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PAL flight looses Starboard engine on take off


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A fully loaded 777 lost it's starboard engine on takeoff from LAX bound for MNL. Was able to turn around and safely land.

https://ktla.com/2019/11/21/plane-safely-returns-to-lax-after-experiencing-mechanical-problem-shortly-after-takeoff/

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First thoughts:  Maintenance problem or aircraft failure? Those planes have a long way to go with only two engines.  Fortunately the pilot was not an ex-jeepney driver or he would have tried to g

Designed to be that way.  The thrust available on one engine on all twin jet airliners is sufficient to  safely get airborne after V1, even at max all up weight. Any competent pilot should be able to

although that is true in terms of the regulation, a B777 neo, indeed any of the variants of that aircraft,   can fly unrestricted by time, on one engine, provided of course that it has the fuel to do

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12 minutes ago, intrepid said:

I figured they could fly on one engine but to take off fully loaded with only one engine is amazing.

Could they fly over the Pacific with only one engine? I doubt it.

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7 minutes ago, jimeve said:

Could they fly over the Pacific with only one engine? I doubt it.

Actually, I am positive they can. They are designed to have plenty of extra power available to fly on one engine.When cruising at altitude, they do not use nearly as much power as at take-off.  What would happen if they were 1,000 miles from the nearest airfield? It's not preferred, but no choice but to continue on.

However I don't know if they could actually take off fully loaded on one engine - that would be a real challenge.

If an engine fails on the Boeing 777, how does it affect the performance of the airplane ?

Just found this online:

http://www.askcaptainlim.com/flying-on-the-boeing-777-flying-91/471-could-the-boeing-777-fly-on-one-engine.html

Although engine failure is extremely rare, it is not a major problem should one of them ever failed. The Boeing 777 is designed to fly for at least 3 hours on one engine for a distance up to 1320 nautical miles or 2110 kilometers. That is further than from New York to Havana in Cuba.

Pilots have been checked every 6 months in even more adverse emergency conditions than just a simple engine failure. Basically, an engine failure merely require a diversion to a suitable airport and there are many such airports within the 3 hours range. However, most Airlines at the moment use 2 hours for planning purposes, to fly on one engine should the need arise for an unforeseen diversion. So if an engine fails within 850 nautical miles (2 hours flight) of your intended destination, you may even arrive safely at your airport without any sweat !

Hello Capt Lim,

I read your comments about flying with one engine. I was on a Newark- Denver on a B777 yesterday that had the left engine failed on the takeoff roll. We were just getting started so it was no biggie, but I wonder what might happen if we were past the point of stopping in time?

Thanks,

Bill

Hi Bill,

This is a good question. All pilots have been trained to recognize at least three important speeds prior to take off, namely V1, VR and V2 .

V1 is the take off decision speed whereby if the take off is continued after an engine failure, it will be possible to continue the take off safely. It is also the speed whereby, if the Captain abandoned the take off, it will be possible to bring the aircraft to a safe stop within the remaining Runway.

VR is the rotation speed where the Captain begins to rotate the aircraft to lift off attitude and climb away safely.

V2 is the Take Off Safety and Initial Climb Speed to achieve a certain height at a certain distance.

I would not like to bore you with further related technicalities but your question was, what might happen if you were past the point of stopping in time? Well you are then above the V1 Speed (if I interpret your question correctly) and the Captain's decision is to continue the take off without any problem. He has to make a quick decision either to go or no-go. ' Go' means continue after V1 and 'no-go' means abort the take off before V1.

The Captain in the B777 you referred to must have aborted the take-off before V1 and he was very sure he could stop within the remaining Runway. So he would not have the problem of not stopping in time. If he had made a bad decision that would not allow him to stop in time, (depending on the length of the Runway), it would we quite disastrous.

Anyway, the B777 is a very safe and comfortable aircraft to fly as a passenger and all B777 pilots are checked on handling engine failures and aborted take offs every six months.

I hope I have answered your question. Have a safe flight always !

Hi Capt Lim.

Thank you for a very interesting answer. So, a Boeing 777 CAN take off safely with only one engine then?

Thanks Bill

Hi Bill,

Just a small clarification.. You don't plan to take off with one engine.. you only continue to take off with one engine, PROVIDED the aircraft speed has passed V1 (about 145 to 180 mph, depending on weight of aircraft) after an engine failure.

Edited by Tommy T.
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5 minutes ago, jimeve said:

Could they fly over the Pacific with only one engine? I doubt it.

If they were half way over when they lost the engine they'd have no choice Jim! No doubt if the pilot was Irish he'd decide to turn around and head back! 

 

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7 minutes ago, Tommy T. said:

Actually, I am positive they can. They are designed to have plenty of extra power available to fly on one engine.When cruising at altitude, they do not use nearly as much power as at take-off.  What would happen if they were 1,000 miles from the nearest airfield? It's not preferred, but no choice but to continue on.

However I don't know if they could actually take off fully loaded on one engine - that would be a real challenge.

 

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3 minutes ago, hk blues said:

If they were half way over when they lost the engine they'd have no choice Jim! No doubt if the pilot was Irish he'd decide to turn around and head back! 

 

I never said halfway. please read again.

 

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2 minutes ago, jimeve said:

would they turn around and fly back or continue hoping  the other engine don't fail

 That Jim, would depend on the nearest available landing Area, if it is near to a safe area I would think they would go one as many times there would be a point of no Return :thumbsup:

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I have actually sat in the cockpit of a 777 landing in Dominican republic. What a great experience.

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