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Building a Bungalow with Zero CHB`s.


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8 hours ago, fred said:

Then we clad the studs with 1/4" hardiflex on the exterior only (4ft high-8Ft long).. All screw holes countersunk so screwhead can be filled over flush.
All electric wire threaded in flexible orange conduits and fitted in position on interior before inside cladded..
 

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Is that your chair to sit on inspecting the work Fred 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, stevewool said:

Is that your chair to sit on inspecting the work Fred 

No.. Thats my hop up.
I aint got time to sit down!

 

Been a long time Steve.. How are ya??

Edited by fred
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1 hour ago, Guy F. said:

How can you be sure the hardwood floor won't eventually be consumed by termites? Install a network of perforated pipes underneath so solignum can be periodically injected? Use termite-resistant wood such as Molave?

No Hardwood floors..Only hardwood doors!!
We do have ceramic tiles that look a bit like hardwood though.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Viking said:

Can you tell us more about how you designed the roof? From my experience that is where most of the heat inside is coming from, so it is important to solve that in a good way.

If you look at the last picture,just above the balcony roofing you will see a vent that goes the whole length of the roof on both sides of the building.. Heat will exit on it`s downward path via the least path of resistance and out of those vents before it penetrates the Gypsum ceiling and heats up the room.

I got that idea after driving through Luzon years ago and noticing the roof design on large poultry farm buildings.
It definitely works. 

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Edited by fred
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1 hour ago, fred said:

If you look at the last picture,just above the balcony roofing you will see a vent that goes the whole length of the roof on both sides of the building.. Heat will exit on it`s downward path via the least path of resistance and out of those vents before it penetrates the Gypsum ceiling and heats up the room.

I got that idea after driving through Luzon years ago and noticing the roof design on large poultry farm buildings.
It definitely works. 

IPCJanFeb18_for_web_page20_image2.jpg

Heat rise, but I suppose it will be a lot better having exits low than no exits at al. Optimum solution would probably be to have some kind of venting at the top of the roof. Also, high ceilings help with keeping the temperatures down.

Will you use reflective aluminumfoil under your roof?

Our house have minimal ways for the heat to escape so we will need to make something about that when we get down for permanent staying. I have been thinking much of this, how to solve it in the best way possible, so all ideas are welcome :tiphat:

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3 hours ago, fred said:

No.. Thats my hop up.
I aint got time to sit down!

 

Been a long time Steve.. How are ya??

We are both great thanks Fred , enjoying time together without that dreaded word WORK.

 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Viking said:

Heat rise, but I suppose it will be a lot better having exits low than no exits at al. Optimum solution would probably be to have some kind of venting at the top of the roof. Also, high ceilings help with keeping the temperatures down.

Will you use reflective aluminumfoil under your roof?

Our house have minimal ways for the heat to escape so we will need to make something about that when we get down for permanent staying. I have been thinking much of this, how to solve it in the best way possible, so all ideas are welcome :tiphat:

Yes heat rises,but in a sealed roof it will have nowhere else to go until it finds a vent..
Ridge vents and high level Turbine vents are also a good solution but you must have good air replacement ventilation at eves level otherwise, pretty much useless. 
When I look at the small eves vents in most local houses here it`s laughable really.
9 times out of ten they are blocked with spiders webs and dust etc.

 

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Will you use reflective aluminumfoil under your roof?

I would if it was too warm inside the living space,but it just isn't.

Edited by fred
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10 hours ago, Viking said:

Our house have minimal ways for the heat to escape so we will need to make something about that when we get down for permanent staying. I have been thinking much of this, how to solve it in the best way possible, so all ideas are welcome :tiphat:

Buy a forecourt canopy from a bankrupt garage (plenty of those here)... and build your house under it. :thumbsup:

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12 hours ago, Snowy79 said:

Depending on the design of your roof you can install a wind turbine.  It looks like a large mushroom and requires no wiring. You can after fit them on most steel roofs and they work by sucking the hot air out of the roof space.  Powered purely by thermals and wind.  On average it'll drop your roof temperature 10c. 

I have been thinking of installing a wind turbine on our roof but I am not sure how effective they are on hot rising air only, since there is very little wind on our location. There is also models that are powered by solarpanels and maybe that would be a better choice. :89:

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