel for all of the rooms except the kitchen. Oil based paint there, especially around the stove lasts for years.:thumbsup: 

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57 minutes ago, stevewool said:

How are these made or hung.

I think it's just a 3d timber framework with ply sheets. The photo can misleading, the grey outer is the ceiling and the white inner is inset by about 8 inches.

Edited by Gary D
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2 hours ago, stevewool said:

How are these made or hung.

I believe it's called a tray ceiling - you can search online 

Funny Store - In my wife's family place, they showed the contractor a picture of a tray ceiling (not unlike the one in the pic above) and asked him to make.  He made it the wrong way i.e. it's convex and not concave!  When i saw the picture I could see how it could happen - without contex i.e. a light fitting etc, it was an optical illusion.  Of course, i kept quiet when they complained that the contractor was at fault rather than them for using a dud picture!  

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1 hour ago, Gary D said:

The photo can misleading

Haha - if you see my post above that is exactly what went wrong in my wife's place!  

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20 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

In many cases, in Canada anyway, the one who tapes and finishes the ceiling will put some kind of stipple effect on it as it is extremely hard to give the ceiling a perfect look.  It is possible they could do a better job in the Philippines :hystery:

Why not do the same stipple effect over your hardiflex?  Or is texture coat the same as stipple?

Hmmm, not sure I ever noticed anything on the ceilings in the U.S.  Seemed to be as smooth as the walls but I guess if you stare at them long enough on a sleepless night, you will see something. :hystery:

On my ceilings, they just mixed some sand or something into the paint.  Maybe it was that Artex stuff Kuya John mentioned.  In the U.S. we had some stuff my construction friends referred to as "popcorn" ceiling and it was sprayed on.  It was much thicker and could hide more defects.

Here is what mine looks like.  Actually I'm happy with it in most places.  They used a patch on the seams and sanded, before this. I think the hardiflex is only 1/4 inch.

20191004_221227 2.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, OnMyWay said:

Here is what mine looks like.  Actually I'm happy with it in most places.  They used a patch on the seams and sanded, before this. I think the hardiflex is only 1/4 inch.

20191004_221227 2.jpg

 

That looks like something that I am familiar with.  You add quite a bit of white sand to your drywall mud.  You also have to add water to thin out the mixture as you add the sand.  You then wad up a loose ball of paper about the size of a softball or maybe a bit larger.  You then take a piece of heavy plastic film, and place the paper ball in the center of the plastic.  Twist the plastic so now you have a loose ball of paper, wrapped in plastic, and the twisted part will act as a handle.  Dip the ball in the mud/sand mix and push it against the ceiling, repeat in a random pattern, but leave spaces between the mud that is being applied.  At this point it will look like crap.  Don't worry, magic is about to happen.  Before it begins to dry, use a smooth float to knock down and flatten the messy looking splotches.  Do areas of about 10 -12 square feet at a time.  Now it looks great.   If you want better than great, first paint the ceiling white then do the mud/sand treatment.  The mud/sand in addition to having a different texture, will also have a slightly different color.  I really like this kind of ceiling treatment, subtle, attractive, and doesn't collect a lot of dirt and webs.  This is one of those things you might want to practice first on some scrap materials.   Not difficult at all, but it requires just a little practice to get the right touch.

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20 hours ago, Mike J said:

The flat gets dirty easily and is a bitch to try and clean, dirt seems to actually penetrate the paint.  I have never cared for a gloss finish, just a personal preference.  So semi-gloss is kind of a compromise for me.   The exception to this is the CR where I do use gloss enamel, where there is no tile, because of the moisture and need to wipe down walls to prevent mildew.  Anything other than gloss does not seem to hold up to frequent cleaning.  Paint is one of those things where you almost always "get what you pay for".  I do not like to paint, so I try to buy the best and most long lasting paint so I don't have to repaint so often.

Very true about flat interior paint.  Some of the cheaper varieties will even wash off the walls with minimal scrubbing!  We had a paint finish in the US that was between Flat and Semi-Gloss called Eggshell which was the most popular paint finish.  Very durable but with a low sheen.  I don't know if it is available here in the Philippines.  

High moisture areas and areas subject to frequent cleanings should be painted in either Semi-Gloss or Gloss.  In general the higher the sheen the more durable the paint.

"You get what you pay for" is generally true when it comes to paint with a few exceptions, such as Sherwin-Williams brand being on of the exceptions.  Their pricing scheme is to support the contractors and rape the consumer/DIYer.

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