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Do you have a plan in place for medical emergency's?


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12 hours ago, jpbago said:

If one has been out of country for 3 years, are they covered immediately upon returning?

In Canada, we are not covered for the 1st 3 months upon returning.

Yes a similar situation exists with Australian expats returning to Australia after an extended absence (they will treat you but you'll get a bill if you're not covered and there is a waiting period after return).

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Was explaining to my wife, I thought it would be selfish of me, knowing I had a terminal illness and kept trying to get treated.  I also do not want to extend the misery and drain resources for my wif

I live Moalboal about two to three hours from the closest "real" hospital.  If I have a heart attack my plan is to die.    I do have a credit card with a very large credit limit in case of accidents/i

I have only Phil-health and a credit-card just in case. Anyway St Peters funeral is on route to the hospitals if I don't make it that far.

On 11/25/2020 at 3:42 AM, Philippine Paul said:

Then, it may be to your benefit, to sign-up for alternative medical care to help defray the cost of any medical bills that you may encumber. Additionally, it's highly suggested by other Expat Groups, that you maintain at a minimum $3,000 in a U.S. Dollar Philippine Bank Account for any type of Emergencies that may arise.  Hopefully, your "significant other" is listed as a Joint Account Holder, so she'll be able to withdraw funds to pay your final bill upon checkout from the Medical Care Facility.  Personally, I wouldn't want to have that much money stashed away in your home, as it's a clear invitation to would-be burglars, to snatch those funds and, never see it again.  The other option is to have a High Limit Credit Card with a low APR (like we also have) so, we are ready for whatever type of emergency situation that may arise.  Please note, it's a 30-minute drive to the nearest hospital, so you may wish to have someone that car provide emergency transportation to the nearest and best Medical Care Facility that you hope to seek Medical Care at. It has been discussed in the past on other Expat and Veteran Sites, that if you are lucky to get an ambulance, you will most likely be dead by the time you reach the hospital.

Hey Paul... You offer some good suggestions that I believe not everyone considers.

At least in our case - and many others, from what I have been reading here - funding the service one may require is secondary to accessing that service. There are a few clinics between our home and the big hospitals in the city but, judging from appearances, I think anyone going in would come out in worse shape than at admittance. For us it is at least 30 minutes to the nearest quality care and up to an hour or more if traffic is thick.

So, as Snowy and RBM post, I agree that trying to stay healthy in the first place seems to be the best plan. Living some distance from good care is a risk we are willing to live with at this time. I do miss the feelings of being immortal back a few decades ago!

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On 11/23/2020 at 6:16 PM, Tommy T. said:

Hi Paul...

Perhaps I am missing the point of the OP original post.. and it definitly would not be the first time...

I am seeing it as more - what happens or what do you do when the s*** hits the fan when or if you are home alone or with your significant other?

Whether you are or not a military or former military veteran...If you or I get sick, we may need attention... simple and plain to me...

One of the things to take into perspective is that I am not young.  I am a Vietnam Era Veteran in my 70s who is 100% Disabled (primarily by Agent Orange).  Thus, even though I am covered for my Service-Connected Disabilities (if I were living in Manila close to a Foreign Medical Program (FMP) Approved Hospital), I am not, as I reside outside a small town (Clarin) in Misamis Occidental...a 30-minute drive North of Ozamiz City when the traffic is barely non-existent.

So, there are only two hospitals that are considered "certified" by the U.S. Government, that I can use.  One of these hospitals, is not where I would wish to use, as to me, it doesn't meet the standards that I am used to in the U.S. (meaning no towels in the bathroom, no toilet seat, no soap, water on the floor, broken faucets, etc. etc. etc.  Whereas with the other hospital, I have been treated at multiple times and even was admitted into in January 2020, when I was misdiagnosed with something other than what I had...namely the Shingles Virus.  Yet, the treatment was exemplary and the fee was reasonable. My daughter-in-law (who accompanies both my wife and I every where), mentioned to the staff that I was a Senior Citizen, showing them my ACR-I Card and, I was immediately provided a 10% discount at time of check-out.  This hospital (to me) is as close as you can come to what we know U.S. Hospitals are like.

However, while requiring Cancer Surgery for my 5th Basal Cell Carcinoma (this time on my skull), I was referred by my Dermatologist at Cebu Doctor's University Hospital to have my surgery performed at The Medical City (TMC) Hospital in Pasig City.  WOW! Was I shocked to see that this hospital was just like any U.S. Hospital that I have had to stay in.  It was exceptionally clean and my wife was allowed to sleep in the same room as I did.  If I ever needed any type of surgery that was not an immediate medical emergency, this is where I wished to have my surgery performed. 

We visit Cebu every year for my wife's Annual Medical Checkup at Chong Hua Cebu City Hospital and, I like the cleanliness of this hospital (as I also like Cebu Doctor's University Hospital.  I believe that if anyone that is living in Cebu, might want to use either of these two fine hospitals too.

I can't speak for any other hospitals / medical care facilities but, I might be best for you to check around wherever you are residing and, decide which hospital is best for you.  As mentioned in my earlier post, it's advisable to have at a minimum $3,000 or a credit card with high credit limit, handy to pay the hospital bill.  However, after noticing that you are Canadian, you won't get any refund back like us Military Retirees and, then as mentioned, it might be best to sign-up for Alternative Health Care Insurance (as I described in my previous message) to further defray the cost.  I have both PhilHealth and Caritas Health Shield, trying not to have to use Tricare (Military Medical Insurance) as much as I can.

However, to sum up this message, I know that there are certain medical conditions that I wouldn't want to be treated for...namely Cancer, as my former spouse (South Korean-American) of 23-years (and an Operating Room Surgical Nurse) was diagnosed in late June 2002 with Stage-4 Ovarian Cancer.  After having numerous surgeries, multiple (more than I can count on both hands) Chemotherapy Appointments (which didn't work) and, then went on to Radiation Appointments (which didn't work), the cancer within her, had full control of her body and I lost her after a long 4-year battle.  So, to me, Chemotherapy and Radiation Treatments, just extends a persons life out for an unknown period of time, until The Good Lord is ready to take you Home to be with Him.  I wouldn't wish this same ordeal to happen to my best friend and I certainly wouldn't want to go through a similar ordeal.  Her last 3-months were spent at home with a Hospice Nurse and Physician seeing her several times a week.  My children and I (to include my wife's two S. Korean Sisters that visited us from S. Korea to help with the care of their eldest sister...my wife), kept her sedated with morphine...which to me, is the only way to be taken care of at home, until it's time for you to pass away.  Otherwise, if you have the money to travel back to Canada (or wherever anyone who is reading this message is from), I would highly suggest that you return back to your home country, fully expecting to receive the kind of medical treatment that you can expect to receive and have your Medical Insurance Company that you have, pay the exorbitant medical expenses, until such time as you are healed or, pass away.

 

 
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22 hours ago, jimeve said:

Never knew that. Is that on top of using Phil-health?

A little intrigued here also Jim....Senior Citizen to means Citizen......none of us I understand are citizens so perhaps its dependent on the interpretation of the person receiving the payment.

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1 hour ago, GeoffH said:

Yes a similar situation exists with Australian expats returning to Australia after an extended absence (they will treat you but you'll get a bill if you're not covered and there is a waiting period after return).

Interesting and something I shall look into as usually there is a similarity between the 2 countries with these rulings , At least  Aussie Centi Link is far less stringent with  residency requirements (regarding state pension) compared to NZ. From my knowledge in NZ there is no restriction regarding waiting time one a citizen is in NZ after a prolonged absence. Still to be treated immediately it must pretty well be a life threatening situation, if one if after a hip replacement the list goes for ever and ever. 

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RBM,

Here in the Philippines, anyone (be it a foreigner or a Filipino) that is Age 60 and older, is referred to as a Senior Citizen and, thus if you have an Alien Certification Registration - Identification (ACR-I) Card, that indicates that you are either a Permanent Resident of the Philippines or are on an Extended Tourist Visa (Tourist Visas normally are only good for 30-days, however, upon your first entry into the Philippines, you can indicate to the Bureau of Immigration (BI) Authorities at whatever international airport that you arrived at (meaning NAIA (Manila); Cebu-Mactan or, Davao) that you wish to stay on an extended visa (meaning up to but no more than 3-years), you are then required to pay the fees for however long you wish to say and are issued an ACR-I Card that reflects your Visa Status.  However, at the end of your time spent here in the Philippines (maximum allowable time for a Tourist Visa is 3-years), you'll have to depart the Philippines for whatever destination you decided to visit for a period of 24- to 48-hours and, then can re-enter back into the Philippines, once again asking for an Extended Tourist Visa and, once again going through the aforementioned steps as I previously mentioned.

Now I do know for certain, that there are certain Australian Regulations that need to be met and, yet I have a relative of mind (grandmother of my daughter-in-law and an Australian-Filipino Citizen) who was happily married to an Australian for a long time before he passed away and, she is only allowed to remain here in the Philippines for no more than 6-months, before she is required to return back to Australia.  I also know another close Australian friend, married to a Filipino for more than 35-years (having houses both in Ozamiz City and wherever they reside in Australia), where they stay in Ozamiz City for no longer than 6-months and, then 6-months back in Australia.  Yet, I have an exceptionally close Australian Friend of Mine (Retired Australian Air Force) and he and his Australian-Filipino Spouse permanently reside here in the Philippines and, he receives his full retirement pension.  So, it seems to me (for whatever reason), that the law differs between one Australian and another Australian and, this might require yourself to do some research at your end).

However, anyone that is from any other country (other than the U.S., as we Americans that are married to Filipinos / Philippine-Americans (meaning Dual Citizens like my spouse) and, applied for a Permanent Resident Visa (either a 13A or 13G), we are allowed to stay indefinitely here in the Philippines, until such time as either we pass away or our Filipina / Philippine-American Spouse passes away.  At such time, we then will have to denounce our Permanent Resident Status and, switch to either an Extended Tourist Visa or can apply for a Special Resident Retiree Visa (SRRV), that will allow us to remain permanently in the Philippines until we too pass away (or, as it was prior to the Pandemic, you can freely depart the Philippines, remaining outside the Philippines for an indefinite period of time and, then could re-enter back into the Philippines to stay as long as you wish). With the Pandemic in-place now, if you have an SRRV and choose to leave the Philippines, you will NOT be allowed to re-enter back into the Philippines, until such time as the BI allows those foreigners that have an SRRV or wish to obtain a Tourist Visa, back into the Philippines.  However, those of us that have the 13A and 13G Permanent Resident Visas, are still allowed to freely depart and re-enter back into the Philippines if accompanied by our Philippine / Philippine-American Spouses.  (NOTE: Those foreigners that are NOT Retired Military are expected to pay as much as $50,000 for an SRRV, where as we Retired Military have a specially discounted SRRV which costs $1500 for the SRRV and, have to pay to the Philippine Retirement Authority an additional $1400, which will be deposited by the PRA in a financial institution of their choosing until such time, as we wish to purchase a condo or depart back to wherever we wish to go, without any plans of moving back to the Philippines.)  As for me, I am on a 13A Permanent Resident Visa and, my Philippine-American Spouse and I own our own home. (NOTE: Foreigners aren't allowed to physically own property but, they can own a Condo which is a unit within a large building consisting of numerous condos, owned by a Filipino.) Additionally, many children of the Filipino / Philippine-American Spouse (who passes away), will automatically seize the property where there Filipina / Philippine-American Spouse resides and, can evict the foreigner off the property in as little as 90-days. However, in my situation, since my Philippine-American Spouse was widowed (as I was too), her two sons stated that I am the only Father that they have ever known (their Dad passed away when both of them were 1 and 3-years old respectively and, they have no memory of their Dad, other than a photo of him sitting on a table in the younger son's home), that I can remain on the property as long as I wish, until I too die and, then can be buried next to their mom.  Then at that time, they will inherit the property and retain it for however long that they wish...which as they said, will remain in their family forever.

So, to sum up this rather long message, please check with whatever countries that you are originated from, as to how long you are allowed to reside here in the Philippines (whether single or, married to a Filipina or Dual Citizen) and, then you'll know what the parameters are for you to live and enjoy the Philippines for the rest (hopefully) of your lives.

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1 hour ago, Philippine Paul said:

Here in the Philippines, anyone (be it a foreigner or a Filipino) that is Age 60 and older, is referred to as a Senior Citizen

They may be referred to as such, however:

 

Quote

the “Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010, ” defines senior citizen or elderly as   any resident citizen of the Philippines at least 60  years old.

https://pia.gov.ph/features/articles/1026127

In the Philippines you are required to be a citizen to get all the benefits of being a senior citizen.  Feel free to quote Philippine government sites with refuting data.  Links are not required if the info can be copied and googled.

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6 hours ago, Philippine Paul said:

RBM,

Here in the Philippines, anyone (be it a foreigner or a Filipino) that is Age 60 and older, is referred to as a Senior Citizen and, thus if you have an Alien Certification Registration - Identification (ACR-I) Card, that indicates that you are either a Permanent Resident of the Philippines or are on an Extended Tourist Visa (Tourist Visas normally are only good for 30-days, however, upon your first entry into the Philippines, you can indicate to the Bureau of Immigration (BI) Authorities at whatever international airport that you arrived at (meaning NAIA (Manila); Cebu-Mactan or, Davao) that you wish to stay on an extended visa (meaning up to but no more than 3-years), you are then required to pay the fees for however long you wish to say and are issued an ACR-I Card that reflects your Visa Status. 

Now I do know for certain, that there are certain Australian Regulations that need to be met and, yet I have a relative of mind (grandmother of my daughter-in-law and an Australian-Filipino Citizen) who was happily married to an Australian for a long time before he passed away and, she is only allowed to remain here in the Philippines for no more than 6-months, before she is required to return back to Australia.  I also know another close Australian friend, married to a Filipino for more than 35-years (having houses both in Ozamiz City and wherever they reside in Australia), where they stay in Ozamiz City for no longer than 6-months and, then 6-months back in Australia.  Yet, I have an exceptionally close Australian Friend of Mine (Retired Australian Air Force) and he and his Australian-Filipino Spouse permanently reside here in the Philippines and, he receives his full retirement pension.  So, it seems to me (for whatever reason), that the law differs between one Australian and another Australian and, this might require yourself to do some research at your end).

 

Interesting, I was of view it is unwise to indicate to a BI official upon entry as a tourist that one wishes to stay longer on same visa. In fact may on this site have written about difficulty is the officer suspects same.

Maybe the laws have changed or my info is incorrect, my understanding is the ACI card can only be issued after one completes his first extension application, not upon entry, would be interesting as nice to complete all upon entry.

Regarding superannuation from Aussie and NZ. Both countries have strict residency requirements that must be met  before being eligible. NZ is far stricter in this regards. if eligible one can continue to drawer this benefit when abroad however  it is reduced. Not able to comment regarding Australia, could perhaps be similar.

 

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On 11/26/2020 at 8:00 AM, Philippine Paul said:

The Medical City (TMC) Hospital in Pasig City.  WOW! Was I shocked to see that this hospital was just like any U.S. Hospital that I have had to stay in.

The Medical City in Clark is also top notch.  I stayed there for 3 nights when I had shoulder surgery.  However, it is a 1 hour drive from our house so that makes it difficult in an emergency.  They take credit cards too, whereas some local hospitals do not.  When my kids were born at Lourdes Hospital, I had to put down a cash deposit.

Very sorry for the loss of your wife.  Was she treated here in the Philippines or some other place?

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On 11/26/2020 at 8:07 AM, RBM said:

A little intrigued here also Jim....Senior Citizen to means Citizen......none of us I understand are citizens so perhaps its dependent on the interpretation of the person receiving the payment.

Not sure about other countries, but in the UK we use the term senior citizen to describe people of retirement age - it's nothing to do with citizenship. 

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