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2 hours ago, jimeve said:

Breakers have only 15 amp for lights and the rest 20 amp. Would this be safe? Or do I need to buy a new panel?

For what it's worth, Jim, our panel in the new construction has all 20 amp breakers for lighting - and outlets - circuits and 30 for air/con circuits. I really am not certain about laundry or refrigerator circuits.

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Any decent electrician would have a live cable detector that he runs along the wall and follows the circuit until it stops. Taking into consideration that the circuit breaker doesn't keep tripping obv

There should be a MAIN breaker that controls the whole breaker box...  IF that breaker is open... everything would be OFF. Sometimes a tripped breaker looks like it's ON, just a tad below the ON posit

Yep...that's why we had to run another line to the box, we upgraded the breaker for an A/C unit and I insisted they also upgraded the wiring to match.  

2 hours ago, jimeve said:

Breakers have only 15 amp for lights and the rest 20 amp. Would this be safe? Or do I need to buy a new panel?

15 amps should be prefectly fine for a lighting circuit.  It's all down to the load and the quality of the wiring. In most modern houses LED lighting is normal which draws less power and is by far more efficient and last longer than standard bulbs. I wouldn't trust the wiring for a lighting circuit here above 15 amps, maybe in a major city where there are qualified electricians and access to quality materials but realistically if you have that many lights you will be seen from space. 

You can have two reals of wiring both looking identical but if you run 30 amps through both one will heat up and break down over time the other will last forever.

A usual kitchen ring will be 30 amps as the kettle, microwave and cooker can pull some higher amperages.

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Wiring, receptacles and circuit breakers should all be wired together for the same amperage. For example, if you change circuit breakers up from 20 to 30amps.... you should ensure the wiring AND receptacles match.  

Wiring reels might look identical.... but they should be clearly marked by gauge size and easily read... if they are not... I wouldn't use them.  The gauge of the wiring needed is based on the distance of the wiring run and amperage rating of the circuit.

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8 hours ago, Joey G said:

Wiring, receptacles and circuit breakers should all be wired together for the same amperage. For example, if you change circuit breakers up from 20 to 30amps.... you should ensure the wiring AND receptacles match.  

Wiring reels might look identical.... but they should be clearly marked by gauge size and easily read... if they are not... I wouldn't use them.  The gauge of the wiring needed is based on the distance of the wiring run and amperage rating of the circuit.

Yep...that's why we had to run another line to the box, we upgraded the breaker for an A/C unit and I insisted they also upgraded the wiring to match.  

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I started to explore some of the wiring in the first house we purchased here.  Ended up hiring a professional electrician to strip out and replace every bit of electrical service in the house.  The breaker box, every meter of wire, every switch, every receptacle.  We had them cut channels in the block walls, then run the new wire in flex conduit, then mortar and paint.  No problems since, surprised the house had not burned down the way the wiring had been cobbled together.  There is no way it could have passed any kind of inspection so it was either not inspected or someone was paid off. :sad:

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1 hour ago, Mike J said:

There is no way it could have passed any kind of inspection

I did the same and here is the funny thing.  It passed the inspection BEFORE I had an electrician totally rewire it.  I asked about it and was told that there is some kind of tax on the number of electrical outlets so the house is often wired with about TWO outlets then after the inspection it gets a do-over.

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2 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

I did the same and here is the funny thing.  It passed the inspection BEFORE I had an electrician totally rewire it.  I asked about it and was told that there is some kind of tax on the number of electrical outlets so the house is often wired with about TWO outlets then after the inspection it gets a do-over.

I'm not sure if there is a tax on the number of outlets as such, but when we applied for an electricity supply we had to list out each outlet and pay a deposit based on that. 

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9 minutes ago, hk blues said:

I'm not sure if there is a tax on the number of outlets as such, but when we applied for an electricity supply we had to list out each outlet and pay a deposit based on that. 

 Yes that is correct, it is also used to gauge the Total Voltage possible requirement of the House to eliminate  possible Overloading, That is why plans of Electrical circuits are presented to Planning authorities or should be :smile:

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