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Mike J

4 officials tagged in alleged PhilHealth scam get promotion

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Jollygoodfellow said:

Following a Cebu City councilor’s move to declare him persona non grata, or a person that is no longer welcome in a particular area, Sieczka apologized via another video he posted online.

Probably why libel charges are for residents only; everyone else they can just deport.

Edited by Shady
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3 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

It has been taken by the courts to mean if you hurt someones feelings with something you said then it it libel. 

That would be slander. Libel is defamation by written word. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Shady said:

Unless they wrote their own dictionary with a complete misunderstanding of legal terms...if it's true, by definition it's not libel. Truth is a defense to all defamation (libel, slander) claims.

 

The problem with the theorectical definition of Libel (even in some first world countries) is that the burden of proof lies upon the person accused of libel (or indeed slander).

ie The person (or entity) making the statement needs to have substantial evidence that it is true and this has resulted in a number of news papers and TV networks around the world losing court cases.

 

Edited by GeoffH
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1 hour ago, GeoffH said:

substantial evidence that it is true

 In the Philippines neither matters, It is the Fact that it has been Said and or written, :tiphat: 

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4 hours ago, GeoffH said:

 

The problem with the theorectical definition of Libel (even in some first world countries) is that the burden of proof lies upon the person accused of libel (or indeed slander).

ie The person (or entity) making the statement needs to have substantial evidence that it is true and this has resulted in a number of news papers and TV networks around the world losing court cases.

 

True, although in the Philippines "Corporations cannot be charged with criminal defamation" which isn't surprising.

And it's a criminal charge, not a civil charge, which is also really odd:
 

Quote

 

The United Nations Human Rights Committee ruled in 2012 that the libel law of one country, the Philippines, was inconsistent with Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights as well as urging that "State parties should consider the decriminalization of libel"

A notable characteristic of these crimes under Philippine law is the specification that they apply to imputations both real and imaginary.

Professor Harry Roque of the University of the Philippines has written that under this law, electronic libel is punished with imprisonment from 6 years and one day to up to 12 years. As of 30 September 2012, five petitions claiming the law to be unconstitutional had been filed with the Philippine Supreme Court, one by Senator Teofisto Guingona III. The petitions all claim that the law infringes on freedom of expression, due process, equal protection and privacy of communication. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defamation#Philippines

 

 

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On 6/20/2020 at 7:50 AM, Mike J said:

I will not comment on this because of the internet libel laws except to say that I do not whether to laugh or cry.

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1294554/4-officials-tagged-in-alleged-philhealth-scam-get-promotion

 

 

This is when I say, 'only in the Philippines'.

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