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Cast Iron Frying Pans


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3 hours ago, hk blues said:

Genuine question here - is it really worth all the effort i.e. what is the big advantage over a "normal" pan?

Check this out, HK:

https://www.thekitchn.com/why-the-cast-iron-skillet-is-the-key-to-better-one-pan-cooking-233944

>One-pan cooking is everywhere these days — from one-pan pastas to sheet-pan meals. We are all trying to avoid washing multiple pans after dinner each night. A large cast iron skillet has been my secret to one-pan cooking since long before the one-pan cooking craze. The reasons are simple and straightforward.

Cast Iron Skillets Heat Evenly

Cast iron is a very dense metal, making it nearly impervious to damage and the king of holding on to heat. Even heating means that meats brown better and vegetables cook faster without having to constantly manage the heat source or rotate pans in the oven. Cast iron is ideal for frying and baking because it holds and distributes heat so well. The same cannot be said of your favorite pasta pot or baking sheet.

Strong and Sturdy: What Makes Cast Iron So Great?

Cast Iron Can Go from Stovetop to Oven

One-pan pastas rely solely on stovetop heat, while sheet-pan meals use only the oven, but one-pan cast iron cooking gives the best of both worlds. Brown chicken in the skillet on the stovetop, then add onions, potatoes, and carrots to the skillet and place the whole thing in a warm oven and you’ve got a complete meal from one pan. You can sear, roast, and even simmer in a cast iron skillet. Not all pans can claim that.

Cast Iron Is Naturally Nonstick

A well-seasoned cast iron skillet has a naturally nonstick surface. Few nonstick pans can go safely from the stovetop to the oven. Because cast iron is naturally nonstick, it is also easy to clean.

Cleaning Cast Iron Is Easy

Sometimes cast iron skillets get a bad rap for being kind of needy. Sure, you can’t clean a cast iron pan the way you clean nonstick or stainless steel pans, but a cast iron skillet is one of the rare things that actually gets better when you use it more. Regular use and cleaning of a cast iron skillet improves the skillet “seasoning” (a thin layer of polymerized fat that seals the iron) that makes it nonstick.<

Couldn't have said it better nor more concise than that!

I used two in USA for many years - a larger one for larger needs and a small one for doing small batches like omelettes, sauteed mushrooms and onions and stuff like that. The article quoted above does not mention what I loved to do was to put various cooked dishes into the oven under the broiler to finish off the top, like melt cheese or brown things. Today, on Master Chef, they just use small blowtorches instead...

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This is for sale 10 miles from me in the US. Shall I inquire about price and put it in a balakbayan box for you?

Check this out, HK: https://www.thekitchn.com/why-the-cast-iron-skillet-is-the-key-to-better-one-pan-cooking-233944 >One-pan cooking is everywhere these days — from one-pan pastas to shee

On the other hand, if you smack an intruder with an aluminum frying pan, you hear a big "dong!", he turns around, and kills you. Good cast iron has a true ring to it when it contacts the skull, l

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2 hours ago, hk blues said:

Ours is nowhere near 7lbs - nearer 2lbs!  I'm thinking it's a steel alloy coated to look like cast iron.  To be fair to SM, I don't think they claimed it was cast iron.  Yep, it's hard to find a better quality wok here - probably the best bet would be some kind of specialist cookware store but they will be pricey.  

Knives too, I got a German Solingen chef knife back when SM had an imported cutlery shop on the ground floor, but that's been gone for years.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Shady said:

The biggest advantage is you don't fry, you grill.

 

I am contemplating trying to find something like that here too - again, with heavy cast iron.

However, we will have an outdoor "dirty kitchen" and barbecue so not sure how much we might need one. I never tried using a "grilling" pan, but they are strongly touted on cooking shows. Do you think they work as well as advertised or demonstrated? I am totally willing to give one a try if the price is right and it does the job they seem able to do...

Edit: By the way, we were able to find a really nice gas range that also has gas "grilling" (read: broiler) built in. I am really looking forward to using a broiler again for the first time in several years... Great for finishing off an omelette or quesadilla, or baked potato, or...or...or.... 

Edited by Tommy T.
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One thing to note for ppl who may not have ever used a cast iron pan, but are considering it. They are designed to be used over an open flame / gas burner type ranges. Thats not to say you can’t use it on an electric or glass top infrared type one. If you do, then extra time is needed to preheat the pan, never put a cold pan onto a hot burner (cold pan onto cold burner, then turn on the burner) or you risk cracking the pan. It’s also recommended to only use med-high heat and not high; especially on those coil type electric stoves as they don’t always heat evenly and create hot spots. 

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16 minutes ago, Gator said:

One thing to note for ppl who may not have ever used a cast iron pan, but are considering it. They are designed to be used over an open flame / gas burner type ranges. Thats not to say you can’t use it on an electric or glass top infrared type one. If you do, then extra time is needed to preheat the pan, never put a cold pan onto a hot burner (cold pan onto cold burner, then turn on the burner) or you risk cracking the pan. It’s also recommended to only use med-high heat and not high; especially on those coil type electric stoves as they don’t always heat evenly and create hot spots. 

Great point, Gator!

I really prefer gas to electric because it is instant on, instant off. Electric always caused me problems - maybe because I was not so good at planning ahead? With electric, I waited and waited and then - "Oh S**** it's too hot!" then removed it from the burner... Also, many pans that I have used do not have flat bottoms and so would not heat evenly on electric burners.

Don't get me wrong... I love using T-Fall or other non-stick pans often... But sometimes that old, heavy, cast-iron pan is just the ticket for certain dishes. So I really would prefer to have both in MY kitchen. (L is okay with it being MY kitchen, so long as she gets equal rights to it.) Of course, the dirty kitchen will often be her domain and I am also fine with that, so long as I get visitation privileges!:6:

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24 minutes ago, Tommy T. said:

Great point, Gator!

I really prefer gas to electric because it is instant on, instant off. Electric always caused me problems - maybe because I was not so good at planning ahead? With electric, I waited and waited and then - "Oh S**** it's too hot!" then removed it from the burner... Also, many pans that I have used do not have flat bottoms and so would not heat evenly on electric burners.

Don't get me wrong... I love using T-Fall or other non-stick pans often... But sometimes that old, heavy, cast-iron pan is just the ticket for certain dishes. So I really would prefer to have both in MY kitchen. (L is okay with it being MY kitchen, so long as she gets equal rights to it.) Of course, the dirty kitchen will often be her domain and I am also fine with that, so long as I get visitation privileges!:6:

Totally agree - one of the main criteria when I was looking for an apartment there was that it was allowed to have a gas cooktop. Much harder to control the heat on an electric stove......a pot of pasta either boiled over or you couldn’t get it to simmer......frying something (like fish), either burn it or wait for ever for something to cook. 

Non-stick pans have their place, but IMHO there is no substitute for a well seasoned cast iron frying pan. I’ve never tried a rectangular cast iron grill pan, but do plan on getting one there or likely bring one as I can get them here for much less (Lodge outlet store in TN, I pass by there often)  

Equal rights in the kitchen? My take on that in MY kitchen.....I cook, she cleans! 🤣🤪🤣

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29 minutes ago, Gator said:

Equal rights in the kitchen? My take on that in MY kitchen.....I cook, she cleans! 🤣🤪🤣

Hmmm... I cook, she cleans? Then maybe I sleep alone... It depends on how much cooking verses how much cleaning... Of course I will help her cleaning if I make a big mess...

 

We really do share responsibilities - if she cooks, I clean... but she must cook "responsibly" - i. e. no huge rice overruns or other super messes... she must deal with them... 

We are still adjusting to each other's cooking abilities and techniques. But it is working out... some fine tuning required here and there...

Edited by Tommy T.
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2 hours ago, Shady said:

Knives too, I got a German Solingen chef knife back when SM had an imported cutlery shop on the ground floor, but that's been gone for years.

 

 

Best to keep those away from the wife too!

16c8y4.jpg

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My wife and I have an agreement regarding kitchen duties - she cooks, I eat!  I've lived alone on and off for various reasons in the past so I can cook but I'll admit I don't enjoy it.  Fair play to those who enjoy it.    

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