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Second hand farm impliments wanted for cash !!


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Hi there guy's, I am looking to buy second hand farm machinery and impliments, do any of you have some for sale or know a second hand dealer who is worth approaching for a bulk buy ?? 

I am most interested in Chisel Ploughs for Sugar Cane, Rotarvators, Trailers, Ferliliser Spreaders, Corn Planters and Corn Harvester. All need to fit my 90hp Tractor. 

 

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10 minutes ago, John Chamberlain said:

Hi there guy's, I am looking to buy second hand farm machinery and impliments,

 Now John, is about the right time to get a request out on the various FB for sale sites

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John, your photographs bring back a flood of memories.  My father had purchased an International Harvester tractor for the farm and people came from great distances because they had never seen one.  Most farmers used a water buffalo to pull a single plow.  As the tractor worked, there was always a flock of semi-feral chickens behind looking for worms and larvae exposed by the plowing.  

 

A few years later, the tractor was gone.  It was replaced by six men working with water buffalos.  His rationale was employing out of work farmers was more important than efficiency.  

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3 hours ago, JJReyes said:

A few years later, the tractor was gone.  It was replaced by six men working with water buffalos.  His rationale was employing out of work farmers was more important than efficiency.  

My wife has a farm, and over the last couple of years it has been more difficult to find farm workers despite paying higher than normal wages. Many of the farm laborers have moved to the construction industry. I can’t say as I blame them, it’s a sign of the times!

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10 hours ago, Huggybearman said:

My wife has a farm, and over the last couple of years it has been more difficult to find farm workers despite paying higher than normal wages. Many of the farm laborers have moved to the construction industry. I can’t say as I blame them, it’s a sign of the times!

My nostalgia dates back from more than 50 years ago.  The situation and conditions have changed.  I was stunned to learn, while visiting UP Los Banos for a conference on agricultural-tourism, that a career in agriculture has been declining during the past 15 years.  There is no money in it.  The career goals today is focused on technology related industries.  As you stated, farm laborers have move to the construction industry.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/5/2020 at 12:12 AM, Huggybearman said:

My wife has a farm, and over the last couple of years it has been more difficult to find farm workers despite paying higher than normal wages. Many of the farm laborers have moved to the construction industry. I can’t say as I blame them, it’s a sign of the times!

My inlaws own some small rice fields but can no longer find anyone willing to do the work to plant them.

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1 hour ago, earthdome said:

My inlaws own some small rice fields but can no longer find anyone willing to do the work to plant them.

I am not quite sure what that entails here re planting methods. On different videos I see different methods, depending on the country and possibly many other factors of which i am unaware. 

There are large fice fields throughout the province, but near my house where I have watched the process now for many years are only small rice fields. 

What I see is the first tilling (last few weeks now that heavy rains have softened the field soils) to rough plow the field leaving a  mixture of turf and old growth. This is done by contract by a man with a walk behind motorized tiller you see on sale at the agribusiness shops. The land sits awhile. When the heavier rains muck things up, the field is plowed again once or twice until the old growth is driven under for green fertilizer, I believe.  Then a carabao is brought in with a beam leveler to flatten the area. It becomes a muddy flat surface.

Now here is the part that for some reason I have always missed witnessing..... the actual seeding. What I do know is that I do NOT see rows of workers planting young seedlings by hand here. I see that in other videos, but not here. The fields must be broadcast sown or walking seed scattered with a carried mechanism. I don't really know. But a few weeks after leveling..... the fields start greening with the new crop.  I did see a fellow hand planting some young seedlings on a few bare spots that weren't seeded for some reason. This was done the traditional way, but I have never witnessed teams of seedling planters here close to my house. I have seen it while traveling outside the immediate area enroute to distant places.

When the fields are ready for harvest, small contract teams of hand reapers cut and lay it, and a small thresher is brought into the field, with sieves and a blower fan. The palay is sacked and taken away and everyone disappears. The harvesting is done very quickly with not very many people. Again, these are small plots.

From what I see here around me, it does not seem labor intensive, but that may only apply to these very small, semi-urban plots.

I would like to learn more if anyone on the forum owns and oversees larger fields. I will have to ask some of my expat friends whose wives own fields nearby. The subject never comes up, so my curiosity is tweaked.

Occasionally I see someone spraying, either pesticides or fertilizer.... but they are expensive and not always used as in richer countries.

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