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Not sure why people get themselves into these situations. Do they not know the law or think no one is watching? 

 

PRESS RELEASE
08 March 2021
BI upholds decision ordering
Dutch activist to leave
Manila, PHILIPPINES—the Bureau of Immigration (BI) has denied the appeal of Dutch National Otto Rudolf De Vries on the cancellation of his residence visa.
In an order dated February 26, the 3-man BI Board of Commissioners (BOC) denied De Vries’ request to reverse the ruling on the cancelation of his Section 13 permanent residence visa.
In his motion for reconsideration submitted on February 8, he stated that the BI BOC order is without valid and legal cause.  His appeal, however, was denied for failure to provide evidence to reverse said decision.
It can be recalled that in November, the BI canceled his visa, following information from government intelligence sources that he actively participated in several protest rallies in the country.
De Vries has reportedly been in the country since September 2019, and has been spotted in rallies in Mendiola, and Pasig, among others.
Apart from the cancelation of his visa, De Vries has been ordered to immediately leave the country.  De Vries has been tagged as an undesirable alien, and his name has likewise been included in the BI’s blacklist.
According to BI Commissioner Jaime Morente, the rule for foreign nationals is simple and clear.  “There were photos of him engaged in several rallies in the country.  Foreigners have no business joining such activities as it is a clear violation of their conditions of stay,” said Morente.  “Time and time again we remind foreign nationals not to engage in partisan political activities.  There are no exemptions, even permanent residence visas may be canceled for said violation,” he added.

https://www.facebook.com/officialbureauofimmigration/posts/1962095513929146

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1 hour ago, Jollygoodfellow said:

Do they not know the law

Oh they know the law, being booted out is part of their overall gameplan at some point.

1 hour ago, Jollygoodfellow said:

Dutch activist to leave

Activist is the key word, he is not some touchy feely, feed the hungry and treat the sick do gooder, but a political (of some stripe) animal and getting in the news is to his benefit. Not only did he make the news here, but now he will be able to go back to Europe and hit the speaking circuit and rant to his fellow travelers about the despotic system in the Philippines :thumbsup:

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Some Foreigners think themselves so correct that they are above local laws. The regime in power has shown itself to be violent and unpredictable. Expats are being watched and not exempt from its power in fact are made example of. :bash:

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I wish Canada would kick out permanent residents who only moved here to stir up shit.  I give the Philippines a thumbs up fot that.

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1 hour ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

I wish Canada would kick out permanent residents who only moved here to stir up shit.  I give the Philippines a thumbs up fot that.

Still lots of room in the US. :hystery:

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12 minutes ago, Mike J said:

Still lots of room in the US. :hystery:

Yea, they are all moving to Texas after destroying California. 

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11 hours ago, Dave Hounddriver said:

I wish Canada would kick out permanent residents who only moved here to stir up shit.  I give the Philippines a thumbs up fot that.

Canada does. Big time. Search google....

 

google says: Refugees are stripped of their permanent residency and face deportation, while permanent residents convicted of minor offences — including traffic offenses — are deported without a right to appeal. The Canadian government deported 117,531 people between 2006 and 2014.

http://www.neverhome.ca/deportation/#:~:text=Refugees are stripped of their,people between 2006 and 2014.

Canadian government deported an average of 35 people per day over the past nine years, including to countries with moratoriums on deportation.

Deportation: The Canadian government deported 117,531 people between 2006 and 2014, including to countries with official moratoriums on deportation. The federal government and Canada Border Services Agency bribe people to self-deport and use international smugglers. Refugees are stripped of their permanent residency and face deportation, while permanent residents convicted of minor offences — including traffic offenses — are deported without a right to appeal.

The Canadian government deported 117,531 people between 2006 and 2014. In the last several years, despite official moratoriums on deportation to these countries, more than 500 people were sent to Iraq, Haiti, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan, Syria, Somalia and other politically volatile states.

I tried to explain to CBSA [Canada Border Services Agency] that I come from the Gaza Strip, that I can’t go back. I have issues there, I fear for my life. None of that made any sense to them, so i found myself handcuffed and thrown in a detention centre in Vancouver airport and then an airplane. — Hamoudi Ghareeb.

In 2012, the federal government began a program to bribe refugee claimants to abandon their refugee claims and self-deport. From 2012-2014, the government spent $7.5 million paying 36,000 refugee claimants, primarily Roma from Hungary, to leave Canada. It was recently revealed that Canada Border Services Agency was using international smugglers to get fake documents to deport migrants to countries to which they have no connection.

From 2012-2014, the government spent $7.5 million paying 36,000 refugee claimants, primarily Roma from Hungary, to leave Canada.

The 2012 “Refugee Exclusion Act” (Bill C-31, officially known as Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act) allows the Immigration and Refugee Board to strip accepted refugees of their permanent residency status and face deportation. The federal government is now actively pursuing reopening asylum files under “cessation applications” and forcing refugees whose circumstances may have changed to leave Canada.

Since these changes, the number of former refugees who have lost their protected status and permanent residency almost quintupled. The Conservative government set an arbitrary annual target of 875 applications to strip refugee status.

Deportation Raids

In 2010 the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) entered Beatrice House, a downtown Toronto shelter, looking for a woman identified as Jane and her three-year-old daughter. Jane had arrived in Canada in 1999 from Ghana as a survivor of sexual violence. Her refugee claim had been rejected and she was due for removal around 2006. At the time of the raid, she and her daughter had just moved to another shelter. As Jane describes, “It’s scary. I can’t go to sleep I’m scared not just for myself, but for others in shelters everywhere who are facing the same fear.”

According to a 2009 House of Commons immigration committee report, estimates of those living in Canada without immigration status ranged from 80,000-500,000 people. With the more recent exclusionary overhaul of the refugee system and restrictions for temporary foreign workers, this number has likely risen.

The CBSA has detained and deported migrants from women’s shelters, vehicle safety checks and hospitals. As registered nurse Natalie Blair recounts, “There’s been situations where people have been [apprehended] right from their hospital beds. Like, they’ve woken up and there’s been CBSA beside them.”

Criminalization, Double Punishment and Deportation

Deportations are not only increasing for refugee claimants or those with precarious status, but also for those with permanent residency status. The federal government’s ‘tough on crime’ agenda targets immigrant communities.

For example in 2008, 18-year-old Fredy Villanueva was shot and killed by Montreal police officer Jean-Loup Lapointe. Shortly after, his brother Dany Villanueva, who was a key eyewitness at the public inquiry into the killing of Fredy, faced deportation to Honduras. Despite the fact that Dany’s criminal record was expunged in 2008 and he has lived in Canada since the age of 12, he faces being torn apart from his home and family for old criminal convictions. This is a policy of double punishment where non-citizens, especially those who are racialized, face deportation after already being profiled and punished by the criminal justice system.

The “Immigrant Criminalization Law” (Bill C-43, officially known as the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act), which passed in 2013, allows for deportations of thousands of permanent residents who have been convicted for minor offences including traffic offenses. The right to appeal the deportation order is stripped from many of these individuals.

In May 2015, the federal government introduced the Removal of Serious Foreign Criminals Act that continues the trend of criminalization of immigrants and refugees, including those with permanent residency. The bill allows people with certain criminal convictions within Canada to be forced back to their home country without their consent. The bill also denies them access to the pardon process.

The federal government’s ‘tough on crime’ agenda targets immigrant communities.

Going even further, in 2011, the government released a ‘most-wanted’ list to media with names, photos and other identifying information of thirty men wanted for deportation from Canada. Ottawa declared that these men “had violated human or international rights under the Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act.” None had actually even faced trial in Canada, but the Immigration and Refugee Board had ruled them inadmissible simply because of vague suspicions. Legal and civil liberties organizations oppose this list since publicly shaming people and referring to them as “suspected war criminals” violates the presumption of innocence.

The federal government’s push to criminalize sex-workers is evident not only in its new prostitution laws but also within immigration policy. The federal government’s 2012 Omnibus Crime Bill C-10 included amendments that granted immigration officials the ability to deny a work permit to applicants who are “vulnerable to abuse or exploitation.” The backgrounder provided by the government explicitly mentions exotic dancers, low-skilled workers, and victims of trafficking. As the Canadian Council for Refugees explains, “it is demeaning for women to have a visa officer decide that they should be kept out of Canada for their own protection.”

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I don't know--I think there are a lot of ignorant foreigners who didn't do their homework before coming here. That seems pretty basic. Some folks might just feel that they are above the law, being very self righteous or maybe just naive.

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8 hours ago, jpbago said:

Canada does. Big time. Search google....

From your article a completely different matter than what the topic is about. 

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14 hours ago, Jollygoodfellow said:

From your article a completely different matter than what the topic is about. 

On 3/9/2021 at 11:59 PM, Old55 said:

Yea, they are all moving to Texas after destroying California. 

On 3/9/2021 at 10:42 PM, Dave Hounddriver said:

I wish Canada would kick out permanent residents who only moved here to stir up shit.  I give the Philippines a thumbs up fot that.

Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.......Just sayin. :tiphat:

Edited by Kuya John
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